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Holy Rule for May 14

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Father Maurus, still not found. He was a lead story on BBC and a full (and interesting,) article and photo can be found at:
    Message 1 of 5 , May 14, 2005
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Father Maurus, still not found. He was a lead story on BBC and a full (and interesting,) article and photo can be found at:

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/4543449.stm

      Prayers, too, for some family tensions between a mother and adult daughter to be resolved, also for Adrian, severe chest and throat infections, affecting balance and hearing, prayers for Tom, that his master's thesis be accepted as written, since he had his Mother's death and many other troubles intervene while writing it, and for his Mom's eternal rest. Prayers for Mary Ann, walking around on a knee she didn't realize was broken, and for Margaret, liver biopsy this month, also for Kay, MRI for possible neck cancer and for her husband, who is also not in good health. Prayers for the newly elected Prioress of Sacred Heart Monastery, Cullman, AL, and all their community. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL


      January 13, May 14, September 13
      Chapter 2: What Kind of Person the Abbess Ought to Be

      In her teaching
      the Abbess should always follow the Apostle's formula:
      "Reprove, entreat, rebuke" (2 Tim. 4:2);
      threatening at one time and coaxing at another
      as the occasion may require,
      showing now the stern countenance of a mistress,
      now the loving affection of a mother.
      That is to say,
      it is the undisciplined and restless
      whom she must reprove rather sharply;
      it is the obedient, meek and patient
      whom she must entreat to advance in virtue;
      while as for the negligent and disdainful,
      these we charge her to rebuke and correct.

      And let her not shut her eyes to the faults of offenders;
      but, since she has the authority,
      let her cut out those faults by the roots
      as soon as they begin to appear,
      remembering the fate of Heli, the priest of Silo (1 Kings 2-4).
      The well-disposed and those of good understanding
      let her correct with verbal admonition the first and second time.
      But bold, hard, proud and disobedient characters
      she should curb at the very beginning of their ill-doing
      by stripes and other bodily punishments,
      knowing that it is written,
      "the fool is not corrected with words" (Prov. 18:2; 29:19),
      and again,
      "Beat your son with the rod,
      and you will deliver his soul from death"(Prov. 23:13-14).

      REFLECTION

      As our world grows more populated and less personalist, "One size
      fits all" becomes a favorite chant of marketing. We all know that's
      usually not true, and it is surely not true of parenting or
      governing, as St. Benedict points out. This chapter firmly
      contradicts the lie of such marketing. We are all individuals, all
      treasures with different needs. Generic brand parenting will not do.

      I was a miserable failure at discipline when teaching high school
      sophomore English. I am sure it is an experience neither they nor I
      would like to repeat. I tried to treat them like college students or
      adults, a point they had not reached. In my naivete, I expected them
      to respond in kind. When they didn't, matters escalated between us, but not
      into anything that did much good.

      I was terribly at fault: I didn't see who they were, I gave them what *I*
      would have liked to have had, but I was already in my mid-thirties with
      a lot of life experience. I wasn't serving their needs, because I didn't
      know what they were, nor, in that first year, did I even know how to find
      out! So, like many before me, I substituted what I would want or need and
      proclaimed that one size would fit all. Wrong! NOT!

      Any abbess or parent who wants to try my way, not St. Benedict's,
      will quickly find that it is as hard on them as it is on their charges.
      My year of high school teaching was horrible and I hated it. My
      students hated it, too. It was terrible for both of us at many, many
      points. The light that entered in from time to time, the genuine
      enjoyment of each other was only a flash that appeared rarely, faded
      soon. I pray for those kids (and for those who taught me!) every day
      of my life.

      St. Benedict is not only moderate and balanced, he sees the person
      clearly. He is a personalist of the first rank. Practice his
      principles of government without the checks and balances of this
      portion and you will be very displeased with the results. It
      sometimes takes St. Benedict a while to make his point. Cut him short
      before he has, and you will often wind up very sorry. Always let him
      finish: the whole is a thing of beauty, but the parts may fall far
      short of that.

      Mercifully, God alone can bring good out of anything, so He can even
      use our wrong-headedness to bring others to Him. He can do that with
      obedience, too, but if we give Him a bit less chaos by following
      Benedict's methods rather than our own, it will be better for all
      concerned.

      To a certain point, some people thrive on a lot of leeway, others do
      not. Some people need rigid order, others will wither under that. A
      superior who is into super control will soon be left with none but
      those who need that and a few conflicted types who can at least
      endure it.

      A superior who is too easy-going can also do harm. Sad is the
      community where the only thing that will ever get all the horses back into
      the barn is death, and a few of them exist. They were produced by a
      mutual effort of bad government and bad response.

      This is not so different from the message throughout the Holy Rule:
      concern for the other, not the self, eyes on God for the good of all! And, as the
      old-timers would say: "Keep your eyes on your own choir stall." Trust me,
      you will ALWAYS find plenty to keep you busy there if you are honest
      with yourself!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers for all our Mothers on Mother s Day- at least the United States version thereof. Mothers elsewhere, welcome aboard and enjoy the warmth of many
      Message 2 of 5 , May 14, 2006
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        +PAX

        Prayers for all our Mothers on Mother's Day- at least the United States' version thereof. Mothers elsewhere, welcome aboard and enjoy the warmth of many prayers, many blessings. May God reward you all!!

        Prayers for the election of a new Prioress at Holy Name Monastery, FL

        Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias, Linda, for whom we prayed, died peacefully early Wednesday morning, without having to be put in a drug-induced coma. She died, however, with uncertain religious connections, if any, so continued prayers for her happy death. All of us given to the Divine Mercy Chaplet might perhaps offer one for her, it would be a tremendous gift. Prayers and Chaplets, too, for the three Christians on death row in Indonesia, scheduled for imminent execution by firing squad. There seems to be a lot of evidence their trial was less than objective and they are perhaps being used as scapegoats. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL



        January 13, May 14, September 13
        Chapter 2: What Kind of Person the Abbess Ought to Be

        In her teaching
        the Abbess should always follow the Apostle's formula:
        "Reprove, entreat, rebuke" (2 Tim. 4:2);
        threatening at one time and coaxing at another
        as the occasion may require,
        showing now the stern countenance of a mistress,
        now the loving affection of a mother.
        That is to say,
        it is the undisciplined and restless
        whom she must reprove rather sharply;
        it is the obedient, meek and patient
        whom she must entreat to advance in virtue;
        while as for the negligent and disdainful,
        these we charge her to rebuke and correct.

        And let her not shut her eyes to the faults of offenders;
        but, since she has the authority,
        let her cut out those faults by the roots
        as soon as they begin to appear,
        remembering the fate of Heli, the priest of Silo (1 Kings 2-4).
        The well-disposed and those of good understanding
        let her correct with verbal admonition the first and second time.
        But bold, hard, proud and disobedient characters
        she should curb at the very beginning of their ill-doing
        by stripes and other bodily punishments,
        knowing that it is written,
        "the fool is not corrected with words" (Prov. 18:2; 29:19),
        and again,
        "Beat your son with the rod,
        and you will deliver his soul from death"(Prov. 23:13-14).

        REFLECTION

        As our world grows more populated and less personalist, "One size
        fits all" becomes a favorite chant of marketing. We all know that's
        usually not true, and it is surely not true of parenting or
        governing, as St. Benedict points out. This chapter firmly
        contradicts the lie of such marketing. We are all individuals, all
        treasures with different needs. Generic brand parenting will not do.

        I was a miserable failure at discipline when teaching high school
        sophomore English. I am sure it is an experience neither they nor I
        would like to repeat. I tried to treat them like college students or
        adults, a point they had not reached. In my naivete, I expected them
        to respond in kind. When they didn't, matters escalated between us, but not
        into anything that did much good.

        I was terribly at fault: I didn't see who they were, I gave them what *I*
        would have liked to have had, but I was already in my mid-thirties with
        a lot of life experience. I wasn't serving their needs, because I didn't
        know who they were, nor, in that first year, did I even know how to find
        out! So, like many before me, I substituted what I would want or need and
        proclaimed that one size would fit all. Wrong! NOT!

        Any abbess or parent who wants to try my way, not St. Benedict's,
        will quickly find that it is as hard on them as it is on their charges.
        My year of high school teaching was horrible and I hated it. My
        students hated it, too. It was terrible for both of us at many, many
        points. The light that entered in from time to time, the genuine
        enjoyment of each other was only a flash that appeared rarely, faded
        soon. I pray for those kids (and for those who taught me!) every day
        of my life.

        St. Benedict is not only moderate and balanced, he sees the person
        clearly. He is a personalist of the first rank. Practice his
        principles of government without the checks and balances of this
        portion and you will be very displeased with the results. It
        sometimes takes St. Benedict a while to make his point. Cut him short
        before he has, and you will often wind up very sorry. Always let him
        finish: the whole is a thing of beauty, but the parts may fall far
        short of that.

        Mercifully, God alone can bring good out of anything, so He can even
        use our wrong-headedness to bring others to Him. He can do that with
        obedience, too, but if we give Him a bit less chaos by following
        Benedict's methods rather than our own, it will be better for all
        concerned.

        To a certain point, some people thrive on a lot of leeway, others do
        not. Some people need rigid order, others will wither under that. A
        superior who is into super control will soon be left with none but
        those who need that and a few conflicted types who can at least
        endure it.

        A superior who is too easy-going can also do harm. Sad is the
        community where the only thing that will ever get all the horses back into
        the barn is death, and a few of such exist. They were produced by a
        mutual effort of bad government and bad response.

        This is not so different from the message throughout the Holy Rule:
        concern for the other, not the self, eyes on God for the good of all! And, as
        the old-timers would say: "Keep your eyes on your own choir stall." Trust me,
        you will ALWAYS find plenty to keep you busy there if you are honest
        with yourself!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers, please, for Barbara, for a safe trip to Iceland. Prayers, too, for Ann s Mom, troubling abdominal pain and back pain that she worries may be
        Message 3 of 5 , May 13, 2007
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          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for Barbara, for a safe trip to Iceland. Prayers, too, for Ann's Mom, troubling abdominal pain and back pain that she worries may be cardiac related, as her Mom already has a pacemaker which has had some problems and may need replacement. Prayers for Ann and her daughters, too. Prayers for all those becoming Oblate novices or Oblates next week at St. Scholastica's Monastery, Fort Smith, Arkansas, especially for Ann and her best friend, beginning the program there with joy! Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          January 13, May 14, September 13
          Chapter 2: What Kind of Person the Abbess Ought to Be

          In her teaching
          the Abbess should always follow the Apostle's formula:
          "Reprove, entreat, rebuke" (2 Tim. 4:2);
          threatening at one time and coaxing at another
          as the occasion may require,
          showing now the stern countenance of a mistress,
          now the loving affection of a mother.
          That is to say,
          it is the undisciplined and restless
          whom she must reprove rather sharply;
          it is the obedient, meek and patient
          whom she must entreat to advance in virtue;
          while as for the negligent and disdainful,
          these we charge her to rebuke and correct.

          And let her not shut her eyes to the faults of offenders;
          but, since she has the authority,
          let her cut out those faults by the roots
          as soon as they begin to appear,
          remembering the fate of Heli, the priest of Silo (1 Kings 2-4).
          The well-disposed and those of good understanding
          let her correct with verbal admonition the first and second time.
          But bold, hard, proud and disobedient characters
          she should curb at the very beginning of their ill-doing
          by stripes and other bodily punishments,
          knowing that it is written,
          "the fool is not corrected with words" (Prov. 18:2; 29:19),
          and again,
          "Beat your son with the rod,
          and you will deliver his soul from death"(Prov. 23:13-14).

          REFLECTION

          As our world grows more populated and less personalist, "One size
          fits all" becomes a favorite chant of marketing. We all know that's
          usually not true, and it is surely not true of parenting or
          governing, as St. Benedict points out. This chapter firmly
          contradicts the lie of such marketing. We are all individuals, all
          treasures with different needs. Generic brand parenting will not do.

          I was a miserable failure at discipline when teaching high school
          sophomore English. I am sure it is an experience neither they nor I
          would like to repeat. I tried to treat them like college students or
          adults, a point they had not reached. In my naiveté, I expected them
          to respond in kind. When they didn't, matters escalated between us, but not
          into anything that did much good.

          I was terribly at fault: I didn't see who they were, I gave them what *I*
          would have liked to have had, but I was already in my mid-thirties with
          a lot of life experience. I wasn't serving their needs, because I didn't
          know who they were, nor, in that first year, did I even know how to find
          out! So, like many before me, I substituted what I would want or need and
          proclaimed that one size would fit all. Wrong! NOT!

          Any abbess or parent who wants to try my way, not St. Benedict's,
          will quickly find that it is as hard on them as it is on their charges.
          My year of high school teaching was horrible and I hated it. My
          students hated it, too. It was terrible for both of us at many, many
          points. The light that entered in from time to time, the genuine
          enjoyment of each other was only a flash that appeared rarely, faded
          soon. I pray for those kids (and for those who taught me!) every day
          of my life.

          St. Benedict is not only moderate and balanced, he sees the person
          clearly. He is a personalist of the first rank. Practice his
          principles of government without the checks and balances of this
          portion and you will be very displeased with the results. It
          sometimes takes St. Benedict a while to make his point. Cut him short
          before he has, and you will often wind up very sorry. Always let him
          finish: the whole is a thing of beauty, but the parts may fall far
          short of that.

          Mercifully, God alone can bring good out of anything, so He can even
          use our wrong-headedness to bring others to Him. He can do that with
          obedience, too, but if we give Him a bit less chaos by following
          Benedict's methods rather than our own, it will be better for all
          concerned.

          To a certain point, some people thrive on a lot of leeway, others do
          not. Some people need rigid order, others will wither under that. A
          superior who is into super control will soon be left with none but
          those who need that and a few conflicted types who can at least
          endure it.

          A superior who is too easy-going can also do harm. Sad is the
          community where the only thing that will ever get all the horses back into
          the barn is death, and a few of such exist. They were produced by a
          mutual effort of bad government and bad response.

          This is not so different from the message throughout the Holy Rule:
          concern for the other, not the self, eyes on God for the good of all! And, as
          the old-timers would say: "Keep your eyes on your own choir stall." Trust me,
          you will ALWAYS find plenty to keep you busy there if you are honest
          with yourself!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers of Deo gratias and thanksgiving for Jeanne, who finally got a medication she badly needed, also for Joe, whose prostate surgery we prayed for:
          Message 4 of 5 , May 13, 2008
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            +PAX

            Prayers of Deo gratias and thanksgiving for Jeanne, who finally got a medication she badly needed, also for Joe, whose prostate surgery we prayed for: lymph nodes negative and surgery went well, continued prayers as they check the prostate for spread of cancer.

            Prayers for the happy death and etenal rest of a Med Flight team, all killed when their Med Flight crashed: Steve, Mark and Darren and for all who mourn them. Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Fr. Paschal, OSB, of Belmont Abbey, North Carolina. He died last Autumn, but I just found out. Prayers for all who mourn him, too.

            Prayers for the spiritual, mental and phsyical well-being of the following and fo all their loved ones and all who treat them:

            Paul, panic attack.

            Pat, pancreatitis and failing kidneys, probably due to alcohol. He's also lost his job recently, and he and his wife have a new baby boy. This is his second serious illness, and he's really in denial about his alcohol use. And for his mother, Carole, very worried about him. Safe travels for her, too, as she drives from Florida to be with them.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will.
            God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him!
            Thanks so much. JL

            January 13, May 14, September 13
            Chapter 2: What Kind of Person the Abbess Ought to Be

            In her teaching
            the Abbess should always follow the Apostle's formula:
            "Reprove, entreat, rebuke" (2 Tim. 4:2);
            threatening at one time and coaxing at another
            as the occasion may require,
            showing now the stern countenance of a mistress,
            now the loving affection of a mother.
            That is to say,
            it is the undisciplined and restless
            whom she must reprove rather sharply;
            it is the obedient, meek and patient
            whom she must entreat to advance in virtue;
            while as for the negligent and disdainful,
            these we charge her to rebuke and correct.

            And let her not shut her eyes to the faults of offenders;
            but, since she has the authority,
            let her cut out those faults by the roots
            as soon as they begin to appear,
            remembering the fate of Heli, the priest of Silo (1 Kings 2-4).
            The well-disposed and those of good understanding
            let her correct with verbal admonition the first and second time.
            But bold, hard, proud and disobedient characters
            she should curb at the very beginning of their ill-doing
            by stripes and other bodily punishments,
            knowing that it is written,
            "the fool is not corrected with words" (Prov. 18:2; 29:19),
            and again,
            "Beat your son with the rod,
            and you will deliver his soul from death"(Prov. 23:13-14).

            REFLECTION

            As our world grows more populated and less personalist, "One size
            fits all" becomes a favorite chant of marketing. We all know that's
            usually not true, and it is surely not true of parenting or
            governing, as St. Benedict points out. This chapter firmly
            contradicts the lie of such marketing. We are all individuals, all
            treasures with different needs. Generic brand parenting will not do.

            I was a miserable failure at discipline when teaching high school
            sophomore English. I am sure it is an experience neither they nor I
            would like to repeat. I tried to treat them like college students or
            adults, a point they had not reached. In my naiveté, I expected them
            to respond in kind. When they didn't, matters escalated between us, but not
            into anything that did much good.

            I was terribly at fault: I didn't see who they were, I gave them what *I*
            would have liked to have had, but I was already in my mid-thirties with
            a lot of life experience. I wasn't serving their needs, because I didn't
            know who they were, nor, in that first year, did I even know how to find
            out! So, like many before me, I substituted what I would want or need and
            proclaimed that one size would fit all. Wrong! NOT!

            Any abbess or parent who wants to try my way, not St. Benedict's,
            will quickly find that it is as hard on them as it is on their charges.
            My year of high school teaching was horrible and I hated it. My
            students hated it, too. It was terrible for both of us at many, many
            points. The light that entered in from time to time, the genuine
            enjoyment of each other was only a flash that appeared rarely, faded
            soon. I pray for those kids (and for those who taught me!) every day
            of my life.

            St. Benedict is not only moderate and balanced, he sees the person
            clearly. He is a personalist of the first rank. Practice his
            principles of government without the checks and balances of this
            portion and you will be very displeased with the results. It
            sometimes takes St. Benedict a while to make his point. Cut him short
            before he has, and you will often wind up very sorry. Always let him
            finish: the whole is a thing of beauty, but the parts may fall far
            short of that.

            Mercifully, God alone can bring good out of anything, so He can even
            use our wrong-headedness to bring others to Him. He can do that with
            obedience, too, but if we give Him a bit less chaos by following
            Benedict's methods rather than our own, it will be better for all
            concerned.

            To a certain point, some people thrive on a lot of leeway, others do
            not. Some people need rigid order, others will wither under that. A
            superior who is into super control will soon be left with none but
            those who need that and a few conflicted types who can at least
            endure it.

            A superior who is too easy-going can also do harm. Sad is the
            community where the only thing that will ever get all the horses back into
            the barn is death, and a few of such exist. They were produced by a
            mutual effort of bad government and bad response.

            This is not so different from the message throughout the Holy Rule:
            concern for the other, not the self, eyes on God for the good of all! And, as
            the old-timers would say: "Keep your eyes on your own choir stall." Trust me,
            you will ALWAYS find plenty to keep you busy there if you are honest
            with yourself!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            jeromeleo@...
            Petersham, MA

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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