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Holy Rule for Apr. 22

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Please forgive me if I missed anyone today: there were a lot of requests and they were scattered all over my inbox. If I did miss someone, please let me
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 22, 2005
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      +PAX

      Please forgive me if I missed anyone today: there were a lot of requests and they were scattered all over my inbox. If I did miss someone, please let me know.

      Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for Jeanne, doing well, and for her daughter Melanie, and for Mary, and her daughter Louise, also recovering well. Prayers for two stabbing victims, one a first-time expectant mother who was stabbed in the back by a deranged person, for her husband and all their family, and also for Abigail, stabbed in the neck in a random attack and now paralysed and conscious, but on a ventilator. Some signs of sensation in her fingers appear to be present, prayers, too, for her toddler, Joseph, and her husband, Benoit, and all their family. Prayers for Will, facing a third surgery on his hip next month and for Barb, his wife. Prayers for Maureen, several job interviews in NY, where she hopes to move after graduation. Prayers for someone truly very assailed by mental illness- major intercession needed here. Prayers for Keara and her career as a vocalist, also for her two siblings in the performing arts and their Mom, Trish. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him. Thanks so much! JL

      April 22, August 22, December 22
      Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

      It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
      gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
      For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
      and consider themselves second Abbots.
      By usurping power
      they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
      Especially does this happen
      in those places where the Prior is constituted
      by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
      who constitute the Abbot himself.
      What an absurd procedure this is
      can easily be seen;
      for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
      from the very time of his constitution,
      by putting the thought into his mind
      that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
      "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
      by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
      From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
      rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
      For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
      their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
      and those who are under them,
      currying favor with one side or the other,
      go to ruin.
      The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
      rests on the heads of those
      whose action brought about such disorder.

      REFLECTION

      When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
      side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
      Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
      but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
      That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
      important.

      St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
      own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
      personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
      that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
      they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
      children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
      in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

      Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
      in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
      monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
      said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
      disciple." One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
      knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
      time, we can be convinced we know better. Sometimes, perhaps, we do,
      but in most cases, obedience is a real protection from harm.
      Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
      Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
      of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

      One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
      necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
      stretch for us adults!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers of Deo gratias for a woman for whom we have prayed. She is out of her abusive marriage and well on her way to a new life. The husband, alas, has
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 22, 2006
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        +PAX

        Prayers of Deo gratias for a woman for whom we have prayed. She is out of her abusive marriage and well on her way to a new life. The husband, alas, has found yet another woman, so prayers for them, too: that he be converted and that the new woman see the light if he isn't. Prayers of Deo gratias for two on different stages of finding a vocation to solitude, God prosper every step of their way! Further Deo gratias, the mother of preemie twins we prayed for has safely delivered Amir and Mira, now home after a few weeks of Neonate ICU care, to the joy and relief of all. Deo gratias (my, there is a lot to thank Him for today! But there is every day, we just don't always see it...) for an interim minister whose job was well done, a tiny Church well on its feet and ready for a permanent pastor. One sows and another reaps, but God uses us all!

        Prayers for special financial needs and intentions of Noel, for him to be able to better care for family and educate his children. Prayers for an Oblate who is embarking on a new schedule of prayer she finds helpful. May God guide her all the way!

        Very special prayers for one who is struggling so bravely and painfully with the sin of adultery. Most of us have known sexual falls of one sort or another, so let us all keep this person in our hearts for ardent prayer. Many of us know how difficult and deep=seated these sexual problems can be. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much!! JL

        April 22, August 22, December 22
        Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

        It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
        gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
        For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
        and consider themselves second Abbots.
        By usurping power
        they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
        Especially does this happen
        in those places where the Prior is constituted
        by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
        who constitute the Abbot himself.
        What an absurd procedure this is
        can easily be seen;
        for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
        from the very time of his constitution,
        by putting the thought into his mind
        that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
        "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
        by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
        From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
        rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
        For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
        their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
        and those who are under them,
        currying favor with one side or the other,
        go to ruin.
        The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
        rests on the heads of those
        whose action brought about such disorder.

        REFLECTION

        When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
        side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
        Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
        but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
        That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
        important.

        St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
        own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
        personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
        that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
        they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
        children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
        in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

        Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
        in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
        monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
        said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
        disciple."

        One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
        knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
        time, we can be convinced we know better. That is a risky conclusion
        to make. Our obedience is a real protection from harm.

        Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
        Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
        of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

        One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
        necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
        stretch for us adults!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Prayers, please, for Ronda, in a Recovery halfway house.She left on Thursday for a visit with her MD and has not returned, and for her Dad, who is very
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 21, 2007
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          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for Ronda, in a Recovery halfway house.She left on Thursday
          for a visit with her MD and has not returned, and for her Dad, who is very
          worried about her. Deo gratias from Claudia, the weather smiled on her book
          signing, against considerable odds. God is good! Continued prayers for Ann
          Marie and her leadership course and testing. Prayers for N., severe mental
          illness, and for all his family. Continued prayers, please, for Steve, Br.
          Vincent's brother, and for Vita and Cos, his parents, and for all their family. Steve
          is making progress slowly and all are so grateful for your prayers. Lord,
          help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
          God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          April 22, August 22, December 22
          Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

          It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
          gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
          For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
          and consider themselves second Abbots.
          By usurping power
          they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
          Especially does this happen
          in those places where the Prior is constituted
          by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
          who constitute the Abbot himself.
          What an absurd procedure this is
          can easily be seen;
          for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
          from the very time of his constitution,
          by putting the thought into his mind
          that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
          "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
          by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
          From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
          rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
          For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
          their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
          and those who are under them,
          currying favor with one side or the other,
          go to ruin.
          The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
          rests on the heads of those
          whose action brought about such disorder.

          REFLECTION

          When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
          side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
          Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
          but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
          That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
          important.

          St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
          own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
          personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
          that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
          they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
          children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
          in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

          Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
          in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
          monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
          said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
          disciple."

          One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
          knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
          time, we can be convinced we know better. That is a risky conclusion
          to make. Our obedience is a real protection from harm.

          Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
          Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
          of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

          One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
          necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
          stretch for us adults!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA





          ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jeromeleo@stmarysmonastery.org
          +PAX Prayers, please, for baby Jesse, less than a week old, in neonatal ICU with fluid on lungs and for the worried parents. Lord, help us all as You know and
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 21, 2008
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            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for baby Jesse, less than a week old, in neonatal ICU with fluid on lungs and for the worried parents.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
            God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 22, August 22, December 22
            Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

            It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
            gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
            For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
            and consider themselves second Abbots.
            By usurping power
            they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
            Especially does this happen
            in those places where the Prior is constituted
            by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
            who constitute the Abbot himself.
            What an absurd procedure this is
            can easily be seen;
            for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
            from the very time of his constitution,
            by putting the thought into his mind
            that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
            "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
            by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
            From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
            rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
            For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
            their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
            and those who are under them,
            currying favor with one side or the other,
            go to ruin.
            The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
            rests on the heads of those
            whose action brought about such disorder.

            REFLECTION

            When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
            side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
            Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
            but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
            That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
            important.

            St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
            own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
            personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
            that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
            they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
            children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
            in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

            Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
            in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
            monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
            said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
            disciple."

            One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
            knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
            time, we can be convinced we know better. That is a risky conclusion
            to make. Our obedience is a real protection from harm.

            Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
            Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
            of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

            One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
            necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
            stretch for us adults!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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