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Holy Rule for Apr. 12

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers of Deo gratias and thanksgiving for Natalie, who has returned to work yesterday! Her recovery was difficult for her, an active woman who chafes at
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 12, 2005
      +PAX

      Prayers of Deo gratias and thanksgiving for Natalie, who has returned to work yesterday! Her recovery was difficult for her, an active woman who chafes at being off her feet, but God graced her amply during her "cloistered days." Lord, help them as you know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

      April 12, August 12, December 12
      Chapter 58: On the Manner of Receiving Sisters

      When she is to be received
      she promises before all in the oratory
      stability,
      fidelity to monastic life
      and obedience.
      This promise she shall make before God and His Saints,
      so that if she should ever act otherwise,
      she may know that she will be condemned by Him whom she mocks.
      Of this promise of hers let her draw up a document
      in the name of the Saints whose relics are there
      and of the Abbess who is present.
      Let her write this document with her own hand;
      or if she is illiterate, let another write it at her request,
      and let the novice put her mark to it.
      Then let her place it with her own hand upon the altar;
      and when she has placed it there,
      let the novice at once intone this verse:
      "Receive me, O Lord, according to Your word, and I shall live:
      and let me not be confounded in my hope" (Ps. 118[119]:116).
      Let the whole community answer this verse three times
      and add the "Glory be to the Father."
      Then let the novice prostrate herself at each one's feet,
      that they may pray for her.
      And from that day forward
      let her be counted as one of the community.

      If she has any property,
      let her either give it beforehand to the poor
      or by solemn donation bestow it on the monastery,
      reserving nothing at all for herself,
      as indeed she knows that from that day forward
      she will no longer have power even over her own body.
      At once, therefore, in the oratory,
      let her be divested of her own clothes which she is wearing
      and dressed in the clothes of the monastery.
      But let the clothes of which she was divested
      be put aside in the wardrobe and kept there.
      Then if she should ever listen to the persuasions of the devil
      and decide to leave the monastery (which God forbid),
      she may be divested of the monastic clothes and cast out.
      Her document, however,
      which the Abbess has taken from the altar,
      shall not be returned to her, but shall be kept in the monastery.

      REFLECTION

      It is thrilling to me to know that, more than 1500 years later, we
      are still doing professions in the way St. Benedict did. A few things
      added, but the elements are there: writing and signing the document,
      placing it on the altar, the Suscipe ("Receive me, O Lord...") are all
      tremendously ancient and holy rites. What a privilege we have to
      belong to such a family.

      The Church approves religious rules. This is the basis for asserting
      that our Holy Rule is inspired by the Holy Spirit, because the Church
      gave its seal of approval. The Church, however, is indubitably older
      and often wiser (in SOME respects, but by no means ALL!) than
      monastic life. It predates every form of optional religious
      commitment. It is the blessing of the Church which makes official
      monastic life possible for any and all of us.

      This is just a prelude to saying that the wisdom of the Church long
      ago stopped people from making solemn vows, a life-long commitment
      difficult to break, right out of novitiate. Not only does this longer
      program protect people, to a certain extent, from making a mistake,
      it also spares the monastery from having a lot of misfits with chapter
      votes running the show. There are many, many I have known who left in
      simple vows that I remain eternally grateful for the fact that they
      were never chapter members!! What a zoo that would have been!

      A year may well have been enough in St. Benedict's time. People had
      vastly shorter life spans, it was a bigger chunk of their lives. They
      also had to grow up more quickly and their options were fewer by far
      than those of our own day.

      Oblates, therefore, can garner a few kernels of truth in this chapter
      about commitment, that bugbear of the post-Word War II generation and
      beyond. Modern people find it terribly hard to commit, some never
      manage it at all. As such, a bit of wisdom older than our own age may
      be very useful in our everyday lives.

      Whether it's a marriage or engagement or job or volunteer chairperson
      position, don't jump at things. Read the Rule, so to speak, three
      times at least! Look, look, look as mindfully as you can at the truth
      and reality of the situation. I have a friend who has suffered
      terribly in relationships which he ALWAYS insists are just wonderful
      and worth the effort, any effort, no matter who can see otherwise. He
      clings to this denial until they dump him and I DO mean clings. Out of
      fear, he does not really LOOK at the situation.

      Benedictines are not people afraid of commitment, but we live in a
      world where many are. Our witness here must be care and balance. We
      must resolutely walk BETWEEN the extremes of foolhardy haste and
      crippling fear. In the world of today, that is no small witness and
      no easy task. Pull this one off, and you have a done a service to
      many, not just to yourself!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Nancy and Dave, who were expecting twins. One twin has now died and Nancy is in premature labor at five months. Thanksgiving an Deo
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 12, 2006
        +PAX
        Prayers, please, for Nancy and Dave, who were expecting twins. One twin has now died and Nancy is in premature labor at five months. Thanksgiving an Deo gratias prayers for Mary Lou, her brain surgery went well, she is now in occupational and physical therapy and radium treatments will follow. Prayers for all suffering from obsessive/compulsive disorder. Prayers that a rift between three friends is healed.

        Prayers for the reunion of the Society of St. Pius X with the Roman Church, prayers, too, for vocations to St. Mary's Monastery and to all our monasteries. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        April 12, August 12, December 12
        Chapter 58: On the Manner of Receiving Sisters
        When she is to be received
        she promises before all in the oratory
        stability,
        fidelity to monastic life
        and obedience.
        This promise she shall make before God and His Saints,
        so that if she should ever act otherwise,
        she may know that she will be condemned by Him whom she mocks.
        Of this promise of hers let her draw up a document
        in the name of the Saints whose relics are there
        and of the Abbess who is present.
        Let her write this document with her own hand;
        or if she is illiterate, let another write it at her request,
        and let the novice put her mark to it.
        Then let her place it with her own hand upon the altar;
        and when she has placed it there,
        let the novice at once intone this verse:
        "Receive me, O Lord, according to Your word, and I shall live:
        and let me not be confounded in my hope" (Ps. 118[119]:116).
        Let the whole community answer this verse three times
        and add the "Glory be to the Father."
        Then let the novice prostrate herself at each one's feet,
        that they may pray for her.
        And from that day forward
        let her be counted as one of the community.
        If she has any property,
        let her either give it beforehand to the poor
        or by solemn donation bestow it on the monastery,
        reserving nothing at all for herself,
        as indeed she knows that from that day forward
        she will no longer have power even over her own body.
        At once, therefore, in the oratory,
        let her be divested of her own clothes which she is wearing
        and dressed in the clothes of the monastery.
        But let the clothes of which she was divested
        be put aside in the wardrobe and kept there.
        Then if she should ever listen to the persuasions of the devil
        and decide to leave the monastery (which God forbid),
        she may be divested of the monastic clothes and cast out.
        Her document, however,
        which the Abbess has taken from the altar,
        shall not be returned to her, but shall be kept in the monastery.
        REFLECTION

        It is thrilling to me to know that, more than 1500 years later, we
        are still doing professions in the way St. Benedict did. A few things
        added, but the elements are there: writing and signing the document,
        placing it on the altar, the Suscipe ("Receive me, O Lord...") are all
        tremendously ancient and holy rites. What a privilege we have to
        belong to such a family.

        The Church approves religious rules. This is the basis for asserting
        that our Holy Rule is inspired by the Holy Spirit, because the Church
        gave its seal of approval. The Church, however, is indubitably older
        and often wiser (in SOME respects, but by no means ALL!) than
        monastic life. It predates every form of optional religious
        commitment. It is the blessing of the Church which makes official
        monastic life possible for any and all of us.

        This is just a prelude to saying that the wisdom of the Church long
        ago stopped people from making solemn vows, a life-long commitment
        difficult to break, right out of novitiate. Not only does this longer
        program protect people, to a certain extent, from making a mistake,
        it also spares the monastery from having a lot of misfits with chapter
        votes running the show. There are many, many I have known who left in
        simple vows that I remain eternally grateful for the fact that they
        were never chapter members!! What a zoo that would have been!

        A year may well have been enough in St. Benedict's time. People had
        vastly shorter life spans, it was a bigger chunk of their lives. They
        also had to grow up more quickly and their options were fewer by far
        than those of our own day.

        Oblates, therefore, can garner a few kernels of truth in this chapter
        about commitment, that bugbear of the post-Word War II generation and
        beyond. Modern people find it terribly hard to commit, some never
        manage it at all. As such, a bit of wisdom older than our own age may
        be very useful in our everyday lives.

        Whether it's a marriage or engagement or job or volunteer chairperson
        position, don't jump at things. Read the Rule, so to speak, three
        times at least! Look, look, look as mindfully as you can at the truth
        and reality of the situation. I have a friend who has suffered
        terribly in relationships which he ALWAYS insists are just wonderful
        and worth the effort, any effort, no matter who can see otherwise. He
        clings to this denial until they dump him and I DO mean clings. Out of
        fear, he does not really LOOK at the situation.

        Benedictines are not people afraid of commitment, but we live in a
        world where many are. Our witness here must be care and balance. We
        must resolutely walk BETWEEN the extremes of foolhardy haste and
        crippling fear. In the world of today, that is no small witness and
        no easy task. Pull this one off, and you have a done a service to
        many, not just to yourself!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Prayers, please, for A, suffering from sexual addiction, his addict friends haven t heard from him for several days and they re worried that he has gone
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 11, 2007
          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for A, suffering from sexual addiction, his addict friends
          haven't heard from him for several days and they're worried that he has gone
          back to acting out. He has recently lost his job and his housing and he
          suffers from bi-polar disorder. Prayers for Griffin, brain surgery on Monday went
          well, still in a lot of pain. Prayers for a high school student that lost him
          Mom last week. Also for Ronnie, who will have a
          medical procedure done on Friday. Prayers for Suzanne, heart attack in
          January, not well enough to return to work and her family depends on her income,
          she fears becoming an invalid or dying young. Lord, help us all as You know and
          will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
          praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          April 12, August 12, December 12
          Chapter 58: On the Manner of Receiving Sisters

          When she is to be received
          she promises before all in the oratory
          stability,
          fidelity to monastic life
          and obedience.
          This promise she shall make before God and His Saints,
          so that if she should ever act otherwise,
          she may know that she will be condemned by Him whom she mocks.
          Of this promise of hers let her draw up a document
          in the name of the Saints whose relics are there
          and of the Abbess who is present.
          Let her write this document with her own hand;
          or if she is illiterate, let another write it at her request,
          and let the novice put her mark to it.
          Then let her place it with her own hand upon the altar;
          and when she has placed it there,
          let the novice at once intone this verse:
          "Receive me, O Lord, according to Your word, and I shall live:
          and let me not be confounded in my hope" (Ps. 118[119]:116).
          Let the whole community answer this verse three times
          and add the "Glory be to the Father."
          Then let the novice prostrate herself at each one's feet,
          that they may pray for her.
          And from that day forward
          let her be counted as one of the community.
          If she has any property,
          let her either give it beforehand to the poor
          or by solemn donation bestow it on the monastery,
          reserving nothing at all for herself,
          as indeed she knows that from that day forward
          she will no longer have power even over her own body.
          At once, therefore, in the oratory,
          let her be divested of her own clothes which she is wearing
          and dressed in the clothes of the monastery.
          But let the clothes of which she was divested
          be put aside in the wardrobe and kept there.
          Then if she should ever listen to the persuasions of the devil
          and decide to leave the monastery (which God forbid),
          she may be divested of the monastic clothes and cast out.
          Her document, however,
          which the Abbess has taken from the altar,
          shall not be returned to her, but shall be kept in the monastery.

          REFLECTION

          It is thrilling to me to know that, more than 1500 years later, we
          are still doing professions in the way St. Benedict did. A few things
          added, but the elements are there: writing and signing the document,
          placing it on the altar, the Suscipe ("Receive me, O Lord...") are all
          tremendously ancient and holy rites. What a privilege we have to
          belong to such a family.

          The Church approves religious rules. This is the basis for asserting
          that our Holy Rule is inspired by the Holy Spirit, because the Church
          gave its seal of approval. The Church, however, is indubitably older
          and often wiser (in SOME respects, but by no means ALL!) than
          monastic life. It predates every form of optional religious
          commitment. It is the blessing of the Church which makes official
          monastic life possible for any and all of us.

          This is just a prelude to saying that the wisdom of the Church long
          ago stopped people from making solemn vows, a life-long commitment
          difficult to break, right out of novitiate. Not only does this longer
          program protect people, to a certain extent, from making a mistake,
          it also spares the monastery from having a lot of misfits with chapter
          votes running the show. There are many, many I have known who left in
          simple vows that I remain eternally grateful for the fact that they
          were never chapter members!! What a zoo that would have been!

          A year may well have been enough in St. Benedict's time. People had
          vastly shorter life spans, it was a bigger chunk of their lives. They
          also had to grow up more quickly and their options were fewer by far
          than those of our own day.

          Oblates, therefore, can garner a few kernels of truth in this chapter
          about commitment, that bugbear of the post-Word War II generation and
          beyond. Modern people find it terribly hard to commit, some never
          manage it at all. As such, a bit of wisdom older than our own age may
          be very useful in our everyday lives.

          Whether it's a marriage or engagement or job or volunteer chairperson
          position, don't jump at things. Read the Rule, so to speak, three
          times at least! Look, look, look as mindfully as you can at the truth
          and reality of the situation. I have a friend who has suffered
          terribly in relationships which he ALWAYS insists are just wonderful
          and worth the effort, any effort, no matter who can see otherwise. He
          clings to this denial until they dump him and I DO mean clings. Out of
          fear, he does not really LOOK at the situation.

          Benedictines are not people afraid of commitment, but we live in a
          world where many are. Our witness here must be care and balance. We
          must resolutely walk BETWEEN the extremes of foolhardy haste and
          crippling fear. In the world of today, that is no small witness and
          no easy task. Pull this one off, and you have a done a service to
          many, not just to yourself!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA





          ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jeromeleo@stmarysmonastery.org
          +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Roseanne, mid-60 s, who died unexpectedly in her sleep, and for her three sons and her many
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 11, 2008
            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Roseanne, mid-60's, who died unexpectedly in her sleep, and for her three sons and her many friends at St. Andrew's Abbey, Valyermo, where she was an Oblate, as well as her parish American Martyrs.

            For the spiritual, mental and physical welfare of the following, for all their loved ones and all who care for them:

            Bobby and Nikki and their kids. He was laid off, got a new job, but no health insurance now for 6 months. One of the kids has medical needs that will run over $750 a month.

            Amy, that she find the job God wills for her.

            Lord, help us all as You know and
            will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
            praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 12, August 12, December 12
            Chapter 58: On the Manner of Receiving Sisters

            When she is to be received
            she promises before all in the oratory
            stability,
            fidelity to monastic life
            and obedience.
            This promise she shall make before God and His Saints,
            so that if she should ever act otherwise,
            she may know that she will be condemned by Him whom she mocks.
            Of this promise of hers let her draw up a document
            in the name of the Saints whose relics are there
            and of the Abbess who is present.
            Let her write this document with her own hand;
            or if she is illiterate, let another write it at her request,
            and let the novice put her mark to it.
            Then let her place it with her own hand upon the altar;
            and when she has placed it there,
            let the novice at once intone this verse:
            "Receive me, O Lord, according to Your word, and I shall live:
            and let me not be confounded in my hope" (Ps. 118[119]:116).
            Let the whole community answer this verse three times
            and add the "Glory be to the Father."
            Then let the novice prostrate herself at each one's feet,
            that they may pray for her.
            And from that day forward
            let her be counted as one of the community.
            If she has any property,
            let her either give it beforehand to the poor
            or by solemn donation bestow it on the monastery,
            reserving nothing at all for herself,
            as indeed she knows that from that day forward
            she will no longer have power even over her own body.
            At once, therefore, in the oratory,
            let her be divested of her own clothes which she is wearing
            and dressed in the clothes of the monastery.
            But let the clothes of which she was divested
            be put aside in the wardrobe and kept there.
            Then if she should ever listen to the persuasions of the devil
            and decide to leave the monastery (which God forbid),
            she may be divested of the monastic clothes and cast out.
            Her document, however,
            which the Abbess has taken from the altar,
            shall not be returned to her, but shall be kept in the monastery.

            REFLECTION

            It is thrilling to me to know that, more than 1500 years later, we
            are still doing professions in the way St. Benedict did. A few things
            added, but the elements are there: writing and signing the document,
            placing it on the altar, the Suscipe ("Receive me, O Lord...") are all
            tremendously ancient and holy rites. What a privilege we have to
            belong to such a family.

            The Church approves religious rules. This is the basis for asserting
            that our Holy Rule is inspired by the Holy Spirit, because the Church
            gave its seal of approval. The Church, however, is indubitably older
            and often wiser (in SOME respects, but by no means ALL!) than
            monastic life. It predates every form of optional religious
            commitment. It is the blessing of the Church which makes official
            monastic life possible for any and all of us.

            This is just a prelude to saying that the wisdom of the Church long
            ago stopped people from making solemn vows, a life-long commitment
            difficult to break, right out of novitiate. Not only does this longer
            program protect people, to a certain extent, from making a mistake,
            it also spares the monastery from having a lot of misfits with chapter
            votes running the show. There are many, many I have known who left in
            simple vows that I remain eternally grateful for the fact that they
            were never chapter members!! What a zoo that would have been!

            A year may well have been enough in St. Benedict's time. People had
            vastly shorter life spans, it was a bigger chunk of their lives. They
            also had to grow up more quickly and their options were fewer by far
            than those of our own day.

            Oblates, therefore, can garner a few kernels of truth in this chapter
            about commitment, that bugbear of the post-Word War II generation and
            beyond. Modern people find it terribly hard to commit, some never
            manage it at all. As such, a bit of wisdom older than our own age may
            be very useful in our everyday lives.

            Whether it's a marriage or engagement or job or volunteer chairperson
            position, don't jump at things. Read the Rule, so to speak, three
            times at least! Look, look, look as mindfully as you can at the truth
            and reality of the situation. I have a friend who has suffered
            terribly in relationships which he ALWAYS insists are just wonderful
            and worth the effort, any effort, no matter who can see otherwise. He
            clings to this denial until they dump him and I DO mean clings. Out of
            fear, he does not really LOOK at the situation.

            Benedictines are not people afraid of commitment, but we live in a
            world where many are. Our witness here must be care and balance. We
            must resolutely walk BETWEEN the extremes of foolhardy haste and
            crippling fear. In the world of today, that is no small witness and
            no easy task. Pull this one off, and you have a done a service to
            many, not just to yourself!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers for Joey and Carol, expecting their first grandchild in November, and for Katy and Bill, the parents, and for a healthy baby and safe delivery.
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 11, 2016
              +PAX



              Prayers for Joey and Carol, expecting their first grandchild in November,
              and for Katy and Bill, the parents, and for a healthy baby and safe
              delivery.



              Prayers for a speedy recovery for Bonnie L., who recently had surgery.



              Prayers for the eternal rest of Neil's Mom, and for Neil and all her family
              and all who mourn her.



              Prayers for Ginger as she recovers, 20 stitches after a fall.



              Prayers for the eternal rest of Edward Peter, Oblate of St. Benedict
              Monastery, Bristow, VA who died Friday, April 8. Please keep Edward and his
              family in prayer.



              Continued healing prayers for John, for whom we prayed. His gall bladder was
              so infected it was gangrenous and had to be removed the old-fashioned way,
              with open surgery. Very serious surgery and now on massive antibiotics.
              Prayers for his recovery and for his wife, Rita.



              Prayers for Tina, enduring difficult and painful chemotherapy and treatment
              for cancer.



              Prayers for the eternal rest of the 108 dead and the recovery of 400 wounded
              in a Hindu temple fire in Kerala, India, and for the families of all.



              Prayers for Tony, who has been in ICU for 9 days for heart and breathing
              issues with fluid in his lungs. Doctors still looking for ways to help him
              go home. He is heartbroken as he has been the main caregiver of his wife for
              the past 6 years, after she had a stroke . Prayers for both.



              Lord, help us all as You know and
              will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
              praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              April 12, August 12, December 12
              Chapter 58: On the Manner of Receiving Sisters

              When she is to be received
              she promises before all in the oratory
              stability,
              fidelity to monastic life
              and obedience.
              This promise she shall make before God and His Saints,
              so that if she should ever act otherwise,
              she may know that she will be condemned by Him whom she mocks.
              Of this promise of hers let her draw up a document
              in the name of the Saints whose relics are there
              and of the Abbess who is present.
              Let her write this document with her own hand;
              or if she is illiterate, let another write it at her request,
              and let the novice put her mark to it.
              Then let her place it with her own hand upon the altar;
              and when she has placed it there,
              let the novice at once intone this verse:
              "Receive me, O Lord, according to Your word, and I shall live:
              and let me not be confounded in my hope" (Ps. 118[119]:116).
              Let the whole community answer this verse three times
              and add the "Glory be to the Father."
              Then let the novice prostrate herself at each one's feet,
              that they may pray for her.
              And from that day forward
              let her be counted as one of the community.
              If she has any property,
              let her either give it beforehand to the poor
              or by solemn donation bestow it on the monastery,
              reserving nothing at all for herself,
              as indeed she knows that from that day forward
              she will no longer have power even over her own body.
              At once, therefore, in the oratory,
              let her be divested of her own clothes which she is wearing
              and dressed in the clothes of the monastery.
              But let the clothes of which she was divested
              be put aside in the wardrobe and kept there.
              Then if she should ever listen to the persuasions of the devil
              and decide to leave the monastery (which God forbid),
              she may be divested of the monastic clothes and cast out.
              Her document, however,
              which the Abbess has taken from the altar,
              shall not be returned to her, but shall be kept in the monastery.

              REFLECTION

              It is thrilling to me to know that, more than 1500 years later, we
              are still doing professions in the way St. Benedict did. A few things
              added, but the elements are there: writing and signing the document,
              placing it on the altar, the Suscipe ("Receive me, O Lord...") are all
              tremendously ancient and holy rites. What a privilege we have to
              belong to such a family.

              The Church approves religious rules. This is the basis for asserting
              that our Holy Rule is inspired by the Holy Spirit, because the Church
              gave its seal of approval. The Church, however, is indubitably older
              and often wiser than monastic life. It predates every form of optional
              religious
              commitment. It is the blessing of the Church which makes official
              monastic life possible for any and all of us.

              This is just a prelude to saying that the wisdom of the Church long
              ago stopped people from making solemn vows, a life-long commitment
              difficult to break, right out of novitiate. Not only does this longer
              program protect people, to a certain extent, from making a mistake,
              it also spares the monastery from having a lot of misfits with chapter
              votes running the show. There are many I have known who left in
              simple vows that I remain eternally grateful for the fact that they
              were never chapter members!

              A year may well have been enough in St. Benedict's time. People had
              vastly shorter life spans, it was a bigger chunk of their lives. They
              also had to grow up more quickly and their options were fewer by far
              than those of our own day.

              Oblates, therefore, can garner a few kernels of truth in this chapter
              about commitment, that bugbear of the post-Word War II generation and
              beyond. Modern people find it terribly hard to commit, some never
              manage it at all. As such, a bit of wisdom older than our own age may
              be very useful in our everyday lives.

              Whether it's a marriage or engagement or job or volunteer chairperson
              position, don't jump at things. Read the Rule, so to speak, three
              times at least! Look, look, look as mindfully as you can at the truth
              and reality of the situation.

              Benedictines are not people afraid of commitment, but we live in a
              world where many are. Our witness here must be care and balance. We
              must resolutely walk BETWEEN the extremes of foolhardy haste and
              crippling fear. In the world of today, that is no small witness and
              no easy task. Pull this one off, and you have a done a service to
              many, not just to yourself!

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Br. Jerome Leo
              +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Marshall, 70, and for his family and all who mourn him. He was not a particularly religious man, so ardent prayers,
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 12, 2016
                +PAX



                Prayers for the eternal rest of Marshall, 70, and for his family and all who
                mourn him. He was not a particularly religious man, so ardent prayers,
                please.



                Prayers for the eternal rest of John, 72, and for all his family and all who
                mourn him. I don't think he was a churchgoer, so many prayers.



                Please pray for a happy death for, Susie W., 51, dying of pancreatic cancer.
                She has a daughter, Katie, 16 years old, and a son, Robbie, 18. The
                doctors told her husband that there is nothing more they can do. They will
                bring her home tomorrow with hospice care, they don't expect her to live for
                more than a few days.



                Deo gratias and prayers of thanksgiving: Veronica, whom we have prayed for
                in the past, has survived three attacks of cancer in different parts of her
                body and now is celebrating her 50th wedding anniversary with her husband,
                Joe. She can't stop thanking God and thanks all for their prayers.



                Prayers for Marion, recovering from eye surgery.



                Prayers for Gregory E., a special intention.



                Prayers for Sr. Joanna who is giving her oral presentation for her Masters.



                Things are not looking good for A.'s grandbaby, alas. There is some genetic
                problem going on, but nobody seems to quite know what. Everybody is
                understandably stressed and A is terrified that child will die without being
                baptized. Prayers for the whole family please.



                Prayers for Assunta, cancer behind her ear and going into her brain. Had
                surgery and now facing radiation and tests, prayers they got it all.



                Prayers for Denise, who has a uterine tumor, prayers that it is not cancer.



                Prayers fopr the eternal rest of Msgr. Zeng Jingmu OP, Bishop of Yujiang in
                China, died on April 2, aged 96. He had spent the last 23 years in prison
                for remaining faithful to the Catholic Church and refusing to join the
                government controlled Patriotic Association. He was denied a public funeral.



                Prayers for Connie, perforated intestine, doctors say there is nothing more
                they can do. She has a six year old daughter. Prayers for both.



                Judith asks prayers for a stubborn strep infection that won't go away.



                Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
                mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                April 13, August 13, December 13
                Chapter 59: On the Sons of Nobles and of the Poor Who Are Offered

                If anyone of the nobility
                offers his son to God in the monastery
                and the boy is very young,
                let his parents draw up the document which we mentioned above;
                and at the oblation
                let them wrap the document itself and the body's hand in the altar
                cloth.
                That is how they offer him.

                As regards their property,
                they shall promise in the same petition under oath
                that they will never of themselves, or through an intermediary,
                or in any way whatever,
                give him anything
                or provide him with the opportunity of owning anything.
                Or else,
                if they are unwilling to do this,
                and if they want to offer something as an alms to the monastery
                for their advantage,
                let them make a donation
                of the property they wish to give to the monastery,
                reserving the income to themselves if they wish.
                And in this way let everything be barred,
                so that the boy may have no expectations
                whereby (which God forbid) he might be deceived and ruined,
                as we have learned by experience.

                Let those who are less well-to-do make a similar offering.
                But those who have nothing at all
                shall simply draw up the document
                and offer their son before witnesses at the oblation.

                REFLECTION

                It's always nice to read Chapter. 59, because it is the source of our
                having Oblates today. Thanks be to God for the myriad blessings and
                graces that have come to the Benedictine family through Oblates and
                for the graces they have received from their bonds to the Order! It
                is hard for me to imagine where we would be without Oblates.

                Those who are seen help us with labors and goods, and those who are
                unseen, help us with a treasure of prayers whose vastness we dare not
                even guess until we finally see clearly in heaven. In most cases, by
                numbers, Oblates outnumber the professed of the community, so God
                must have known how badly we needed them. It is most likely their
                prayers that kept us going all these years.

                The living and the dead, the strugglers and those already in heaven,
                help us move the great throng of our Order forward through history.
                What heaven must be like! The Oblates there are united to God,
                already freely conversant with St. Benedict, with heroes and heroines
                we can only read about. How delighted they must have been to be
                welcomed by a family far more numerous than they ever imagined.

                They were not strangers to those Benedictines of centuries past. Why?
                Because the saints of the past hold us dear throughout our time of
                trial. They already know us, they have been praying for us all along,
                even if we have not met them yet in person. When I read Anglo-Saxon
                Benedictine history, a favorite hobby of mine, I am just learning their
                names. They already know my name: they have prayed for me for years
                before I even cracked a book.

                When an Oblate joins our ranks, becoming a member of this great
                family, there are graces beyond counting in store. Ours is a family
                of saints, of great holiness. It is also a family of strugglers, the
                mediocre, the halt and lame and the beginning. The communion of
                saints is replicated in miniature in our own Order. All that great sanctity,
                past and present, comes, in the eternal now of heaven, to our aid.
                The weak are carried by the strong. It is easy to forget the miracle
                that signing one little Oblation chart on the altar effects.

                If I could (and did!) write a love song for the habit, I could write one as
                great for Oblates. How much they have changed and enriched my life,
                how deeply I find my days entwined around Oblates from all over the
                world. Prayers and insights shared back and forth, friendships that
                have sprung up in cyberspace, the wonderful gift of having others spread
                far and wide who share the journey with me, these are all gifts of grace to
                me, inestimable gifts! My life would be so much diminished without the
                gifts of light and joy, love and edification that you bring to me. Thanks so
                very, very much!!

                Thank God for our Oblates. Thank God for the chance He led St.
                Benedict to give to them and to ourselves!

                Love and prayers,
                Jerome, OSB
                http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                Petersham, MA













                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • russophile2002
                +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Filomena and for all her family and all who mourn her, especially Fely and Bert. Prayers for the eternal rest of two
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 11

                  +PAX

                   

                  Prayers for the eternal rest of Filomena and for all her family and all who mourn her, especially Fely and Bert.

                   

                  Prayers for the eternal rest of two adults killed in an elementary school classroom shooting in San Bernardino, California. One of those killed was the suspected shooter, and police suspect a murder-suicide. However, two students were also critically wounded. Prayers for their recovery, for the repentance of the killer at the last moment, and for the families of all and all who mourn the dead. Prayers, too, for the other students, who must have been traumatized.

                   

                  Continued prayers for Brittany’s dog, Neo, he probably has cancer.

                   

                  Lord, help us all as You know and
                  will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
                  praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                  April 12, August 12, December 12
                  Chapter 58: On the Manner of Receiving Sisters

                  When she is to be received
                  she promises before all in the oratory
                  stability,
                  fidelity to monastic life
                  and obedience.
                  This promise she shall make before God and His Saints,
                  so that if she should ever act otherwise,
                  she may know that she will be condemned by Him whom she mocks.
                  Of this promise of hers let her draw up a document
                  in the name of the Saints whose relics are there
                  and of the Abbess who is present.
                  Let her write this document with her own hand;
                  or if she is illiterate, let another write it at her request,
                  and let the novice put her mark to it.
                  Then let her place it with her own hand upon the altar;
                  and when she has placed it there,
                  let the novice at once intone this verse:
                  "Receive me, O Lord, according to Your word, and I shall live:
                  and let me not be confounded in my hope" (Ps. 118[119]:116).
                  Let the whole community answer this verse three times
                  and add the "Glory be to the Father."
                  Then let the novice prostrate herself at each one's feet,
                  that they may pray for her.
                  And from that day forward
                  let her be counted as one of the community.
                  If she has any property,
                  let her either give it beforehand to the poor
                  or by solemn donation bestow it on the monastery,
                  reserving nothing at all for herself,
                  as indeed she knows that from that day forward
                  she will no longer have power even over her own body.
                  At once, therefore, in the oratory,
                  let her be divested of her own clothes which she is wearing
                  and dressed in the clothes of the monastery.
                  But let the clothes of which she was divested
                  be put aside in the wardrobe and kept there.
                  Then if she should ever listen to the persuasions of the devil
                  and decide to leave the monastery (which God forbid),
                  she may be divested of the monastic clothes and cast out.
                  Her document, however,
                  which the Abbess has taken from the altar,
                  shall not be returned to her, but shall be kept in the monastery.

                  REFLECTION

                  It is thrilling to me to know that, more than 1500 years later, we
                  are still doing professions in the way St. Benedict did. A few things
                  added, but the elements are there: writing and signing the document,
                  placing it on the altar, the Suscipe ("Receive me, O Lord...") are all
                  tremendously ancient and holy rites. What a privilege we have to
                  belong to such a family.

                  The Church approves religious rules. This and the fact that canonized

                  Saints have lived under our Holy Rule are  the basis for asserting
                  that our Holy Rule is inspired by the Holy Spirit, because the Church
                  gave its seal of approval. The Church, however, is indubitably older
                  and often wiser than monastic life. It predates every form of optional
                  religious commitment. It is the blessing of the Church which makes official
                  monastic life possible for any and all of us.

                  This is just a prelude to saying that the wisdom of the Church long
                  ago stopped people from making solemn vows, a life-long commitment
                  difficult to break, right out of novitiate. Not only does this longer
                  program protect people, to a certain extent, from making a mistake,
                  it also spares the monastery from having a lot of misfits with chapter
                  votes running the show. There are many I have known who left in
                  simple vows that I remain eternally grateful for the fact that they
                  were never chapter members!

                  A year may well have been enough in St. Benedict's time. People had
                  vastly shorter life spans, it was a bigger chunk of their lives. They
                  also had to grow up more quickly and their options were fewer by far
                  than those of our own day.

                  Oblates, therefore, can garner a few kernels of truth in this chapter
                  about commitment, that bugbear of the post-Word War II generation and
                  beyond. Modern people find it terribly hard to commit, some never
                  manage it at all. As such, a bit of wisdom older than our own age may
                  be very useful in our everyday lives.

                  Whether it's a marriage or engagement or job or volunteer chairperson
                  position, don't jump at things. Read the Rule, so to speak, three
                  times at least! Look, look, look as mindfully as you can at the truth
                  and reality of the situation.

                  Benedictines are not people afraid of commitment, but we live in a
                  world where many are. Our witness here must be care and balance. We
                  must resolutely walk BETWEEN the extremes of foolhardy haste and
                  crippling fear. In the world of today, that is no small witness and
                  no easy task. Pull this one off, and you have a done a service to
                  many, not just to yourself!

                  Love and prayers,
                  Jerome, OSB
                  http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                  Petersham, MA

                   

                   


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