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Re: [mendenyo] Re: Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and research!

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  • Samwel Kongere
    Yes inclusive to all, Immense thanks to all your suggestions and mails. There are laws and regulations regarding research findings and putting them in the
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 11, 2008
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      Yes inclusive to all,
      Immense thanks to all your suggestions and mails.
      There are laws and regulations regarding research
      findings and putting them in the public domain is a
      breach of this. I know of these standards and giving
      these data to a third party will mean you are taking
      risks against rules laid by WHO and scientists. Most
      of the questionaires are confidential. The only
      acceptable language here is % and degrees. There are
      also other measures which must be adhered to. I dearly
      agree with Graham.
      Have a thoughtful week! Samwel.
      --- graham <DIYSolar@...> wrote:

      > Dear Andrius and others,
      >
      > I have already started making arrangements to test
      > solar-powered fans with Peter.
      > I imagine it would be best to have someone on the
      > spot to do any co-ordination, etc
      > with other experiments.
      >
      > It might be useful to test pepper but from what I
      > have read it is
      > extremely difficult to research malaria as there are
      > so many many factors to be
      > considered!
      >
      > Graham
      >
      >
      > Peter Burgess, Graham Knight,
      >
      > Would one or both of you be willing to partner
      > with Peter Ongele on a
      > malaria related $100 project which I might sponsor
      > (perhaps reviewing the
      > data they have collected, or trying out peppers as
      > an insecticide, or
      > trying out solar powered fans?)
      >
      > Perhaps one of our Africans might be Peter's
      > partner? That's possible as
      > well. We simply need somebody interested and
      > willing to exchange letters
      > in our groups so that we can all see the progress
      > of Peter's explorations.
      >
      > Thank you all for your letters!
      >
      > Andrius Kulikauskas
      > Minciu Sodas
      > http://www.ms.lt
      > ms@...
      >
      > > Dear All,
      > >
      > > I know next to nothing about malaria but I did a
      > short investigation some
      > > years
      > > ago as I had read that bed nets are often
      > ineffective.
      > > Not because mosquitoes get through the netting
      > but because the 'climate'
      > > under
      > > a net can be so appalling that many, especially
      > children, rather remove
      > > the net and
      > > risk the consequences.
      > > A recent googling shows this is still widely
      > reported.
      > >
      > > In consequence I tried to find people interested
      > in using pv solar-powered
      > > fans
      > > but only now have I found someone, Peter Ongele,
      > who is interested in
      > > testing
      > > this possibility!
      > >
      > > Graham
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Dear Colleagues
      > >
      > > I am delighted that this malaria conversation is
      > moving ahead.
      > >
      > > There is a huge body of knowledge about malaria
      > ... and most people
      > > are only accessing a very small bit of it. One
      > of the challenges is to
      > > *manage* this vast knowledge resource and do
      > things that work.
      > >
      > > I see the goal as being to reduce the burden of
      > malaria in the area as
      > > fast as possible and at as low cost as possible.
      > In order to manage
      > > this there is a need to figure out what works
      > and what does not.
      > >
      > > As I understand it, insecticide treated bednets
      > have been distributed
      > > in the area ... but malaria persists. Why is
      > this? Is this a fact, or
      > > part of a fact? There are some questions that
      > need to get answered:
      > > .... how many bednets were distributed and when?
      > > .... how many in the area population? How many
      > bednets per person ...
      > > per household?
      > > .... what was the malaria like before bednets?
      > What is it like after
      > > bednets?
      > > .... are bednets being used?
      > >
      > > If there is a health clinic (or clinics) in the
      > area ... what are the
      > > month by month cases of malaria? Is the number
      > going up or down? What
      > > about seasonality? What about rainfall and
      > temperature and humidity?
      > >
      > > Under 5 child mortality and pregnant women (PW)
      > are vulnerable to
      > > malaria mortality. Any changes over time for
      > under 5 and PW mortality.
      > >
      > > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria
      > parasites in the
      > > human population? Is this being measured at the
      > clinic or clinics?
      > > What methods are being used.
      > >
      > > Is there any source control of the mosquitoes?
      > What is being done?
      > >
      > > Is there any change in mosquito population? Are
      > there any mosquito
      > > traps? How many? Where are they? What results?
      > Is there daily data ...
      > > or weekly? How does this look month by month?
      > >
      > > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria
      > in the mosquito
      > > population? Who is measuring this?
      > >
      > > Is interior residual spraying (IRS) being used?
      > What chemical is being
      > > used? What spray rates? When is it being done?
      > >
      > > There are many questions ... essentially a lot
      > of little questions
      > > that give data ... and the data will give
      > answers. My hope is that one
      > > of these days we will start to be collecting the
      > dots in a coherent
      > > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots
      > and get the right best
      > > answer.
      > >
      > > But before that will happen, there is one last
      > set of data. How much
      > > do things cost? How can everything that needs to
      > be done be done in
      > > the least cost manner (this is cost efficiency).
      > At the same time,
      > > least cost is not the ultimate goal ... most
      > cost effective is the
      > > goal ... what activities give the biggest
      > reduction in the burden of
      > > malaria?
      > >
      > > This is a multi-variate problem ... not easy to
      > get a perfect answer
      > > ... but quite easy to get something a lot better
      > than what has
      > > prevailed in the past.
      > >
      > > Hope this is helpful ... I realize that I should
      > have been more
      > > helpful over the past weeks and months ... but I
      > am trying to pull
      > > together a response to the WHO Global Malaria
      > Action Plan (WHO-GMAP)
      > > using what we refer to as Integrated Malaria
      > Management Best Practice
      > > (IMM-BP). My hope is this will help to move the
      > focus of malaria
      > > control activities from Washington and Geneva to
      > the African Community
      > > and the local professionals who are most engaged
      > and concerned about
      > > progress ... and at the same time be a good
      > basis for ongoing
      > > financial support for malaria control even
      > though the capital markets
      > > have imploded.
      > >
      > > Sincerely
      > >
      > > Peter Burgess
      > >
      > > On Wed, Dec 10, 2008 at 12:26 AM, Kennedy Owino
      > > <nafsiafricaacro@...> wrote:
      > > > Hello Sam and all,
      > > >
      > > > I admire Great thoughts circulating here on
      > how we can help in
      > > combating the
      > > > greatest world killer which is affecting Kenya
      > big time.
      >
      === message truncated ===


      http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=5VvLrzLaXHc0i_2bh5XdOTxA_3d_3d
    • Kennedy Owino
      Dear all, I am happy about the discussion gaining momentum here and hope that our thoughts will provide certain solutions. Thanks Tom, Dennis and Dan for your
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 11, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear all,

        I am happy about the discussion gaining momentum here and hope that our thoughts will provide certain solutions.
        Thanks Tom, Dennis and Dan for your views.
        Ricardo, you asked what type of pepper my Grand Ma used.
        It was a Red pepper (not round but finger shaped)- i cant find appropriate word to describe it.

        Peter Burgess says,
         "There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions
        > that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one
        > of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent
        > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best
        > answer"
        Peter further asks what Malaria used to be like before the advent of bed nets in Kenya and how it is now.
        Another question may be, Why is there still wide spread cases of malaria in Kenya, particularly around the Lake Victoria region yet there has been massive campaigns and mosquito nets distribution?

        My attention was drawn to a particular publication in one of today's dailies touching on the topic of Malaria.
        It said that , a study conducted by Maseno University, Nagasaki University of Japan, and I.C.P.E also published in Malaria Journal (http://www.malariajournal.com/) revealed sad findings in Nyanza Province of Kenya (around lake Victoria) that hampers the fight against malaria.
        There is wide spread misuse of bed nets, Bed nets intended for bedrooms end up on the fishing beaches.
        Poor fisher men who can not afford fishing nets use new distributed bed nets to fish and also they have opted to dry small fish (omena) on the nets.
        The emerging trend is mostly happening in Luanda Beaches of Sondo District.
        This is raising concerns among the public Health experts and the Fisheries Department.
        The habbit reverses the gains already made in fighting against malaria, the misuse also poses a risk to the fish stocks.
        The District has received a sabstantial number of nets from the Goverment and N.G.O's.
        This year alone over 20,000 pieces were distributed.
        More stastistics can be found  at http://www.malariajournal.com/

        The big question here is, Do you think Poverty and Ignorance also hampers efforts to contain Malaria?
        How can we reverse the trends where Bed nets end up being misused?

        All the best in our positive quests,

        Ken Owino
        Nafsi Africa Acrobats
        www.nafsiafrica.org
        +254723568251



        --- On Thu, 12/11/08, graham <DIYSolar@...> wrote:
        From: graham <DIYSolar@...>
        Subject: [mendenyo] Re: Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and research!
        To: mendenyo@yahoogroups.com, holistichelping@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, December 11, 2008, 2:57 AM

        Dear Andrius and others,
         
        I have already started making arrangements to test solar-powered fans with Peter.
        I imagine it would be best to have someone on the spot to do any co-ordination, etc
        with other experiments.
         
        It might be useful to test pepper but from what I have read it is
        extremely difficult to research malaria as there are so many many factors to be
        considered!
         
        Graham

         

        Peter Burgess, Graham Knight,

        Would one or both of you be willing to partner with Peter Ongele on a
        malaria related $100 project which I might sponsor (perhaps reviewing the
        data they have collected, or trying out peppers as an insecticide, or
        trying out solar powered fans?)

        Perhaps one of our Africans might be Peter's partner? That's possible as
        well. We simply need somebody interested and willing to exchange letters
        in our groups so that we can all see the progress of Peter's explorations.

        Thank you all for your letters!

        Andrius Kulikauskas
        Minciu Sodas
        http://www.ms. lt
        ms@...

        > Dear All,
        >
        > I know next to nothing about malaria but I did a short investigation some
        > years
        > ago as I had read that bed nets are often ineffective.
        > Not because mosquitoes get through the netting but because the 'climate'
        > under
        > a net can be so appalling that many, especially children, rather remove
        > the net and
        > risk the consequences.
        > A recent googling shows this is still widely reported.
        >
        > In consequence I tried to find people interested in using pv solar-powered
        > fans
        > but only now have I found someone, Peter Ongele, who is interested in
        > testing
        > this possibility!
        >
        > Graham
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Dear Colleagues
        >
        > I am delighted that this malaria conversation is moving ahead.
        >
        > There is a huge body of knowledge about malaria ... and most people
        > are only accessing a very small bit of it. One of the challenges is to
        > *manage* this vast knowledge resource and do things that work.
        >
        > I see the goal as being to reduce the burden of malaria in the area as
        > fast as possible and at as low cost as possible. In order to manage
        > this there is a need to figure out what works and what does not.
        >
        > As I understand it, insecticide treated bednets have been distributed
        > in the area ... but malaria persists. Why is this? Is this a fact, or
        > part of a fact? There are some questions that need to get answered:
        > .... how many bednets were distributed and when?
        > .... how many in the area population? How many bednets per person ...
        > per household?
        > .... what was the malaria like before bednets? What is it like after
        > bednets?
        > .... are bednets being used?
        >
        > If there is a health clinic (or clinics) in the area ... what are the
        > month by month cases of malaria? Is the number going up or down? What
        > about seasonality? What about rainfall and temperature and humidity?
        >
        > Under 5 child mortality and pregnant women (PW) are vulnerable to
        > malaria mortality. Any changes over time for under 5 and PW mortality.
        >
        > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria parasites in the
        > human population? Is this being measured at the clinic or clinics?
        > What methods are being used.
        >
        > Is there any source control of the mosquitoes? What is being done?
        >
        > Is there any change in mosquito population? Are there any mosquito
        > traps? How many? Where are they? What results? Is there daily data ...
        > or weekly? How does this look month by month?
        >
        > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria in the mosquito
        > population? Who is measuring this?
        >
        > Is interior residual spraying (IRS) being used? What chemical is being
        > used? What spray rates? When is it being done?
        >
        > There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions
        > that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one
        > of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent
        > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best
        > answer.
        >
        > But before that will happen, there is one last set of data. How much
        > do things cost? How can everything that needs to be done be done in
        > the least cost manner (this is cost efficiency). At the same time,
        > least cost is not the ultimate goal ... most cost effective is the
        > goal ... what activities give the biggest reduction in the burden of
        > malaria?
        >
        > This is a multi-variate problem ... not easy to get a perfect answer
        > ... but quite easy to get something a lot better than what has
        > prevailed in the past.
        >
        > Hope this is helpful ... I realize that I should have been more
        > helpful over the past weeks and months ... but I am trying to pull
        > together a response to the WHO Global Malaria Action Plan (WHO-GMAP)
        > using what we refer to as Integrated Malaria Management Best Practice
        > (IMM-BP). My hope is this will help to move the focus of malaria
        > control activities from Washington and Geneva to the African Community
        > and the local professionals who are most engaged and concerned about
        > progress ... and at the same time be a good basis for ongoing
        > financial support for malaria control even though the capital markets
        > have imploded.
        >
        > Sincerely
        >
        > Peter Burgess
        >
        > On Wed, Dec 10, 2008 at 12:26 AM, Kennedy Owino
        > <nafsiafricaacro@ yahoo.com> wrote:
        > > Hello Sam and all,
        > >
        > > I admire Great thoughts circulating here on how we can help in
        > combating the
        > > greatest world killer which is affecting Kenya big time.
        > > Sam, a thought just crossed my mind, pepper was being used
        > traditionally to
        > > kill insects like coackroaches and also mosquitos.
        > > Grandmothers used to drop some berries or fruits of pepper into the
        > open
        > > fire in the traditional three stone cooking stove and in a shortwhile
        > all
        > > disturbing "dudus" (mosquitoes and coakroaches would be dead).
        > > A cultural focuss or an approach can be taken on researching on if
        > some form
        > > of insecticide can be developed out of this.
        > > Better still people in the villages would use this cultural/outdated
        > method
        > > besides the use of Bed nets to control mosquitoes.
        > > I doubt if using pepper should have any negative impact on the
        > environment.
        > >
        > > Sam, i respect that you put your time and experience into finding ways
        > of
        > > dealing with the spread of malaria.
        > > Malaria should be a big concern, last week i had to donate blood to an
        > > American (a friend of a friend) who was dying in Nairobi Hospital
        > because of
        > > Celebral Malarial infection he got while on vaccation in Tanzania.
        > > He was quickly evacuated to Nairobi, he was on support unit and
        > urgently
        > > required blood platellets (if that is the right spelling).
        > > At first he was wrongly diagnosed to be suuffering from typhoid, it
        > was
        > > serious , his parents flew in from the States and evenually he had to
        > be
        > > flown out to seek proper treatment in America.
        > > Anyway, this shows how serious this may be not only to people living
        > in
        > > Africa but also to visitors and tourists as well.
        > >
        > > I laud and support your point- Ending malaria as a volume of thinking
        > and
        > > research- but most of the solutions lies with us, just a little bit of
        > > thinking.
        > >
        > > Have a thoughtful day!
        > >
        > > Ken Owino
        > > NAfsi Africa Acrobats
        > > www.nafsiafrica. org
        > > +254723568251
        > >
        > >
        > > --- On Mon, 12/8/08, Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com> wrote:
        > >
        > > From: Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com>
        > > Subject: [mendenyo] Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and
        > research!
        > > To: Mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com
        > > Date: Monday, December 8, 2008, 6:41 PM
        > >
        > > Hello Chris, Peter, Graham and all,
        > >
        > > I am crossinly happy with your all thoughtful messages
        > > and links. I trust our valuable time and commitment
        > > will give us wonderful answers/results.
        > >
        > > I carried out personal talks with the public health
        > > department in our district, on how combined efforts
        > > can help end malaria. With the Rusinga island malaria
        > > project, data, mosquito nets will help reduce malaria
        > > but most of it are studies which only help scientists
        > > and educationist not the low class villagers.
        > > With my own a wareness on malaria cases. There are two
        > > districts which benefited to a substancial change in
        > > fighting and ending malaria. The chemical used in
        > > Rachuonyo and Kisii districts will be introduced in
        > > other areas. This is a government effort.
        > > We are organizing a consortium in Kisumu on July 1-3rd
        > > 2009 to bring a real local combined a wareness on
        > > matters of sustainabillity. Once the budget is
        > > finalised we will send invitations to attendees.
        > > We need your contributions which can be sent to me or
        > > Tom Ochuka, as we are planning.
        > > Cheers to all!
        > > Samwel.
        > >
        > > http://www.surveymo nkey.com/ s.aspx?sm= 5VvLrzLaXHc0i_ 2bh5XdOTxA_
        > 3d_3d
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
        >
        >
        >
        > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com
        > Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.16/1842 - Release Date:
        > 12/10/2008 6:53 PM
        >

        --
        Minciu Sodas
        http://www.ms. lt
        ms@...
        +1 312 618 3345



        No virus found in this incoming message.
        Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com
        Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.16/1842 - Release Date: 12/10/2008 6:53 PM

      • tom ochuka
        Dear Kenn,   Thanks for this we really need to see the best way and easier,affordable way of doing it,there is also the house people live ,some have no
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 11, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear Kenn,
            Thanks for this we really need to see the best way and easier,affordable way of doing it,there is also the house people live ,some have no windows or very tiny windows with no light this too keep mosquitoes inside then waiting for the bllod to such at night once they are in the houses they dont go out,our grandmother used pepper and also sending them away by wavingarround the blanket before going to bed .
          Because one house was futher tahn the other.
          Houses are congested and families atre big....can we satr by educating the comunty on the dangers and prevention actually treating malaria is very costy and after treatmnet it leaves one actually with only some percentage of recovery you cant be the real you.
          Thats why Kenns friend left for another country.
          Kenn tahnks for your brilliant ideas ,Malaria in kericho is different from what we have in kisumu,ot and cold places.
          Nets must also be trated regularly and this require REAL NETS..Not just ones taht will tearout in one sleep.
          There is too aneed to cover water containers and bring preventive medicine.
          I WANT TO CONTINUE IN THIS DISCUSSION..Andrius what do you think?CAN 100 dollars
          do this?
          Thanks.
          TOM OCHUKA.

          --- On Thu, 12/11/08, Kennedy Owino <nafsiafricaacro@...> wrote:
          From: Kennedy Owino <nafsiafricaacro@...>
          Subject: [holistichelping] Misuse of Bednets
          To: mendenyo@yahoogroups.com, holistichelping@yahoogroups.com, "nafsi Afrika acrobats" <nafsiafrikasaana@yahoogroups.com>, "learning from each other" <learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Thursday, December 11, 2008, 6:08 AM

          Dear all,

          I am happy about the discussion gaining momentum here and hope that our thoughts will provide certain solutions.
          Thanks Tom, Dennis and Dan for your views.
          Ricardo, you asked what type of pepper my Grand Ma used.
          It was a Red pepper (not round but finger shaped)- i cant find appropriate word to describe it.

          Peter Burgess says,
           "There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions
          > that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one
          > of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent
          > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best
          > answer"
          Peter further asks what Malaria used to be like before the advent of bed nets in Kenya and how it is now.
          Another question may be, Why is there still wide spread cases of malaria in Kenya, particularly around the Lake Victoria region yet there has been massive campaigns and mosquito nets distribution?

          My attention was drawn to a particular publication in one of today's dailies touching on the topic of Malaria.
          It said that , a study conducted by Maseno University, Nagasaki University of Japan, and I.C.P.E also published in Malaria Journal (http://www. malariajournal. com/) revealed sad findings in Nyanza Province of Kenya (around lake Victoria) that hampers the fight against malaria.
          There is wide spread misuse of bed nets, Bed nets intended for bedrooms end up on the fishing beaches.
          Poor fisher men who can not afford fishing nets use new distributed bed nets to fish and also they have opted to dry small fish (omena) on the nets.
          The emerging trend is mostly happening in Luanda Beaches of Sondo District.
          This is raising concerns among the public Health experts and the Fisheries Department.
          The habbit reverses the gains already made in fighting against malaria, the misuse also poses a risk to the fish stocks.
          The District has received a sabstantial number of nets from the Goverment and N.G.O's.
          This year alone over 20,000 pieces were distributed.
          More stastistics can be found  at http://www.malariaj ournal.com/

          The big question here is, Do you think Poverty and Ignorance also hampers efforts to contain Malaria?
          How can we reverse the trends where Bed nets end up being misused?

          All the best in our positive quests,

          Ken Owino
          Nafsi Africa Acrobats
          www.nafsiafrica. org
          +254723568251



          --- On Thu, 12/11/08, graham <DIYSolar@btinternet .com> wrote:
          From: graham <DIYSolar@btinternet .com>
          Subject: [mendenyo] Re: Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and research!
          To: mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com, holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Thursday, December 11, 2008, 2:57 AM

          Dear Andrius and others,
           
          I have already started making arrangements to test solar-powered fans with Peter.
          I imagine it would be best to have someone on the spot to do any co-ordination, etc
          with other experiments.
           
          It might be useful to test pepper but from what I have read it is
          extremely difficult to research malaria as there are so many many factors to be
          considered!
           
          Graham

           
          Peter Burgess, Graham Knight,

          Would one or both of you be willing to partner with Peter Ongele on a
          malaria related $100 project which I might sponsor (perhaps reviewing the
          data they have collected, or trying out peppers as an insecticide, or
          trying out solar powered fans?)

          Perhaps one of our Africans might be Peter's partner? That's possible as
          well. We simply need somebody interested and willing to exchange letters
          in our groups so that we can all see the progress of Peter's explorations.

          Thank you all for your letters!

          Andrius Kulikauskas
          Minciu Sodas
          http://www.ms. lt
          ms@...

          > Dear All,
          >
          > I know next to nothing about malaria but I did a short investigation some
          > years
          > ago as I had read that bed nets are often ineffective.
          > Not because mosquitoes get through the netting but because the 'climate'
          > under
          > a net can be so appalling that many, especially children, rather remove
          > the net and
          > risk the consequences.
          > A recent googling shows this is still widely reported.
          >
          > In consequence I tried to find people interested in using pv solar-powered
          > fans
          > but only now have I found someone, Peter Ongele, who is interested in
          > testing
          > this possibility!
          >
          > Graham
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Dear Colleagues
          >
          > I am delighted that this malaria conversation is moving ahead.
          >
          > There is a huge body of knowledge about malaria ... and most people
          > are only accessing a very small bit of it. One of the challenges is to
          > *manage* this vast knowledge resource and do things that work.
          >
          > I see the goal as being to reduce the burden of malaria in the area as
          > fast as possible and at as low cost as possible. In order to manage
          > this there is a need to figure out what works and what does not.
          >
          > As I understand it, insecticide treated bednets have been distributed
          > in the area ... but malaria persists. Why is this? Is this a fact, or
          > part of a fact? There are some questions that need to get answered:
          > .... how many bednets were distributed and when?
          > .... how many in the area population? How many bednets per person ...
          > per household?
          > .... what was the malaria like before bednets? What is it like after
          > bednets?
          > .... are bednets being used?
          >
          > If there is a health clinic (or clinics) in the area ... what are the
          > month by month cases of malaria? Is the number going up or down? What
          > about seasonality? What about rainfall and temperature and humidity?
          >
          > Under 5 child mortality and pregnant women (PW) are vulnerable to
          > malaria mortality. Any changes over time for under 5 and PW mortality.
          >
          > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria parasites in the
          > human population? Is this being measured at the clinic or clinics?
          > What methods are being used.
          >
          > Is there any source control of the mosquitoes? What is being done?
          >
          > Is there any change in mosquito population? Are there any mosquito
          > traps? How many? Where are they? What results? Is there daily data ...
          > or weekly? How does this look month by month?
          >
          > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria in the mosquito
          > population? Who is measuring this?
          >
          > Is interior residual spraying (IRS) being used? What chemical is being
          > used? What spray rates? When is it being done?
          >
          > There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions
          > that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one
          > of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent
          > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best
          > answer.
          >
          > But before that will happen, there is one last set of data. How much
          > do things cost? How can everything that needs to be done be done in
          > the least cost manner (this is cost efficiency). At the same time,
          > least cost is not the ultimate goal ... most cost effective is the
          > goal ... what activities give the biggest reduction in the burden of
          > malaria?
          >
          > This is a multi-variate problem ... not easy to get a perfect answer
          > ... but quite easy to get something a lot better than what has
          > prevailed in the past.
          >
          > Hope this is helpful ... I realize that I should have been more
          > helpful over the past weeks and months ... but I am trying to pull
          > together a response to the WHO Global Malaria Action Plan (WHO-GMAP)
          > using what we refer to as Integrated Malaria Management Best Practice
          > (IMM-BP). My hope is this will help to move the focus of malaria
          > control activities from Washington and Geneva to the African Community
          > and the local professionals who are most engaged and concerned about
          > progress ... and at the same time be a good basis for ongoing
          > financial support for malaria control even though the capital markets
          > have imploded.
          >
          > Sincerely
          >
          > Peter Burgess
          >
          > On Wed, Dec 10, 2008 at 12:26 AM, Kennedy Owino
          > <nafsiafricaacro@ yahoo.com> wrote:
          > > Hello Sam and all,
          > >
          > > I admire Great thoughts circulating here on how we can help in
          > combating the
          > > greatest world killer which is affecting Kenya big time.
          > > Sam, a thought just crossed my mind, pepper was being used
          > traditionally to
          > > kill insects like coackroaches and also mosquitos.
          > > Grandmothers used to drop some berries or fruits of pepper into the
          > open
          > > fire in the traditional three stone cooking stove and in a shortwhile
          > all
          > > disturbing "dudus" (mosquitoes and coakroaches would be dead).
          > > A cultural focuss or an approach can be taken on researching on if
          > some form
          > > of insecticide can be developed out of this.
          > > Better still people in the villages would use this cultural/outdated
          > method
          > > besides the use of Bed nets to control mosquitoes.
          > > I doubt if using pepper should have any negative impact on the
          > environment.
          > >
          > > Sam, i respect that you put your time and experience into finding ways
          > of
          > > dealing with the spread of malaria.
          > > Malaria should be a big concern, last week i had to donate blood to an
          > > American (a friend of a friend) who was dying in Nairobi Hospital
          > because of
          > > Celebral Malarial infection he got while on vaccation in Tanzania.
          > > He was quickly evacuated to Nairobi, he was on support unit and
          > urgently
          > > required blood platellets (if that is the right spelling).
          > > At first he was wrongly diagnosed to be suuffering from typhoid, it
          > was
          > > serious , his parents flew in from the States and evenually he had to
          > be
          > > flown out to seek proper treatment in America.
          > > Anyway, this shows how serious this may be not only to people living
          > in
          > > Africa but also to visitors and tourists as well.
          > >
          > > I laud and support your point- Ending malaria as a volume of thinking
          > and
          > > research- but most of the solutions lies with us, just a little bit of
          > > thinking.
          > >
          > > Have a thoughtful day!
          > >
          > > Ken Owino
          > > NAfsi Africa Acrobats
          > > www.nafsiafrica. org
          > > +254723568251
          > >
          > >
          > > --- On Mon, 12/8/08, Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com> wrote:
          > >
          > > From: Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com>
          > > Subject: [mendenyo] Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and
          > research!
          > > To: Mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com
          > > Date: Monday, December 8, 2008, 6:41 PM
          > >
          > > Hello Chris, Peter, Graham and all,
          > >
          > > I am crossinly happy with your all thoughtful messages
          > > and links. I trust our valuable time and commitment
          > > will give us wonderful answers/results.
          > >
          > > I carried out personal talks with the public health
          > > department in our district, on how combined efforts
          > > can help end malaria. With the Rusinga island malaria
          > > project, data, mosquito nets will help reduce malaria
          > > but most of it are studies which only help scientists
          > > and educationist not the low class villagers.
          > > With my own a wareness on malaria cases. There are two
          > > districts which benefited to a substancial change in
          > > fighting and ending malaria. The chemical used in
          > > Rachuonyo and Kisii districts will be introduced in
          > > other areas. This is a government effort.
          > > We are organizing a consortium in Kisumu on July 1-3rd
          > > 2009 to bring a real local combined a wareness on
          > > matters of sustainabillity. Once the budget is
          > > finalised we will send invitations to attendees.
          > > We need your contributions which can be sent to me or
          > > Tom Ochuka, as we are planning.
          > > Cheers to all!
          > > Samwel.
          > >
          > > http://www.surveymo nkey.com/ s.aspx?sm= 5VvLrzLaXHc0i_ 2bh5XdOTxA_
          > 3d_3d
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
          >
          >
          >
          > No virus found in this incoming message.
          > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com
          > Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.16/1842 - Release Date:
          > 12/10/2008 6:53 PM
          >

          --
          Minciu Sodas
          http://www.ms. lt
          ms@...
          +1 312 618 3345



          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com
          Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.16/1842 - Release Date: 12/10/2008 6:53 PM


        • Peter Burgess
          Dear Colleagues There are many studies over the years that show bednets reduce mortality from malaria, especially the mortality of young children and pregnant
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 12, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Colleagues

            There are many studies over the years that show bednets reduce
            mortality from malaria, especially the mortality of young children and
            pregnant women. However, the best cases are a reduction in mortality
            of something in the range of 40% to 60% ... which means that there is
            still a lot of death arising from malaria ... not to mention a lot of
            death from other preventable childhood diseases.

            A best practice strategy is going to be one where available resources
            are used in the most cost effective way. The heavy focus on bednets is
            almost certainly not the most cost effective ... and now that a very
            large amount of money has been used in this manner, it is becoming
            clear that a strategy based on bednets is not working particularly
            well and is not going to be sustained by the donors for ever, and
            without donors, the malaria bednet program will die.

            A malaria management program should have a community focus and do what
            works in the community and is based on surveillance for entomological
            knowledge about the community, screening for medical information, and
            a full range of control interventions: medical treatment, source
            control, vector control and personal protection. The key is to get the
            malaria transmission rate to be very low and to keep it low. Malaria
            can be reduced rapidly ... but it comes back just as fast. This is a
            dynamic problem that needs day to day action to keep it under control.

            I like to contrast what is recommended for malaria in Africa where
            thousands of children die every day from malaria with the control of
            West Nile Virus in the USA where the potential for death is big, but
            the actual death is perhaps 40 (???) a year.

            From what I am learning IRS and source control (larvaciding) should be
            a big part of malaria management best practice. They seem to be much
            more cost effective than bednets ... where effectiveness is the
            reduction in the malaria burden in society.

            Sadly ... data are not flowing ... and data based analysis is
            difficult. Opinion is not a good basis for decision making.

            Sincerely

            Peter
            ____________
            Peter Burgess
            The Transparency and Accountability Network: Tr-Ac-Net in New York
            www.tr-ac-net.org
            Community Accountancy
            Integrated Malaria Management Consortium (IMMC)
            917 432 1191 or 212 772 6918 peterbnyc@...

            On Thu, Dec 11, 2008 at 9:08 AM, Kennedy Owino
            <nafsiafricaacro@...> wrote:
            > Dear all,
            >
            > I am happy about the discussion gaining momentum here and hope that our thoughts will provide certain solutions.
            > Thanks Tom, Dennis and Dan for your views.
            > Ricardo, you asked what type of pepper my Grand Ma used.
            > It was a Red pepper (not round but finger shaped)- i cant find appropriate word to describe it.
            >
            > Peter Burgess says,
            > "There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best answer"
            > Peter further asks what Malaria used to be like before the advent of bed nets in Kenya and how it is now.

            > Another question may be, Why is there still wide spread cases of malaria in Kenya, particularly around the Lake Victoria region yet there has been massive campaigns and mosquito nets distribution?
            >
            > My attention was drawn to a particular publication in one of today's dailies touching on the topic of Malaria.

            > It said that , a study conducted by Maseno University, Nagasaki University of Japan, and I.C.P.E also published in Malaria Journal (http://www.malariajournal.com/) revealed sad findings in Nyanza Province of
            Kenya (around lake Victoria) that hampers the fight against malaria.

            > There is wide spread misuse of bed nets, Bed nets intended for bedrooms end up on the fishing beaches.
            Poor fisher men who can not afford fishing nets use new distributed
            bed nets to fish and also they have opted to dry small fish (omena) on
            the nets.

            > The emerging trend is mostly happening in Luanda Beaches of Sondo District. This is raising concerns among the public Health experts and the Fisheries Department.

            > The habit reverses the gains already made in fighting against malaria, the misuse also poses a risk to the fish stocks.

            > The District has received a substantial number of nets from the Goverment and N.G.O's. This year alone over 20,000 pieces were distributed. More stastistics can be found at http://www.malariajournal.com/
            >
            > The big question here is, Do you think Poverty and Ignorance also hampers efforts to contain Malaria?

            > How can we reverse the trends where Bed nets end up being misused?

            > All the best in our positive quests,

            > Ken Owino
            > Nafsi Africa Acrobats
            > www.nafsiafrica.org
            > +254723568251
          • Mark Roest
            Dear all, The misuse of bednets helps to show that we need to look at the whole pattern of how we live, what nature and our work and culture demand, and how we
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 13, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Dear all,

              The misuse of bednets helps to show that we need to look at the whole pattern of how we live, what nature and our work and culture demand, and how we might respond to all of that.

              We should ask some questions in the community; call people together for meetings and ask:
              what other needs do we have that nets that are not treated with chemicals can serve?
              do we have a balanced, nutritious diet? if not, have we stopped growing and eating some plants our ancestors used to eat? have we changed our diet in other ways?
              do the traditional herbal healers use any plants that we could grow for everyone to use to increase resistance to malaria, to help manage or cure it, or to drive mosquitos away (like pepper) or kill them or their larvae, with their guidance?
              where do the mosquitos grow? (make a map, and ask everyone in the community contribute any sightings of mosquito larvae, and of water that might harbor mosquito larvae)
              are there any fish that eat mosquitos or their larvae that are native to the rivers, creeks, swamps, or pools outside Lake Victoria?
              are there any fish that eat mosquitos or their larvae that are native to the different parts of the Lake?
              what are some of the other, non-malaria problems we face?
              for instance, are people spending lots of time gathering wood, making charcoal, or other tasks related to cooking food and boiling water? could we set up a business making solar cookers to reduce that effort?
              how might we solve some of them?
              the idea here is to think in terms of how things fit together into patterns or systems, and to find solutions to problems that fit the patterns and help in many ways. Those solutions may be obvious if you look, or they may come from the elders, or from the ancestors, or if they are still missing, from people around the world who are looking at how to live in harmony with nature and glad to share what they find.

              Here is a major training resource for community planning. What I discuss above are some of the questions you can follow in a community planning effort, to direct it efficiently. Also, look at www.col.org, and explore their resources for education and sustainability. They have a web bibliography with a million links devoted mostly to these topics, and they now have it indexed with Google.
              1. The National Charrette Institute

                The National Charrette Institute (NCI) is an IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational institution. We teach the transformative process of Dynamic Planning to ...
                www.charretteinstitute.org/ - 14k -Cached - Similar pages -
                More results from charretteinstitute.org »
              2. The NCI Charrette System

                The NCI charrette is a collaborative planning process that harnesses the talents and energies of all interested parties to create and support a feasible ...
                www.charretteinstitute.org/charrette.html - 23k -Cached - Similar pages -

              NCI Charrette System

              The NCI Charrette System (formerly called NCI Dynamic Planning) is a design-based, accelerated, collaborative project management system for all aspects of community planning including sustainable community plans, regional/comprehensive plans, transportation/infrastructure plans, and development plans. It is a proven, flexible, three-step framework that can be customized for your project.

              Benefits of the NCI Charrette System

              Compared to conventional planning processes that take years of endless meetings, the NCI Charrette System:

              Saves time and money through
              Time-compressed design sessions
              Reduced rework through short design feedback loops
              Broad support from citizens, professionals, and staff

              Increases probability for implementation through
              Multi-disciplinary teamwork
              Early focus on engineering and finance
              Bringing all decision makers together for a compressed period of time

              Promotes trust between citizens and government through
              Meaningful public involvement and education

              Applications of the NCI Charrette System

              The NCI Charrette System is a flexible, three-phase, project management system for public and private planners, designers, architects, developers and community activist to use for:
              Sustainable community and building design
              Regional and comprehensive planning
              Master planning
              Transportation/infrastructure planning
              Code/policy writing

              and I would add, designing a sustainable economy that is prosperous without waste or greed.

              Tools and Resources

              Links to Relevant Sites:
              links to related charrette, planning, public involvement and various sustainable growth resources


              NCI Resources Free for Download:

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              NCI Charrette Request for Proposals (RFP)
              NCI has developed the first model Request for Proposals (RFP), a general guide for the procurement of services relating to a community planning project that includes a NCI charrette.

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              by Bill Lennertz and Aarin Lutzenhiser for the Planning Commissioner's Journal
              Also, see the PCJ charrette resources page

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              by Bill Lennertz for the New Urban News

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              This article by Ilana Preuss of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency describes the US EPA Smart Groth Implementation Assistance Program.

              Scripted PowerPoint Presentation for Download from The National Association of REALTORS®
              This PowerPoint presentation, which includes both slides and a script, describes what a charrette is and how it can be used to improve the planning process in your community. It was produced for the National Association of REALTORS® by the National Charrette Institute, and can be used for self-instruction, or as a presentation to others.

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              An introduction to NCI Dynamic Planning and charrettes.
              Download Summer 2003 — Volume 4 Issue 1

              NCI Cross-disciplinary Public Involvement Report
              Sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, this is the final report on the NCI cross-disciplinary forum on public involvement best practices. It includes a literature review, expert papers presented at the forum, forum findings on key challenges and solutions, and project process examples.

              NCI Educational Products for Sale:

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              Also, consider joining forces with oneVillage Foundation to work with the Open Digital Village and oneVillage Initiative concepts; you can contact Joy@..., and Kafui@.... That can empower the community organizing process.

              Mark Roest



              On Thu, Dec 11, 2008 at 6:08 AM, Kennedy Owino <nafsiafricaacro@...> wrote:

              Dear all,

              I am happy about the discussion gaining momentum here and hope that our thoughts will provide certain solutions.
              Thanks Tom, Dennis and Dan for your views.
              Ricardo, you asked what type of pepper my Grand Ma used.
              It was a Red pepper (not round but finger shaped)- i cant find appropriate word to describe it.

              Peter Burgess says,
               "There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions
              > that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one
              > of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent
              > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best
              > answer"
              Peter further asks what Malaria used to be like before the advent of bed nets in Kenya and how it is now.
              Another question may be, Why is there still wide spread cases of malaria in Kenya, particularly around the Lake Victoria region yet there has been massive campaigns and mosquito nets distribution?

              My attention was drawn to a particular publication in one of today's dailies touching on the topic of Malaria.
              It said that , a study conducted by Maseno University, Nagasaki University of Japan, and I.C.P.E also published in Malaria Journal (http://www.malariajournal.com/) revealed sad findings in Nyanza Province of Kenya (around lake Victoria) that hampers the fight against malaria.
              There is wide spread misuse of bed nets, Bed nets intended for bedrooms end up on the fishing beaches.
              Poor fisher men who can not afford fishing nets use new distributed bed nets to fish and also they have opted to dry small fish (omena) on the nets.
              The emerging trend is mostly happening in Luanda Beaches of Sondo District.
              This is raising concerns among the public Health experts and the Fisheries Department.
              The habbit reverses the gains already made in fighting against malaria, the misuse also poses a risk to the fish stocks.
              The District has received a sabstantial number of nets from the Goverment and N.G.O's.
              This year alone over 20,000 pieces were distributed.
              More stastistics can be found  at http://www.malariajournal.com/

              The big question here is, Do you think Poverty and Ignorance also hampers efforts to contain Malaria?
              How can we reverse the trends where Bed nets end up being misused?

              All the best in our positive quests,

              Ken Owino
              Nafsi Africa Acrobats
              www.nafsiafrica.org
              +254723568251



              --- On Thu, 12/11/08, graham <DIYSolar@...> wrote:
              From: graham <DIYSolar@...>
              Subject: [mendenyo] Re: Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and research!
              To: mendenyo@yahoogroups.com, holistichelping@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Thursday, December 11, 2008, 2:57 AM

              Dear Andrius and others,
               
              I have already started making arrangements to test solar-powered fans with Peter.
              I imagine it would be best to have someone on the spot to do any co-ordination, etc
              with other experiments.
               
              It might be useful to test pepper but from what I have read it is
              extremely difficult to research malaria as there are so many many factors to be
              considered!
               
              Graham

               

              Peter Burgess, Graham Knight,

              Would one or both of you be willing to partner with Peter Ongele on a
              malaria related $100 project which I might sponsor (perhaps reviewing the
              data they have collected, or trying out peppers as an insecticide, or
              trying out solar powered fans?)

              Perhaps one of our Africans might be Peter's partner? That's possible as
              well. We simply need somebody interested and willing to exchange letters
              in our groups so that we can all see the progress of Peter's explorations.

              Thank you all for your letters!

              Andrius Kulikauskas
              Minciu Sodas
              http://www.ms. lt
              ms@...

              > Dear All,
              >
              > I know next to nothing about malaria but I did a short investigation some
              > years
              > ago as I had read that bed nets are often ineffective.
              > Not because mosquitoes get through the netting but because the 'climate'
              > under
              > a net can be so appalling that many, especially children, rather remove
              > the net and
              > risk the consequences.
              > A recent googling shows this is still widely reported.
              >
              > In consequence I tried to find people interested in using pv solar-powered
              > fans
              > but only now have I found someone, Peter Ongele, who is interested in
              > testing
              > this possibility!
              >
              > Graham
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Dear Colleagues
              >
              > I am delighted that this malaria conversation is moving ahead.
              >
              > There is a huge body of knowledge about malaria ... and most people
              > are only accessing a very small bit of it. One of the challenges is to
              > *manage* this vast knowledge resource and do things that work.
              >
              > I see the goal as being to reduce the burden of malaria in the area as
              > fast as possible and at as low cost as possible. In order to manage
              > this there is a need to figure out what works and what does not.
              >
              > As I understand it, insecticide treated bednets have been distributed
              > in the area ... but malaria persists. Why is this? Is this a fact, or
              > part of a fact? There are some questions that need to get answered:
              > .... how many bednets were distributed and when?
              > .... how many in the area population? How many bednets per person ...
              > per household?
              > .... what was the malaria like before bednets? What is it like after
              > bednets?
              > .... are bednets being used?
              >
              > If there is a health clinic (or clinics) in the area ... what are the
              > month by month cases of malaria? Is the number going up or down? What
              > about seasonality? What about rainfall and temperature and humidity?
              >
              > Under 5 child mortality and pregnant women (PW) are vulnerable to
              > malaria mortality. Any changes over time for under 5 and PW mortality.
              >
              > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria parasites in the
              > human population? Is this being measured at the clinic or clinics?
              > What methods are being used.
              >
              > Is there any source control of the mosquitoes? What is being done?
              >
              > Is there any change in mosquito population? Are there any mosquito
              > traps? How many? Where are they? What results? Is there daily data ...
              > or weekly? How does this look month by month?
              >
              > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria in the mosquito
              > population? Who is measuring this?
              >
              > Is interior residual spraying (IRS) being used? What chemical is being
              > used? What spray rates? When is it being done?
              >
              > There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions
              > that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one
              > of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent
              > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best
              > answer.
              >
              > But before that will happen, there is one last set of data. How much
              > do things cost? How can everything that needs to be done be done in
              > the least cost manner (this is cost efficiency). At the same time,
              > least cost is not the ultimate goal ... most cost effective is the
              > goal ... what activities give the biggest reduction in the burden of
              > malaria?
              >
              > This is a multi-variate problem ... not easy to get a perfect answer
              > ... but quite easy to get something a lot better than what has
              > prevailed in the past.
              >
              > Hope this is helpful ... I realize that I should have been more
              > helpful over the past weeks and months ... but I am trying to pull
              > together a response to the WHO Global Malaria Action Plan (WHO-GMAP)
              > using what we refer to as Integrated Malaria Management Best Practice
              > (IMM-BP). My hope is this will help to move the focus of malaria
              > control activities from Washington and Geneva to the African Community
              > and the local professionals who are most engaged and concerned about
              > progress ... and at the same time be a good basis for ongoing
              > financial support for malaria control even though the capital markets
              > have imploded.
              >
              > Sincerely
              >
              > Peter Burgess
              >
              > On Wed, Dec 10, 2008 at 12:26 AM, Kennedy Owino
              > <nafsiafricaacro@ yahoo.com> wrote:
              > > Hello Sam and all,
              > >
              > > I admire Great thoughts circulating here on how we can help in
              > combating the
              > > greatest world killer which is affecting Kenya big time.
              > > Sam, a thought just crossed my mind, pepper was being used
              > traditionally to
              > > kill insects like coackroaches and also mosquitos.
              > > Grandmothers used to drop some berries or fruits of pepper into the
              > open
              > > fire in the traditional three stone cooking stove and in a shortwhile
              > all
              > > disturbing "dudus" (mosquitoes and coakroaches would be dead).
              > > A cultural focuss or an approach can be taken on researching on if
              > some form
              > > of insecticide can be developed out of this.
              > > Better still people in the villages would use this cultural/outdated
              > method
              > > besides the use of Bed nets to control mosquitoes.
              > > I doubt if using pepper should have any negative impact on the
              > environment.
              > >
              > > Sam, i respect that you put your time and experience into finding ways
              > of
              > > dealing with the spread of malaria.
              > > Malaria should be a big concern, last week i had to donate blood to an
              > > American (a friend of a friend) who was dying in Nairobi Hospital
              > because of
              > > Celebral Malarial infection he got while on vaccation in Tanzania.
              > > He was quickly evacuated to Nairobi, he was on support unit and
              > urgently
              > > required blood platellets (if that is the right spelling).
              > > At first he was wrongly diagnosed to be suuffering from typhoid, it
              > was
              > > serious , his parents flew in from the States and evenually he had to
              > be
              > > flown out to seek proper treatment in America.
              > > Anyway, this shows how serious this may be not only to people living
              > in
              > > Africa but also to visitors and tourists as well.
              > >
              > > I laud and support your point- Ending malaria as a volume of thinking
              > and
              > > research- but most of the solutions lies with us, just a little bit of
              > > thinking.
              > >
              > > Have a thoughtful day!
              > >
              > > Ken Owino
              > > NAfsi Africa Acrobats
              > > www.nafsiafrica. org
              > > +254723568251
              > >
              > >
              > > --- On Mon, 12/8/08, Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com> wrote:
              > >
              > > From: Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com>
              > > Subject: [mendenyo] Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and
              > research!
              > > To: Mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com
              > > Date: Monday, December 8, 2008, 6:41 PM
              > >
              > > Hello Chris, Peter, Graham and all,
              > >
              > > I am crossinly happy with your all thoughtful messages
              > > and links. I trust our valuable time and commitment
              > > will give us wonderful answers/results.
              > >
              > > I carried out personal talks with the public health
              > > department in our district, on how combined efforts
              > > can help end malaria. With the Rusinga island malaria
              > > project, data, mosquito nets will help reduce malaria
              > > but most of it are studies which only help scientists
              > > and educationist not the low class villagers.
              > > With my own a wareness on malaria cases. There are two
              > > districts which benefited to a substancial change in
              > > fighting and ending malaria. The chemical used in
              > > Rachuonyo and Kisii districts will be introduced in
              > > other areas. This is a government effort.
              > > We are organizing a consortium in Kisumu on July 1-3rd
              > > 2009 to bring a real local combined a wareness on
              > > matters of sustainabillity. Once the budget is
              > > finalised we will send invitations to attendees.
              > > We need your contributions which can be sent to me or
              > > Tom Ochuka, as we are planning.
              > > Cheers to all!
              > > Samwel.
              > >
              > > http://www.surveymo nkey.com/ s.aspx?sm= 5VvLrzLaXHc0i_ 2bh5XdOTxA_
              > 3d_3d
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
              >
              >
              >
              > No virus found in this incoming message.
              > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com
              > Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.16/1842 - Release Date:
              > 12/10/2008 6:53 PM
              >

              --
              Minciu Sodas
              http://www.ms. lt
              ms@...
              +1 312 618 3345



              No virus found in this incoming message.
              Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com
              Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.16/1842 - Release Date: 12/10/2008 6:53 PM


            • charles kilel
              Yes I am interested. malaria is a major killer in Africa and anything that can be done to allevite suffuring would be most welcome. Please let me know what you
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 14, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Yes I am interested. malaria is a major killer in Africa and anything that can be done to allevite suffuring would be most welcome. Please let me know what you need me to do to help.
                 
                Thanks
                Charles Kilel
                Kercho, Kenya.
                +254272281419 

                Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:
                Peter Burgess, Graham Knight,

                Would one or both of you be willing to partner with Peter Ongele on a
                malaria related $100 project which I might sponsor (perhaps reviewing the
                data they have collected, or trying out peppers as an insecticide, or
                trying out solar powered fans?)

                Perhaps one of our Africans might be Peter's partner? That's possible as
                well. We simply need somebody interested and willing to exchange letters
                in our groups so that we can all see the progress of Peter's explorations.

                Thank you all for your letters!

                Andrius Kulikauskas
                Minciu Sodas
                http://www.ms. lt
                ms@...

                > Dear All,
                >
                > I know next to nothing about malaria but I did a short investigation some
                > years
                > ago as I had read that bed nets are often ineffective.
                > Not because mosquitoes get through the netting but because the 'climate'
                > under
                > a net can be so appalling that many, especially children, rather remove
                > the net and
                > risk the consequences.
                > A recent googling shows this is still widely reported.
                >
                > In consequence I tried to find people interested in using pv solar-powered
                > fans
                > but only now have I found someone, Peter Ongele, who is interested in
                > testing
                > this possibility!
                >
                > Graham
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Dear Colleagues
                >
                > I am delighted that this malaria conversation is moving ahead.
                >
                > There is a huge body of knowledge about malaria ... and most people
                > are only accessing a very small bit of it. One of the challenges is to
                > *manage* this vast knowledge resource and do things that work.
                >
                > I see the goal as being to reduce the burden of malaria in the area as
                > fast as possible and at as low cost as possible. In order to manage
                > this there is a need to figure out what works and what does not.
                >
                > As I understand it, insecticide treated bednets have been distributed
                > in the area ... but malaria persists. Why is this? Is this a fact, or
                > part of a fact? There are some questions that need to get answered:
                > .... how many bednets were distributed and when?
                > .... how many in the area population? How many bednets per person ...
                > per household?
                > .... what was the malaria like before bednets? What is it like after
                > bednets?
                > .... are bednets being used?
                >
                > If there is a health clinic (or clinics) in the area ... what are the
                > month by month cases of malaria? Is the number going up or down? What
                > about seasonality? What about rainfall and temperature and humidity?
                >
                > Under 5 child mortality and pregnant women (PW) are vulnerable to
                > malaria mortality. Any changes over time for under 5 and PW mortality.
                >
                > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria parasites in the
                > human population? Is this being measured at the clinic or clinics?
                > What methods are being used.
                >
                > Is there any source control of the mosquitoes? What is being done?
                >
                > Is there any change in mosquito population? Are there any mosquito
                > traps? How many? Where are they? What results? Is there daily data ...
                > or weekly? How does this look month by month?
                >
                > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria in the mosquito
                > population? Who is measuring this?
                >
                > Is interior residual spraying (IRS) being used? What chemical is being
                > used? What spray rates? When is it being done?
                >
                > There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions
                > that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one
                > of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent
                > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best
                > answer.
                >
                > But before that will happen, there is one last set of data. How much
                > do things cost? How can everything that needs to be done be done in
                > the least cost manner (this is cost efficiency). At the same time,
                > least cost is not the ultimate goal ... most cost effective is the
                > goal ... what activities give the biggest reduction in the burden of
                > malaria?
                >
                > This is a multi-variate problem ... not easy to get a perfect answer
                > ... but quite easy to get something a lot better than what has
                > prevailed in the past.
                >
                > Hope this is helpful ... I realize that I should have been more
                > helpful over the past weeks and months ... but I am trying to pull
                > together a response to the WHO Global Malaria Action Plan (WHO-GMAP)
                > using what we refer to as Integrated Malaria Management Best Practice
                > (IMM-BP). My hope is this will help to move the focus of malaria
                > control activities from Washington and Geneva to the African Community
                > and the local professionals who are most engaged and concerned about
                > progress ... and at the same time be a good basis for ongoing
                > financial support for malaria control even though the capital markets
                > have imploded.
                >
                > Sincerely
                >
                > Peter Burgess
                >
                > On Wed, Dec 10, 2008 at 12:26 AM, Kennedy Owino
                > <nafsiafricaacro@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                > > Hello Sam and all,
                > >
                > > I admire Great thoughts circulating here on how we can help in
                > combating the
                > > greatest world killer which is affecting Kenya big time.
                > > Sam, a thought just crossed my mind, pepper was being used
                > traditionally to
                > > kill insects like coackroaches and also mosquitos.
                > > Grandmothers used to drop some berries or fruits of pepper into the
                > open
                > > fire in the traditional three stone cooking stove and in a shortwhile
                > all
                > > disturbing "dudus" (mosquitoes and coakroaches would be dead).
                > > A cultural focuss or an approach can be taken on researching on if
                > some form
                > > of insecticide can be developed out of this.
                > > Better still people in the villages would use this cultural/outdated
                > method
                > > besides the use of Bed nets to control mosquitoes.
                > > I doubt if using pepper should have any negative impact on the
                > environment.
                > >
                > > Sam, i respect that you put your time and experience into finding ways
                > of
                > > dealing with the spread of malaria.
                > > Malaria should be a big concern, last week i had to donate blood to an
                > > American (a friend of a friend) who was dying in Nairobi Hospital
                > because of
                > > Celebral Malarial infection he got while on vaccation in Tanzania.
                > > He was quickly evacuated to Nairobi, he was on support unit and
                > urgently
                > > required blood platellets (if that is the right spelling).
                > > At first he was wrongly diagnosed to be suuffering from typhoid, it
                > was
                > > serious , his parents flew in from the States and evenually he had to
                > be
                > > flown out to seek proper treatment in America.
                > > Anyway, this shows how serious this may be not only to people living
                > in
                > > Africa but also to visitors and tourists as well.
                > >
                > > I laud and support your point- Ending malaria as a volume of thinking
                > and
                > > research- but most of the solutions lies with us, just a little bit of
                > > thinking.
                > >
                > > Have a thoughtful day!
                > >
                > > Ken Owino
                > > NAfsi Africa Acrobats
                > > www.nafsiafrica. org
                > > +254723568251
                > >
                > >
                > > --- On Mon, 12/8/08, Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com> wrote:
                > >
                > > From: Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com>
                > > Subject: [mendenyo] Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and
                > research!
                > > To: Mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com
                > > Date: Monday, December 8, 2008, 6:41 PM
                > >
                > > Hello Chris, Peter, Graham and all,
                > >
                > > I am crossinly happy with your all thoughtful messages
                > > and links. I trust our valuable time and commitment
                > > will give us wonderful answers/results.
                > >
                > > I carried out personal talks with the public health
                > > department in our district, on how combined efforts
                > > can help end malaria. With the Rusinga island malaria
                > > project, data, mosquito nets will help reduce malaria
                > > but most of it are studies which only help scientists
                > > and educationist not the low class villagers.
                > > With my own a wareness on malaria cases. There are two
                > > districts which benefited to a substancial change in
                > > fighting and ending malaria. The chemical used in
                > > Rachuonyo and Kisii districts will be introduced in
                > > other areas. This is a government effort.
                > > We are organizing a consortium in Kisumu on July 1-3rd
                > > 2009 to bring a real local combined a wareness on
                > > matters of sustainabillity. Once the budget is
                > > finalised we will send invitations to attendees.
                > > We need your contributions which can be sent to me or
                > > Tom Ochuka, as we are planning.
                > > Cheers to all!
                > > Samwel.
                > >
                > > http://www.surveymo nkey.com/ s.aspx?sm= 5VvLrzLaXHc0i_ 2bh5XdOTxA_
                > 3d_3d
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
                >
                >
                >
                > No virus found in this incoming message.
                > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com
                > Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.16/1842 - Release Date:
                > 12/10/2008 6:53 PM
                >

                --
                Minciu Sodas
                http://www.ms. lt
                ms@...
                +1 312 618 3345


              • graham
                Dear All, I have now prepared a preliminary document which includes the following. Sleeping under a bed net is nearly impossible during torrid African
                Message 7 of 9 , Dec 15, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dear All,
                   
                  I have now prepared a preliminary document which includes the following. 
                  " Sleeping under a bed net is nearly impossible during torrid
                  African nights, says Nigerian journalist Omololu Falobi. Use the net anyway,
                  and you get heat rashes all over your face and body."
                   
                  The cost of producing a very tiny ventilation breeze is just a few dollars but
                  whether much more would really be necessary is unknown.
                   
                  We have found that some people are unable to download pdf documents, 
                  whether due to cost or bad connections, but it is essential to be able to send
                  you diagrams as well as text.
                  This program can be downloaded from http://get.adobe.com/uk/reader/
                   
                  Those who wish to download the first document should email me at
                   
                  Graham
                   

                  Yes I am interested. malaria is a major killer in Africa and anything that can be done to allevite suffuring would be most welcome. Please let me know what you need me to do to help.
                   
                  Thanks
                  Charles Kilel
                  Kercho, Kenya.
                  +254272281419 

                  Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:
                  Peter Burgess, Graham Knight,

                  Would one or both of you be willing to partner with Peter Ongele on a
                  malaria related $100 project which I might sponsor (perhaps reviewing the
                  data they have collected, or trying out peppers as an insecticide, or
                  trying out solar powered fans?)

                  Perhaps one of our Africans might be Peter's partner? That's possible as
                  well. We simply need somebody interested and willing to exchange letters
                  in our groups so that we can all see the progress of Peter's explorations.

                  Thank you all for your letters!

                  Andrius Kulikauskas
                  Minciu Sodas
                  http://www.ms. lt
                  ms@...

                  > Dear All,
                  >
                  > I know next to nothing about malaria but I did a short investigation some
                  > years
                  > ago as I had read that bed nets are often ineffective.
                  > Not because mosquitoes get through the netting but because the 'climate'
                  > under
                  > a net can be so appalling that many, especially children, rather remove
                  > the net and
                  > risk the consequences.
                  > A recent googling shows this is still widely reported.
                  >
                  > In consequence I tried to find people interested in using pv solar-powered
                  > fans
                  > but only now have I found someone, Peter Ongele, who is interested in
                  > testing
                  > this possibility!
                  >
                  > Graham
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Dear Colleagues
                  >
                  > I am delighted that this malaria conversation is moving ahead.
                  >
                  > There is a huge body of knowledge about malaria ... and most people
                  > are only accessing a very small bit of it. One of the challenges is to
                  > *manage* this vast knowledge resource and do things that work.
                  >
                  > I see the goal as being to reduce the burden of malaria in the area as
                  > fast as possible and at as low cost as possible. In order to manage
                  > this there is a need to figure out what works and what does not.
                  >
                  > As I understand it, insecticide treated bednets have been distributed
                  > in the area ... but malaria persists. Why is this? Is this a fact, or
                  > part of a fact? There are some questions that need to get answered:
                  > .... how many bednets were distributed and when?
                  > .... how many in the area population? How many bednets per person ...
                  > per household?
                  > .... what was the malaria like before bednets? What is it like after
                  > bednets?
                  > .... are bednets being used?
                  >
                  > If there is a health clinic (or clinics) in the area ... what are the
                  > month by month cases of malaria? Is the number going up or down? What
                  > about seasonality? What about rainfall and temperature and humidity?
                  >
                  > Under 5 child mortality and pregnant women (PW) are vulnerable to
                  > malaria mortality. Any changes over time for under 5 and PW mortality.
                  >
                  > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria parasites in the
                  > human population? Is this being measured at the clinic or clinics?
                  > What methods are being used.
                  >
                  > Is there any source control of the mosquitoes? What is being done?
                  >
                  > Is there any change in mosquito population? Are there any mosquito
                  > traps? How many? Where are they? What results? Is there daily data ...
                  > or weekly? How does this look month by month?
                  >
                  > Is there any change in the prevalence of malaria in the mosquito
                  > population? Who is measuring this?
                  >
                  > Is interior residual spraying (IRS) being used? What chemical is being
                  > used? What spray rates? When is it being done?
                  >
                  > There are many questions ... essentially a lot of little questions
                  > that give data ... and the data will give answers. My hope is that one
                  > of these days we will start to be collecting the dots in a coherent
                  > way so that it becomes easy to connect the dots and get the right best
                  > answer.
                  >
                  > But before that will happen, there is one last set of data. How much
                  > do things cost? How can everything that needs to be done be done in
                  > the least cost manner (this is cost efficiency). At the same time,
                  > least cost is not the ultimate goal ... most cost effective is the
                  > goal ... what activities give the biggest reduction in the burden of
                  > malaria?
                  >
                  > This is a multi-variate problem ... not easy to get a perfect answer
                  > ... but quite easy to get something a lot better than what has
                  > prevailed in the past.
                  >
                  > Hope this is helpful ... I realize that I should have been more
                  > helpful over the past weeks and months ... but I am trying to pull
                  > together a response to the WHO Global Malaria Action Plan (WHO-GMAP)
                  > using what we refer to as Integrated Malaria Management Best Practice
                  > (IMM-BP). My hope is this will help to move the focus of malaria
                  > control activities from Washington and Geneva to the African Community
                  > and the local professionals who are most engaged and concerned about
                  > progress ... and at the same time be a good basis for ongoing
                  > financial support for malaria control even though the capital markets
                  > have imploded.
                  >
                  > Sincerely
                  >
                  > Peter Burgess
                  >
                  > On Wed, Dec 10, 2008 at 12:26 AM, Kennedy Owino
                  > <nafsiafricaacro@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                  > > Hello Sam and all,
                  > >
                  > > I admire Great thoughts circulating here on how we can help in
                  > combating the
                  > > greatest world killer which is affecting Kenya big time.
                  > > Sam, a thought just crossed my mind, pepper was being used
                  > traditionally to
                  > > kill insects like coackroaches and also mosquitos.
                  > > Grandmothers used to drop some berries or fruits of pepper into the
                  > open
                  > > fire in the traditional three stone cooking stove and in a shortwhile
                  > all
                  > > disturbing "dudus" (mosquitoes and coakroaches would be dead).
                  > > A cultural focuss or an approach can be taken on researching on if
                  > some form
                  > > of insecticide can be developed out of this.
                  > > Better still people in the villages would use this cultural/outdated
                  > method
                  > > besides the use of Bed nets to control mosquitoes.
                  > > I doubt if using pepper should have any negative impact on the
                  > environment.
                  > >
                  > > Sam, i respect that you put your time and experience into finding ways
                  > of
                  > > dealing with the spread of malaria.
                  > > Malaria should be a big concern, last week i had to donate blood to an
                  > > American (a friend of a friend) who was dying in Nairobi Hospital
                  > because of
                  > > Celebral Malarial infection he got while on vaccation in Tanzania.
                  > > He was quickly evacuated to Nairobi, he was on support unit and
                  > urgently
                  > > required blood platellets (if that is the right spelling).
                  > > At first he was wrongly diagnosed to be suuffering from typhoid, it
                  > was
                  > > serious , his parents flew in from the States and evenually he had to
                  > be
                  > > flown out to seek proper treatment in America.
                  > > Anyway, this shows how serious this may be not only to people living
                  > in
                  > > Africa but also to visitors and tourists as well.
                  > >
                  > > I laud and support your point- Ending malaria as a volume of thinking
                  > and
                  > > research- but most of the solutions lies with us, just a little bit of
                  > > thinking.
                  > >
                  > > Have a thoughtful day!
                  > >
                  > > Ken Owino
                  > > NAfsi Africa Acrobats
                  > > www.nafsiafrica. org
                  > > +254723568251
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- On Mon, 12/8/08, Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > From: Samwel Kongere <jambita1@yahoo. com>
                  > > Subject: [mendenyo] Ending malaria as a volume of thinking and
                  > research!
                  > > To: Mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com
                  > > Date: Monday, December 8, 2008, 6:41 PM
                  > >
                  > > Hello Chris, Peter, Graham and all,
                  > >
                  > > I am crossinly happy with your all thoughtful messages
                  > > and links. I trust our valuable time and commitment
                  > > will give us wonderful answers/results.
                  > >
                  > > I carried out personal talks with the public health
                  > > department in our district, on how combined efforts
                  > > can help end malaria. With the Rusinga island malaria
                  > > project, data, mosquito nets will help reduce malaria
                  > > but most of it are studies which only help scientists
                  > > and educationist not the low class villagers.
                  > > With my own a wareness on malaria cases. There are two
                  > > districts which benefited to a substancial change in
                  > > fighting and ending malaria. The chemical used in
                  > > Rachuonyo and Kisii districts will be introduced in
                  > > other areas. This is a government effort.
                  > > We are organizing a consortium in Kisumu on July 1-3rd
                  > > 2009 to bring a real local combined a wareness on
                  > > matters of sustainabillity. Once the budget is
                  > > finalised we will send invitations to attendees.
                  > > We need your contributions which can be sent to me or
                  > > Tom Ochuka, as we are planning.
                  > > Cheers to all!
                  > > Samwel.
                  > >
                  > > http://www.surveymo nkey.com/ s.aspx?sm= 5VvLrzLaXHc0i_ 2bh5XdOTxA_
                  > 3d_3d
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > No virus found in this incoming message.
                  > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg. com
                  > Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.16/1842 - Release Date:
                  > 12/10/2008 6:53 PM
                  >

                  --
                  Minciu Sodas
                  http://www.ms. lt
                  ms@...
                  +1 312 618 3345




                  No virus found in this incoming message.
                  Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
                  Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.18/1848 - Release Date: 12/14/2008 12:28 PM
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.