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Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

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  • Janet Feldman
    Dear Andrius, Steve, Wendi, Richard, and All, Thanks so much for your excellent thoughts, plans, and caring, Andrius, and to Wendi and Richard for sharing your
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 1, 2007
      Dear Andrius, Steve, Wendi, Richard, and All,

      Thanks so much for your excellent thoughts, plans, and caring, Andrius, and to Wendi and Richard for sharing your needs and insights with us. It's true that there are some similar linkages and stories you two can share, which is also true for members in Kenya, Tanzania, India, and elsewhere.

      There are a range of devices--from Internet-enabled radio recharged with solar power to solar-powered computers to cellphones--and also various programs and orgs which might be helpful to some of our members, though I know Wendi has applied for various programs and grants and so far has not been successful (the need being so great).

      That's where ideas and activities such as Andrius suggests are helpful. There are also many other innovative ways to approach meeting your needs, and hopefully we can brainstorm abt some of these.

      For example, KAIPPG (the nonprofit w/which I'm affiliated, based in Kenya) uses a combination of cellphones, radio, listening groups (ie people organized to listen to radio programs), posters and other graphics made by local artists, and cassette as well as some videotapes to convey information related to a variety of subjects, including income-generation, nutrition, and HIV/AIDS.

      Part of the funding to keep these programs going has come from grants, but more of it has been generated at the local level--via small fees charged for use of equipment, selling of produce (made easier with cellphones), and trainings for which a small fee is charged--and that has enabled both a measure of development and also greater tech-related literacy, as well as education.

      It would be great to find ways to help strengthen local capacities, in addition to helping our members go wireless or in some other way develop ICTs capabilities and Internet access.

      Richard, in Uganda you might try linking with the Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)--which also works with men!--which has long been using ICTs of various kinds. They are at www.wougnet.org, and try contacting the director, Dorothy Okello (dokello@...).

      You could also contact the Life in Africa Foundation (www.lifeinafrica.org), as they may do some work with ICTs. LiA works in Gulu. For more info:

      http://fs10.formsite.com/click4africa/form564732498/index.html (contact form for more info)
      http://lifeinafrica.com/internet/ and http://internet4change.com/uganda/

      We look forward to working together to empower, grow, learn, teach, share, dream, create, and develop each and all of our capabilities to the fullest! All best wishes and blessings, Janet

      -----Original Message-----
      >From: ouma richard <richardouma@...>
      >Sent: Aug 1, 2007 2:21 PM
      >To: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon
      >
      >HiAndrius
      >Itseems most of the African countries are having a
      >similar problems.
      >For I live in GULU Northern Uganda,but as if we sat
      >together with Wendi and wrote the challenges met in
      >communication technology.
      >--Therefor how can a person like me in Gulu acess to
      >your serviceS?ndrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:
      >
      >> Wendi and all,
      >>
      >> I share your important letter with our groups. I am
      >> writing a larger
      >> proposal that will address your situation:
      >> * A) first by allowing you to participate more fully
      >> even with marginal
      >> Internet access by enabling you to download all of
      >> our activity and
      >> upload yours
      >> * B) second by providing you with technical
      >> information on how to create
      >> your own local wireless network (allowing for links
      >> within and amongst
      >> your villages) and then steadily expanding your
      >> network until you
      >> connect with the closest Internet access points.
      >> * C) third by opening up work opportunities so that
      >> you can earn money
      >> with offline knowledge work that will pay for your
      >> efforts and also for
      >> wireless Internet access points and computers so you
      >> can keep expanding
      >> your network
      >>
      >> This will be an ongoing effort over several months
      >> and even several
      >> years. But my hope is to make progress with A)
      >> during the next few
      >> months and look for small work that you can do so
      >> that we can stay
      >> connected and work towards B) and C).
      >>
      >> Thank you for staying in touch! We are grateful to
      >> be connected with
      >> your important work! We are especially encouraged
      >> that you are linking
      >> women with ICT, as this is very important for a
      >> healthy society, both
      >> locally and globally.
      >>
      >> I have updated the page for this endeavor:
      >> http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Internet
      >> and listed it with our proposals:
      >> http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Proposals
      >>
      >> I haven't been able to find your proposal yet but
      >> please send it to our
      >> groups if you have it and lets post it at our wiki.
      >>
      >> I invite our thoughts on how we might help and work
      >> together.
      >>
      >
    • ACTWID KONGADZEM
      Dearest Andrius, Janet, Richard,Steve and all, We are very pleased with the emails you have exchanged with us and with our group members of Holistichelping
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 2, 2007
        Dearest Andrius, Janet, Richard,Steve and all,
        We are very pleased with the emails you have exchanged
        with us and with our group members of Holistichelping
        and Social Agriculture concerning our long term
        identified felt-need for a wireless internet
        connection and other communication needs. It is a
        truism that Janet and Franz Nahrada know how we have
        been struggling to write projects and fill grant
        application forms to get funding for these needs in
        vain.
        We are indeed grateful as you have informed us that
        you are writing a larger project that will serve or
        satisfy our communication needs. We all say thank you
        immensely for all these endeavours.
        We will like to let you know that what KAIPPG- Kenya
        is doing is exactly what we had identified to do here
        and we are very determined to cooperate and
        collaboration very well to achieve this goal which has
        been our wonderful miletone , searched for several
        years since the inception of the dreams.We have prayed
        over thiese needs several times and we now strongly
        feel that it will be achievable through you at
        Holistichelping and Social Agriculture groups .
        Andrius, it is a truism that we are really
        desperately in need of this wireless internet so that
        we can fully get connected to you all at our groups
        and get connected to the whole world too in order to
        improve and raise our standards of living through
        communication skills which will increase our knowledge
        and that of our entire local communities here in
        Cameroon,as we will used these communication tools to
        earn some little income too ,expand of networks here
        and other African countries by sharing skills and
        experiences in issues of proper nutrition for poor
        rural women/youths/children living with HIV/AIDS and
        those too that are interested in cultivating
        ,processing and consumption/sales of the medicinal
        herb tea for Malaria treatment ARTEMESIA, together
        with other herbs. As farmers too we are growing
        alongside a variety of fruita and vegetables as well
        as food crops that can improve Nutritionwhich we will
        like to share.
        We will train others in village groups on the use of
        computers, cellphones,radio,videos and internet on a
        small fee charged like KAIPPG and make linkages of
        these groups to others around the globe.We are appy
        now that you will,' Make it Happen'to us as we have
        been crying and thinking aloud and Janet.
        Andrius, since you have been hoping to make
        progress with 'A 'in the next few months by looking
        for ways or small work that we can do so that we stay
        connected and work toards B' and C' is really a good
        idea and we will like to be the A' sample group for
        you to start with.We are very ready to start at any
        momment that you are ready.
        All the suggestions you have made or will make are
        ideal for all of us as we hadeven made random
        selections of our own members within the groups who
        are very keen and interested in being trained
        technically with skills in creating and expanding our
        own local wireless internet and the use of other
        communication devices. So providing us too with
        information on how to create local wirelessand expand
        within us and other neighbouring villages etc is
        imperative.
        Yes, we already wrote a project which will be
        forwarded to you. Janet also had a copy. We will try
        to find a copy to send to you.
        Immense thanks for all we have shared together and we
        shall remain in touch with you all.
        Sincerely, ACTWID KONGADZEM Board members led by
        Wendi.
        --- Janet Feldman <kaippg@...> wrote:

        > Dear Andrius, Steve, Wendi, Richard, and All,
        >
        > Thanks so much for your excellent thoughts, plans,
        > and caring, Andrius, and to Wendi and Richard for
        > sharing your needs and insights with us. It's true
        > that there are some similar linkages and stories you
        > two can share, which is also true for members in
        > Kenya, Tanzania, India, and elsewhere.
        >
        > There are a range of devices--from Internet-enabled
        > radio recharged with solar power to solar-powered
        > computers to cellphones--and also various programs
        > and orgs which might be helpful to some of our
        > members, though I know Wendi has applied for various
        > programs and grants and so far has not been
        > successful (the need being so great).
        >
        > That's where ideas and activities such as Andrius
        > suggests are helpful. There are also many other
        > innovative ways to approach meeting your needs, and
        > hopefully we can brainstorm abt some of these.
        >
        > For example, KAIPPG (the nonprofit w/which I'm
        > affiliated, based in Kenya) uses a combination of
        > cellphones, radio, listening groups (ie people
        > organized to listen to radio programs), posters and
        > other graphics made by local artists, and cassette
        > as well as some videotapes to convey information
        > related to a variety of subjects, including
        > income-generation, nutrition, and HIV/AIDS.
        >
        > Part of the funding to keep these programs going has
        > come from grants, but more of it has been generated
        > at the local level--via small fees charged for use
        > of equipment, selling of produce (made easier with
        > cellphones), and trainings for which a small fee is
        > charged--and that has enabled both a measure of
        > development and also greater tech-related literacy,
        > as well as education.
        >
        > It would be great to find ways to help strengthen
        > local capacities, in addition to helping our members
        > go wireless or in some other way develop ICTs
        > capabilities and Internet access.
        >
        > Richard, in Uganda you might try linking with the
        > Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)--which also works
        > with men!--which has long been using ICTs of various
        > kinds. They are at www.wougnet.org, and try
        > contacting the director, Dorothy Okello
        > (dokello@...).
        >
        > You could also contact the Life in Africa Foundation
        > (www.lifeinafrica.org), as they may do some work
        > with ICTs. LiA works in Gulu. For more info:
        >
        >
        http://fs10.formsite.com/click4africa/form564732498/index.html
        > (contact form for more info)
        > http://lifeinafrica.com/internet/ and
        > http://internet4change.com/uganda/
        >
        > We look forward to working together to empower,
        > grow, learn, teach, share, dream, create, and
        > develop each and all of our capabilities to the
        > fullest! All best wishes and blessings, Janet
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > >From: ouma richard <richardouma@...>
        > >Sent: Aug 1, 2007 2:21 PM
        > >To: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com
        > >Subject: Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network
        > for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon
        > >
        > >HiAndrius
        > >Itseems most of the African countries are having a
        > >similar problems.
        > >For I live in GULU Northern Uganda,but as if we
        > sat
        > >together with Wendi and wrote the challenges met in
        > >communication technology.
        > >--Therefor how can a person like me in Gulu acess
        > to
        > >your serviceS?ndrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >> Wendi and all,
        > >>
        > >> I share your important letter with our groups. I
        > am
        > >> writing a larger
        > >> proposal that will address your situation:
        > >> * A) first by allowing you to participate more
        > fully
        > >> even with marginal
        > >> Internet access by enabling you to download all
        > of
        > >> our activity and
        > >> upload yours
        > >> * B) second by providing you with technical
        > >> information on how to create
        > >> your own local wireless network (allowing for
        > links
        > >> within and amongst
        > >> your villages) and then steadily expanding your
        > >> network until you
        > >> connect with the closest Internet access points.
        > >> * C) third by opening up work opportunities so
        > that
        > >> you can earn money
        > >> with offline knowledge work that will pay for
        > your
        > >> efforts and also for
        > >> wireless Internet access points and computers so
        > you
        > >> can keep expanding
        > >> your network
        > >>
        > >> This will be an ongoing effort over several
        > months
        > >> and even several
        > >> years. But my hope is to make progress with A)
        > >> during the next few
        > >> months and look for small work that you can do so
        > >> that we can stay
        > >> connected and work towards B) and C).
        > >>
        > >> Thank you for staying in touch! We are grateful
        > to
        > >> be connected with
        > >> your important work! We are especially
        > encouraged
        > >> that you are linking
        > >> women with ICT, as this is very important for a
        > >> healthy society, both
        > >> locally and globally.
        > >>
        > >> I have updated the page for this endeavor:
        > >> http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Internet
        > >> and listed it with our proposals:
        > >> http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Proposals
        > >>
        > >> I haven't been able to find your proposal yet but
        > >> please send it to our
        > >> groups if you have it and lets post it at our
        > wiki.
        > >>
        > >> I invite our thoughts on how we might help and
        > work
        > >> together.
        > >>
        > >
        >
        >




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      • subscribe@studynook.com
        Janet: I am interested in how they accomplish the radio component - since that is crucial for bandwidth and the bandwidth allowed for radio. I am also
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 2, 2007
          Janet:

          I am interested in how they accomplish the radio component - since that is crucial for bandwidth and the bandwidth allowed for radio.
           
          I am also interested in using satellites since there are many out there - if you have such examples of how they are being used please let me know.
           
          Thank You.
           
          Asif.


          From: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com [mailto:socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Janet Feldman
          Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 5:55 PM
          To: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: holistichelping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

          Dear Andrius, Steve, Wendi, Richard, and All,

          Thanks so much for your excellent thoughts, plans, and caring, Andrius, and to Wendi and Richard for sharing your needs and insights with us. It's true that there are some similar linkages and stories you two can share, which is also true for members in Kenya, Tanzania, India, and elsewhere.

          There are a range of devices--from Internet-enabled radio recharged with solar power to solar-powered computers to cellphones-- and also various programs and orgs which might be helpful to some of our members, though I know Wendi has applied for various programs and grants and so far has not been successful (the need being so great).

          That's where ideas and activities such as Andrius suggests are helpful. There are also many other innovative ways to approach meeting your needs, and hopefully we can brainstorm abt some of these.

          For example, KAIPPG (the nonprofit w/which I'm affiliated, based in Kenya) uses a combination of cellphones, radio, listening groups (ie people organized to listen to radio programs), posters and other graphics made by local artists, and cassette as well as some videotapes to convey information related to a variety of subjects, including income-generation, nutrition, and HIV/AIDS.

          Part of the funding to keep these programs going has come from grants, but more of it has been generated at the local level--via small fees charged for use of equipment, selling of produce (made easier with cellphones), and trainings for which a small fee is charged--and that has enabled both a measure of development and also greater tech-related literacy, as well as education.

          It would be great to find ways to help strengthen local capacities, in addition to helping our members go wireless or in some other way develop ICTs capabilities and Internet access.

          Richard, in Uganda you might try linking with the Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)--which also works with men!--which has long been using ICTs of various kinds. They are at www.wougnet. org, and try contacting the director, Dorothy Okello (dokello@wougnet. org).

          You could also contact the Life in Africa Foundation (www.lifeinafrica. org), as they may do some work with ICTs. LiA works in Gulu. For more info:

          http://fs10. formsite. com/click4africa /form564732498/ index.html (contact form for more info)
          http://lifeinafrica .com/internet/ and http://internet4cha nge.com/uganda/

          We look forward to working together to empower, grow, learn, teach, share, dream, create, and develop each and all of our capabilities to the fullest! All best wishes and blessings, Janet

          -----Original Message-----

          >From: ouma
          richard <richardouma@ yahoo.com>
          >Sent:
          Aug 1, 2007 2:21 PM
          >To:
          href="mailto:socialagriculture%40yahoogroups.com">socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
          >Subject:
          Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon
          >
          >HiAndrius
          >Itseems most of the African countries
          are having a
          >similar problems.
          >For I live in GULU Northern
          Uganda,but as if we sat
          >together with Wendi and wrote the challenges met
          in
          >communication technology.
          >--Therefor how can a person like me
          in Gulu acess to
          >your serviceS?ndrius Kulikauskas <
          href="mailto:ms%40ms.lt">ms@...> wrote:
          >
          >> Wendi and
          all,
          >>
          >> I share your important letter with our groups. I
          am
          >> writing a larger
          >> proposal that will address your
          situation:
          >> * A) first by allowing you to participate more
          fully
          >> even with marginal
          >> Internet access by enabling
          you to download all of
          >> our activity and
          >> upload
          yours
          >> * B) second by providing you with technical
          >>
          information on how to create
          >> your own local wireless network
          (allowing for links
          >> within and amongst
          >> your villages)
          and then steadily expanding your
          >> network until you
          >>
          connect with the closest Internet access points.
          >> * C) third by
          opening up work opportunities so that
          >> you can earn money
          >> with offline knowledge work that will pay for your
          >>
          efforts and also for
          >> wireless Internet access points and computers
          so you
          >> can keep expanding
          >> your network
          >>
          >> This will be an ongoing effort over several months
          >> and
          even several
          >> years. But my hope is to make progress with
          A)
          >> during the next few
          >> months and look for small work
          that you can do so
          >> that we can stay
          >> connected and work
          towards B) and C).
          >>
          >> Thank you for staying in touch! We
          are grateful to
          >> be connected with
          >> your important work!
          We are especially encouraged
          >> that you are linking
          >> women
          with ICT, as this is very important for a
          >> healthy society, both
          >> locally and globally.
          >>
          >> I have updated the
          page for this endeavor:
          >>
          href="http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Internet">http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Internet
          >>
          and listed it with our proposals:
          >>
          href="http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Proposals">http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Proposals
          >>
          >> I haven't been able to find your proposal yet but
          >>
          please send it to our
          >> groups if you have it and lets post it at our
          wiki.
          >>
          >> I invite our thoughts on how we might help and
          work
          >> together.
          >>
          >

        • Jeff Buderer
          Asif, As you know things are moving rapidly in emerging markets in regards to wireless even in the so called Last Mile region that are quite isolated and still
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 2, 2007
            Asif,

            As you know things are moving rapidly in emerging markets in regards to wireless even in the so called Last Mile region that are quite isolated and still do not have modern infrastructure.

            I had read that 10000 jobs were created in Cameroon to create cellular call boxes that rapidly are replacing the conventional land line call boxes.

            So we are seeing a rapid take off of the ICT sector in these regions.

            OVF is now setting up a temporary broad band network in Ghana using a wireless long distance broadband connection. I think that technology will quickly develop and be more competitive with VSAT which is now out of the range of most communities in Africa.

            As part of our Grant dispersement from COL OVF Ghana is planning to have a portion of our work focus on radio is one low cost ICT tool that can reach a large audience.

            I think that ICT programs should be designed ideally so that the more conventional and accessible ICT such as radio and cellular component the more advanced telecenter and wireless development plans.

            Jeff

            From: subscribe@...
            Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 11:40 AM
            To: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon


            Janet:

            I am interested in how they accomplish the radio component - since that is crucial for bandwidth and the bandwidth allowed for radio.
             
            I am also interested in using satellites since there are many out there - if you have such examples of how they are being used please let me know.
             
            Thank You.
             
            Asif.


            From: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:socialagric ulture@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf Of Janet Feldman
            Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 5:55 PM
            To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
            Cc: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com
            Subject: Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

            Dear Andrius, Steve, Wendi, Richard, and All,

            Thanks so much for your excellent thoughts, plans, and caring, Andrius, and to Wendi and Richard for sharing your needs and insights with us. It's true that there are some similar linkages and stories you two can share, which is also true for members in Kenya, Tanzania, India, and elsewhere.

            There are a range of devices--from Internet-enabled radio recharged with solar power to solar-powered computers to cellphones-- and also various programs and orgs which might be helpful to some of our members, though I know Wendi has applied for various programs and grants and so far has not been successful (the need being so great).

            That's where ideas and activities such as Andrius suggests are helpful. There are also many other innovative ways to approach meeting your needs, and hopefully we can brainstorm abt some of these.

            For example, KAIPPG (the nonprofit w/which I'm affiliated, based in Kenya) uses a combination of cellphones, radio, listening groups (ie people organized to listen to radio programs), posters and other graphics made by local artists, and cassette as well as some videotapes to convey information related to a variety of subjects, including income-generation, nutrition, and HIV/AIDS.

            Part of the funding to keep these programs going has come from grants, but more of it has been generated at the local level--via small fees charged for use of equipment, selling of produce (made easier with cellphones), and trainings for which a small fee is charged--and that has enabled both a measure of development and also greater tech-related literacy, as well as education.

            It would be great to find ways to help strengthen local capacities, in addition to helping our members go wireless or in some other way develop ICTs capabilities and Internet access.

            Richard, in Uganda you might try linking with the Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)--which also works with men!--which has long been using ICTs of various kinds. They are at www.wougnet. org, and try contacting the director, Dorothy Okello (dokello@wougnet. org).

            You could also contact the Life in Africa Foundation (www.lifeinafrica. org), as they may do some work with ICTs. LiA works in Gulu. For more info:

            http://fs10. formsite. com/click4africa /form564732498/ index.html (contact form for more info)
            http://lifeinafrica .com/internet/ and http://internet4cha nge.com/uganda/

            We look forward to working together to empower, grow, learn, teach, share, dream, create, and develop each and all of our capabilities to the fullest! All best wishes and blessings, Janet

            -----Original Message-----

            >From: ouma
            richard <richardouma@ yahoo.com>
            >Sent:
            Aug 1, 2007 2:21 PM
            >To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
            >Subject:
            Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon
            >
            >HiAndrius
            >Itseems most of the African countries
            are having a
            >similar problems.
            >For I live in GULU Northern
            Uganda,but as if we sat
            >together with Wendi and wrote the challenges met
            in
            >communication technology.
            >--Therefor how can a person like me
            in Gulu acess to
            >your serviceS?ndrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:
            >
            >> Wendi and
            all,
            >>
            >> I share your important letter with our groups. I
            am
            >> writing a larger
            >> proposal that will address your
            situation:
            >> * A) first by allowing you to participate more
            fully
            >> even with marginal
            >> Internet access by enabling
            you to download all of
            >> our activity and
            >> upload
            yours
            >> * B) second by providing you with technical
            >>
            information on how to create
            >> your own local wireless network
            (allowing for links
            >> within and amongst
            >> your villages)
            and then steadily expanding your
            >> network until you
            >>
            connect with the closest Internet access points.
            >> * C) third by
            opening up work opportunities so that
            >> you can earn money
            >> with offline knowledge work that will pay for your
            >>
            efforts and also for
            >> wireless Internet access points and computers
            so you
            >> can keep expanding
            >> your network
            >>
            >> This will be an ongoing effort over several months
            >> and
            even several
            >> years. But my hope is to make progress with
            A)
            >> during the next few
            >> months and look for small work
            that you can do so
            >> that we can stay
            >> connected and work
            towards B) and C).
            >>
            >> Thank you for staying in touch! We
            are grateful to
            >> be connected with
            >> your important work!
            We are especially encouraged
            >> that you are linking
            >> women
            with ICT, as this is very important for a
            >> healthy society, both
            >> locally and globally.
            >>
            >> I have updated the
            page for this endeavor:
            >> http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Internet
            >>
            and listed it with our proposals:
            >> http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Proposals
            >>
            >> I haven't been able to find your proposal yet but
            >>
            please send it to our
            >> groups if you have it and lets post it at our
            wiki.
            >>
            >> I invite our thoughts on how we might help and
            work
            >> together.
            >>
            >


          • Jeff Buderer
            Asif, The only thing disappearing based on my research will be fixed line connections (land line telephones) and of course land lines will be here for a long
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 2, 2007
              Asif,

              The only thing disappearing based on my research will be fixed line connections (land line telephones) and of course land lines will be here for a long time to come. However the pattern we are seeing is that teledensity one criteria or measurement of a modern developed society (telephones per 100 people) is going up rapidly primarily due to cellular and this has been going on only over the last 5-10 years. Before that time teledensity rates were not moving very quickly in many places in Africa, whereas in the last 5-10 years Ghana has gone up from less than 1 phone per 100 to over ten per 100. This is because the cost of wireless is much cheaper to set up than land lines. The term leapfrogging is used to describe how infrastructure and development costs are rapidly being reduced as disruptive technologies further evolve.

              If you look at what I said in the email, I suggested that programs develop that complement wireless networks and telecenters with more conventional and accessible ones like radio and now cellular.

              Indeed what I see in terms of a Integrated ICT program is an understanding of the role each plays in development.

              The satellite business has to become more competitive. For years they have been getting away with charging very high rates for connectivity and this has been a primary bottleneck inhibiting effective wide scale ICT4D deployments needed to decisively bridge the Digital Divide. Now with long distance wireless we can connect the last mile for low cost and reducing the monopoly that the VSAT vendors now have in most of the Last Mile villages/rural regions.

              Jeff


              From: subscribe@...
              Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 1:15 PM
              To: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon


              Jeff:

              I really don't see radio as disappearing. It is a very powerful tool.
              Kenya has a large Satellite in the Rift Valley whereby many are being trying to be attached to.
              VSAT may be disappearing but they still linger as communications of the past.
               
              Asif.


              From: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:socialagric ulture@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf Of Jeff Buderer
              Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 3:04 PM
              To: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com; socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
              Cc: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: re: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

              Asif,

              As you know things are moving rapidly in emerging markets in regards to wireless even in the so called Last Mile region that are quite isolated and still do not have modern infrastructure.

              I had read that 10000 jobs were created in Cameroon to create cellular call boxes that rapidly are replacing the conventional land line call boxes.

              So we are seeing a rapid take off of the ICT sector in these regions.

              OVF is now setting up a temporary broad band network in Ghana using a wireless long distance broadband connection. I think that technology will quickly develop and be more competitive with VSAT which is now out of the range of most communities in Africa.

              As part of our Grant dispersement from COL OVF Ghana is planning to have a portion of our work focus on radio is one low cost ICT tool that can reach a large audience.

              I think that ICT programs should be designed ideally so that the more conventional and accessible ICT such as radio and cellular component the more advanced telecenter and wireless development plans.

              Jeff


              From: subscribe@studynook .com
              Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 11:40 AM
              To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon


              Janet:

              I am interested in how they accomplish the radio component - since that is crucial for bandwidth and the bandwidth allowed for radio.
               
              I am also interested in using satellites since there are many out there - if you have such examples of how they are being used please let me know.
               
              Thank You.
               
              Asif.


              From: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:socialagric ulture@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf Of Janet Feldman
              Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 5:55 PM
              To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
              Cc: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

              Dear Andrius, Steve, Wendi, Richard, and All,

              Thanks so much for your excellent thoughts, plans, and caring, Andrius, and to Wendi and Richard for sharing your needs and insights with us. It's true that there are some similar linkages and stories you two can share, which is also true for members in Kenya, Tanzania, India, and elsewhere.

              There are a range of devices--from Internet-enabled radio recharged with solar power to solar-powered computers to cellphones-- and also various programs and orgs which might be helpful to some of our members, though I know Wendi has applied for various programs and grants and so far has not been successful (the need being so great).

              That's where ideas and activities such as Andrius suggests are helpful. There are also many other innovative ways to approach meeting your needs, and hopefully we can brainstorm abt some of these.

              For example, KAIPPG (the nonprofit w/which I'm affiliated, based in Kenya) uses a combination of cellphones, radio, listening groups (ie people organized to listen to radio programs), posters and other graphics made by local artists, and cassette as well as some videotapes to convey information related to a variety of subjects, including income-generation, nutrition, and HIV/AIDS.

              Part of the funding to keep these programs going has come from grants, but more of it has been generated at the local level--via small fees charged for use of equipment, selling of produce (made easier with cellphones), and trainings for which a small fee is charged--and that has enabled both a measure of development and also greater tech-related literacy, as well as education.

              It would be great to find ways to help strengthen local capacities, in addition to helping our members go wireless or in some other way develop ICTs capabilities and Internet access.

              Richard, in Uganda you might try linking with the Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)--which also works with men!--which has long been using ICTs of various kinds. They are at www.wougnet. org, and try contacting the director, Dorothy Okello (dokello@wougnet. org).

              You could also contact the Life in Africa Foundation (www.lifeinafrica. org), as they may do some work with ICTs. LiA works in Gulu. For more info:

              http://fs10. formsite. com/click4africa /form564732498/ index.html (contact form for more info)
              http://lifeinafrica .com/internet/ and http://internet4cha nge.com/uganda/

              We look forward to working together to empower, grow, learn, teach, share, dream, create, and develop each and all of our capabilities to the fullest! All best wishes and blessings, Janet

              -----Original Message-----

              >From: ouma
              richard <richardouma@ yahoo.com>
              >Sent:
              Aug 1, 2007 2:21 PM
              >To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
              >Subject:
              Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon
              >
              >HiAndrius
              >Itseems most of the African countries
              are having a
              >similar problems.
              >For I live in GULU Northern
              Uganda,but as if we sat
              >together with Wendi and wrote the challenges met
              in
              >communication technology.
              >--Therefor how can a person like me
              in Gulu acess to
              >your serviceS?ndrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:
              >
              >> Wendi and
              all,
              >>
              >> I share your important letter with our groups. I
              am
              >> writing a larger
              >> proposal that will address your
              situation:
              >> * A) first by allowing you to participate more
              fully
              >> even with marginal
              >> Internet access by enabling
              you to download all of
              >> our activity and
              >> upload
              yours
              >> * B) second by providing you with technical
              >>
              information on how to create
              >> your own local wireless network
              (allowing for links
              >> within and amongst
              >> your villages)
              and then steadily expanding your
              >> network until you
              >>
              connect with the closest Internet access points.
              >> * C) third by
              opening up work opportunities so that
              >> you can earn money
              >> with offline knowledge work that will pay for your
              >>
              efforts and also for
              >> wireless Internet access points and computers
              so you
              >> can keep expanding
              >> your network
              >>
              >> This will be an ongoing effort over several months
              >> and
              even several
              >> years. But my hope is to make progress with
              A)
              >> during the next few
              >> months and look for small work
              that you can do so
              >> that we can stay
              >> connected and work
              towards B) and C).
              >>
              >> Thank you for staying in touch! We
              are grateful to
              >> be connected with
              >> your important work!
              We are especially encouraged
              >> that you are linking
              >> women
              with ICT, as this is very important for a
              >> healthy society, both
              >> locally and globally.
              >>
              >> I have updated the
              page for this endeavor:
              >> http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Internet
              >>
              and listed it with our proposals:
              >> http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Proposals
              >>
              >> I haven't been able to find your proposal yet but
              >>
              please send it to our
              >> groups if you have it and lets post it at our
              wiki.
              >>
              >> I invite our thoughts on how we might help and
              work
              >> together.
              >>
              >



            • subscribe@studynook.com
              Jeff: No complaints here - I totally agree with you. You do have your eye on the ball. Asif. _____ From: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 2, 2007
                Jeff:

                No complaints here - I totally agree with you. You do have your eye on the ball.
                 
                Asif.


                From: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com [mailto:socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeff Buderer
                Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 4:41 PM
                To: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com; socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: holistichelping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

                Asif,

                The only thing disappearing based on my research will be fixed line connections (land line telephones) and of course land lines will be here for a long time to come. However the pattern we are seeing is that teledensity one criteria or measurement of a modern developed society (telephones per 100 people) is going up rapidly primarily due to cellular and this has been going on only over the last 5-10 years. Before that time teledensity rates were not moving very quickly in many places in Africa, whereas in the last 5-10 years Ghana has gone up from less than 1 phone per 100 to over ten per 100. This is because the cost of wireless is much cheaper to set up than land lines. The term leapfrogging is used to describe how infrastructure and development costs are rapidly being reduced as disruptive technologies further evolve.

                If you look at what I said in the email, I suggested that programs develop that complement wireless networks and telecenters with more conventional and accessible ones like radio and now cellular.

                Indeed what I see in terms of a Integrated ICT program is an understanding of the role each plays in development.

                The satellite business has to become more competitive. For years they have been getting away with charging very high rates for connectivity and this has been a primary bottleneck inhibiting effective wide scale ICT4D deployments needed to decisively bridge the Digital Divide. Now with long distance wireless we can connect the last mile for low cost and reducing the monopoly that the VSAT vendors now have in most of the Last Mile villages/rural regions.

                Jeff


                From: subscribe@studynook .com
                Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 1:15 PM
                To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: RE: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon


                Jeff:

                I really don't see radio as disappearing. It is a very powerful tool.
                Kenya has a large Satellite in the Rift Valley whereby many are being trying to be attached to.
                VSAT may be disappearing but they still linger as communications of the past.
                 
                Asif.


                From: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:socialagric ulture@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf Of Jeff Buderer
                Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 3:04 PM
                To: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com; socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                Cc: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: re: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

                Asif,

                As you know things are moving rapidly in emerging markets in regards to wireless even in the so called Last Mile region that are quite isolated and still do not have modern infrastructure.

                I had read that 10000 jobs were created in Cameroon to create cellular call boxes that rapidly are replacing the conventional land line call boxes.

                So we are seeing a rapid take off of the ICT sector in these regions.

                OVF is now setting up a temporary broad band network in Ghana using a wireless long distance broadband connection. I think that technology will quickly develop and be more competitive with VSAT which is now out of the range of most communities in Africa.

                As part of our Grant dispersement from COL OVF Ghana is planning to have a portion of our work focus on radio is one low cost ICT tool that can reach a large audience.

                I think that ICT programs should be designed ideally so that the more conventional and accessible ICT such as radio and cellular component the more advanced telecenter and wireless development plans.

                Jeff


                From: subscribe@studynook .com
                Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 11:40 AM
                To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon


                Janet:

                I am interested in how they accomplish the radio component - since that is crucial for bandwidth and the bandwidth allowed for radio.
                 
                I am also interested in using satellites since there are many out there - if you have such examples of how they are being used please let me know.
                 
                Thank You.
                 
                Asif.


                From: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:socialagric ulture@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf Of Janet Feldman
                Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 5:55 PM
                To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                Cc: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

                Dear Andrius, Steve, Wendi, Richard, and All,

                Thanks so much for your excellent thoughts, plans, and caring, Andrius, and to Wendi and Richard for sharing your needs and insights with us. It's true that there are some similar linkages and stories you two can share, which is also true for members in Kenya, Tanzania, India, and elsewhere.

                There are a range of devices--from Internet-enabled radio recharged with solar power to solar-powered computers to cellphones-- and also various programs and orgs which might be helpful to some of our members, though I know Wendi has applied for various programs and grants and so far has not been successful (the need being so great).

                That's where ideas and activities such as Andrius suggests are helpful. There are also many other innovative ways to approach meeting your needs, and hopefully we can brainstorm abt some of these.

                For example, KAIPPG (the nonprofit w/which I'm affiliated, based in Kenya) uses a combination of cellphones, radio, listening groups (ie people organized to listen to radio programs), posters and other graphics made by local artists, and cassette as well as some videotapes to convey information related to a variety of subjects, including income-generation, nutrition, and HIV/AIDS.

                Part of the funding to keep these programs going has come from grants, but more of it has been generated at the local level--via small fees charged for use of equipment, selling of produce (made easier with cellphones), and trainings for which a small fee is charged--and that has enabled both a measure of development and also greater tech-related literacy, as well as education.

                It would be great to find ways to help strengthen local capacities, in addition to helping our members go wireless or in some other way develop ICTs capabilities and Internet access.

                Richard, in Uganda you might try linking with the Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)--which also works with men!--which has long been using ICTs of various kinds. They are at www.wougnet. org, and try contacting the director, Dorothy Okello (dokello@wougnet. org).

                You could also contact the Life in Africa Foundation (www.lifeinafrica. org), as they may do some work with ICTs. LiA works in Gulu. For more info:

                http://fs10. formsite. com/click4africa /form564732498/ index.html (contact form for more info)
                http://lifeinafrica .com/internet/ and http://internet4cha nge.com/uganda/

                We look forward to working together to empower, grow, learn, teach, share, dream, create, and develop each and all of our capabilities to the fullest! All best wishes and blessings, Janet

                -----Original Message-----

                >From: ouma
                richard <richardouma@ yahoo.com>
                >Sent:
                Aug 1, 2007 2:21 PM
                >To:
                href="mailto:socialagriculture%40yahoogroups.com">socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                >Subject:
                Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon
                >
                >HiAndrius
                >Itseems most of the African countries
                are having a
                >similar problems.
                >For I live in GULU Northern
                Uganda,but as if we sat
                >together with Wendi and wrote the challenges met
                in
                >communication technology.
                >--Therefor how can a person like me
                in Gulu acess to
                >your serviceS?ndrius Kulikauskas <
                href="mailto:ms%40ms.lt">ms@...> wrote:
                >
                >> Wendi and
                all,
                >>
                >> I share your important letter with our groups. I
                am
                >> writing a larger
                >> proposal that will address your
                situation:
                >> * A) first by allowing you to participate more
                fully
                >> even with marginal
                >> Internet access by enabling
                you to download all of
                >> our activity and
                >> upload
                yours
                >> * B) second by providing you with technical
                >>
                information on how to create
                >> your own local wireless network
                (allowing for links
                >> within and amongst
                >> your villages)
                and then steadily expanding your
                >> network until you
                >>
                connect with the closest Internet access points.
                >> * C) third by
                opening up work opportunities so that
                >> you can earn money
                >> with offline knowledge work that will pay for your
                >>
                efforts and also for
                >> wireless Internet access points and computers
                so you
                >> can keep expanding
                >> your network
                >>
                >> This will be an ongoing effort over several months
                >> and
                even several
                >> years. But my hope is to make progress with
                A)
                >> during the next few
                >> months and look for small work
                that you can do so
                >> that we can stay
                >> connected and work
                towards B) and C).
                >>
                >> Thank you for staying in touch! We
                are grateful to
                >> be connected with
                >> your important work!
                We are especially encouraged
                >> that you are linking
                >> women
                with ICT, as this is very important for a
                >> healthy society, both
                >> locally and globally.
                >>
                >> I have updated the
                page for this endeavor:
                >>
                href="http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Internet">http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Internet
                >>
                and listed it with our proposals:
                >>
                href="http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Proposals">http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Proposals
                >>
                >> I haven't been able to find your proposal yet but
                >>
                please send it to our
                >> groups if you have it and lets post it at our
                wiki.
                >>
                >> I invite our thoughts on how we might help and
                work
                >> together.
                >>
                >



              • samuel kongere
                Jeff And Asif, The advantage is there for cellular phones and land lines can still serve so long we are not able to get wireless boosters in some more rural
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 2, 2007
                  Jeff And Asif,
                   
                  The advantage is there for cellular phones and land lines can still serve so long we are not able to get wireless boosters in some more rural communities. Radio, satellites have served us well for long and Radio still connect to many communities in Africa compared to the access VSAT is giving in Internet connections. With the emergence of the FM stations people are lured to information through Radio than any other media. Try to survey the homes infact every house within a homestead has radio. For Internet access to be realized in Rural Kenya, there must be wireless networks to connect the rural communities.
                  Sam

                  Jeff Buderer <jeff@...> wrote:
                  Asif,

                  The only thing disappearing based on my research will be fixed line connections (land line telephones) and of course land lines will be here for a long time to come. However the pattern we are seeing is that teledensity one criteria or measurement of a modern developed society (telephones per 100 people) is going up rapidly primarily due to cellular and this has been going on only over the last 5-10 years. Before that time teledensity rates were not moving very quickly in many places in Africa, whereas in the last 5-10 years Ghana has gone up from less than 1 phone per 100 to over ten per 100. This is because the cost of wireless is much cheaper to set up than land lines. The term leapfrogging is used to describe how infrastructure and development costs are rapidly being reduced as disruptive technologies further evolve.

                  If you look at what I said in the email, I suggested that programs develop that complement wireless networks and telecenters with more conventional and accessible ones like radio and now cellular.

                  Indeed what I see in terms of a Integrated ICT program is an understanding of the role each plays in development.

                  The satellite business has to become more competitive. For years they have been getting away with charging very high rates for connectivity and this has been a primary bottleneck inhibiting effective wide scale ICT4D deployments needed to decisively bridge the Digital Divide. Now with long distance wireless we can connect the last mile for low cost and reducing the monopoly that the VSAT vendors now have in most of the Last Mile villages/rural regions.

                  Jeff


                  From: subscribe@studynook .com
                  Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 1:15 PM
                  To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: RE: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon


                  Jeff:

                  I really don't see radio as disappearing. It is a very powerful tool.
                  Kenya has a large Satellite in the Rift Valley whereby many are being trying to be attached to.
                  VSAT may be disappearing but they still linger as communications of the past.
                   
                  Asif.


                  From: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:socialagric ulture@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf Of Jeff Buderer
                  Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 3:04 PM
                  To: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com; socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                  Cc: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: re: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

                  Asif,

                  As you know things are moving rapidly in emerging markets in regards to wireless even in the so called Last Mile region that are quite isolated and still do not have modern infrastructure.

                  I had read that 10000 jobs were created in Cameroon to create cellular call boxes that rapidly are replacing the conventional land line call boxes.

                  So we are seeing a rapid take off of the ICT sector in these regions.

                  OVF is now setting up a temporary broad band network in Ghana using a wireless long distance broadband connection. I think that technology will quickly develop and be more competitive with VSAT which is now out of the range of most communities in Africa.

                  As part of our Grant dispersement from COL OVF Ghana is planning to have a portion of our work focus on radio is one low cost ICT tool that can reach a large audience.

                  I think that ICT programs should be designed ideally so that the more conventional and accessible ICT such as radio and cellular component the more advanced telecenter and wireless development plans.

                  Jeff

                  From: subscribe@studynook .com
                  Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 11:40 AM
                  To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: [holistichelping] RE: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon


                  Janet:

                  I am interested in how they accomplish the radio component - since that is crucial for bandwidth and the bandwidth allowed for radio.
                   
                  I am also interested in using satellites since there are many out there - if you have such examples of how they are being used please let me know.
                   
                  Thank You.
                   
                  Asif.


                  From: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:socialagric ulture@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf Of Janet Feldman
                  Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 5:55 PM
                  To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                  Cc: holistichelping@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon

                  Dear Andrius, Steve, Wendi, Richard, and All,

                  Thanks so much for your excellent thoughts, plans, and caring, Andrius, and to Wendi and Richard for sharing your needs and insights with us. It's true that there are some similar linkages and stories you two can share, which is also true for members in Kenya, Tanzania, India, and elsewhere.

                  There are a range of devices--from Internet-enabled radio recharged with solar power to solar-powered computers to cellphones-- and also various programs and orgs which might be helpful to some of our members, though I know Wendi has applied for various programs and grants and so far has not been successful (the need being so great).

                  That's where ideas and activities such as Andrius suggests are helpful. There are also many other innovative ways to approach meeting your needs, and hopefully we can brainstorm abt some of these.

                  For example, KAIPPG (the nonprofit w/which I'm affiliated, based in Kenya) uses a combination of cellphones, radio, listening groups (ie people organized to listen to radio programs), posters and other graphics made by local artists, and cassette as well as some videotapes to convey information related to a variety of subjects, including income-generation, nutrition, and HIV/AIDS.

                  Part of the funding to keep these programs going has come from grants, but more of it has been generated at the local level--via small fees charged for use of equipment, selling of produce (made easier with cellphones), and trainings for which a small fee is charged--and that has enabled both a measure of development and also greater tech-related literacy, as well as education.

                  It would be great to find ways to help strengthen local capacities, in addition to helping our members go wireless or in some other way develop ICTs capabilities and Internet access.

                  Richard, in Uganda you might try linking with the Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET)--which also works with men!--which has long been using ICTs of various kinds. They are at www.wougnet. org, and try contacting the director, Dorothy Okello (dokello@wougnet. org).

                  You could also contact the Life in Africa Foundation (www.lifeinafrica. org), as they may do some work with ICTs. LiA works in Gulu. For more info:

                  http://fs10. formsite. com/click4africa /form564732498/ index.html (contact form for more info)
                  http://lifeinafrica .com/internet/ and http://internet4cha nge.com/uganda/

                  We look forward to working together to empower, grow, learn, teach, share, dream, create, and develop each and all of our capabilities to the fullest! All best wishes and blessings, Janet

                  -----Original Message-----
                  >From: ouma richard <richardouma@ yahoo.com>
                  >Sent: Aug 1, 2007 2:21 PM
                  >To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com
                  >Subject: Re: [socialagriculture] Wireless network for Actwid Kongadzem in Cameroon
                  >
                  >HiAndrius
                  >Itseems most of the African countries are having a
                  >similar problems.
                  >For I live in GULU Northern Uganda,but as if we sat
                  >together with Wendi and wrote the challenges met in
                  >communication technology.
                  >--Therefor how can a person like me in Gulu acess to
                  >your serviceS?ndrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >> Wendi and all,
                  >>
                  >> I share your important letter with our groups. I am
                  >> writing a larger
                  >> proposal that will address your situation:
                  >> * A) first by allowing you to participate more fully
                  >> even with marginal
                  >> Internet access by enabling you to download all of
                  >> our activity and
                  >> upload yours
                  >> * B) second by providing you with technical
                  >> information on how to create
                  >> your own local wireless network (allowing for links
                  >> within and amongst
                  >> your villages) and then steadily expanding your
                  >> network until you
                  >> connect with the closest Internet access points.
                  >> * C) third by opening up work opportunities so that
                  >> you can earn money
                  >> with offline knowledge work that will pay for your
                  >> efforts and also for
                  >> wireless Internet access points and computers so you
                  >> can keep expanding
                  >> your network
                  >>
                  >> This will be an ongoing effort over several months
                  >> and even several
                  >> years. But my hope is to make progress with A)
                  >> during the next few
                  >> months and look for small work that you can do so
                  >> that we can stay
                  >> connected and work towards B) and C).
                  >>
                  >> Thank you for staying in touch! We are grateful to
                  >> be connected with
                  >> your important work! We are especially encouraged
                  >> that you are linking
                  >> women with ICT, as this is very important for a
                  >> healthy society, both
                  >> locally and globally.
                  >>
                  >> I have updated the page for this endeavor:
                  >> http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Internet
                  >> and listed it with our proposals:
                  >> http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Proposals
                  >>
                  >> I haven't been able to find your proposal yet but
                  >> please send it to our
                  >> groups if you have it and lets post it at our wiki.
                  >>
                  >> I invite our thoughts on how we might help and work
                  >> together.
                  >>
                  >






                  Samwel Okech kongere
                  Nyamuga primary school
                  P.O BOX 191,
                  MBITA  040305-KENYA.
                  Cell: +254 725 600 439
                  Information Networking and E-learning Trainings
                  UDOGO youth development/Miniciu-Sodas Laboratories


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