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Gary Bromley

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  • Joe Pelletier
    Hello. I m wondering what happened to Gary Bromley in the 1975-76 season. He had taken over from Roger Crozier as the number one goalie that season but only
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 3, 2000
      Hello.

      I'm wondering what happened to Gary Bromley in the 1975-76
      season. He had taken over from Roger Crozier as the number one
      goalie that season but only played 8 professional games the following
      year. I suspect he had an injury of some sort?

      By the way Bromley is now a firefighter in Vancouver

      --
      Joe Pelletier
      Hockey Over Time
      http://www.lcshockey.com/history
    • Lloyd Davis
      Dave Dryden s decision to jump to the Chicago Cougars in 1974-75 created the opening for Bromley to become the Sabres #1 goalie. It looks to have been a wise
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 11, 2002
        Dave Dryden's decision to jump to the Chicago Cougars in 1974-75 created the opening for Bromley to become the Sabres' #1 goalie.

        It looks to have been a wise move on Dryden's part. The Sabres dropped from 88 points in '73-74 to 76, and dropped from third-lowest to tenth in GA. Defence was clearly the culprit.

        The blueline corps was turned over completely: of Buffalo's six defencemen at the beginning of '73-74, only one -- Larry Carriere -- remained at the end of '74-75. In '73-74, Doug Rombough was traded to the NY Islanders for Brian Spencer, while Tracy Pratt was sent to Vancouver for Jerry Korab. Tim Horton died in February, his place essentially taken by Jim Schoenfeld. During the off-season, Paul Terbenche was allowed to sign with David Stewart-Candy's beloved Vancouver Blazers. Early in '74-75, Mike Robitaille was sent to the Canucks for Jocelyn Guevremont. Bill Hajt and Lee Fogolin became full-timers in '74-75, as did Schoenfeld.

        I would conclude, then, that Dryden couldn't have been part of the Sabres' long-term plans, either.

        In '74-75 the Sabres improved slightly from tenth to sixth in goals against, but the big change was on offence, where they exploded from 240 to 354 goals. You don't need a great goalie when you're scoring four and a half goals a game.

        But you do need a great goalie if you're going to go deep into the Stanley Cup playoffs, and a couple of things hint at Buffalo GM Punch Imlach being less than satisfied with his goaltending. First of all, Crozier's workload doubled from 12 to 23 games. (This should have led the #3 goalie, Rocky Farr, to conclude that his days were numbered as well.) Crozier went 17-2-1, so even though he was the backup, it sure looks like he was carrying the freight.

        Next, there's the acquisition of Gerry Desjardins. I don't know the story here, but I'd sure like to. We know that Desjardins jumped from the Islanders to the Michigan Stags prior to the '74-75 season. The Stags didn't make it through the year, and moved to Baltimore in mid-season. Before the season was over, Desjardins was released from his WHA contract (my guess is that Baltimore was failing to meet payroll?).

        So Desjardins is a free agent. But the Islanders own his NHL rights, and they don't need him. Chico Resch has taken his place quite nicely. The Sabres jump at this opportunity, picking up Desjardins' NHL rights in exchange for the NHL rights to Garry Lariviere, a rookie defenceman who had jumped to Phoenix of the WHA. (Lariviere would never play for the Isles. After a couple of years, he went to Quebec, who claimed him as a priority selection when they entered the NHL in 1979.)

        Desjardins played 9 regular-season games for Buffalo down the stretch, going 6-2-1. Then he played in all but two of the Sabres' playoff games. (Crozier made five appearances, while Bromley did not appear during the playoffs.)

        So before the 1974-75 season was over, Desjardins had been firmly entrenched as the #1 goalie, with Crozier and Al Smith as backups. That explains why Bromley made only one appearance for the Sabres in 1975-76 -- but why only 7 GP for Providence? Well, not only was he lost amid the Sabres' goaltending depth, as Joe suggests, but in the AHL he was fighting a losing battle for playing time against goalies from several other teams!

        In Providence, Ed Staniowski (St. Louis property) was the #1 goalie, followed by Doug Soetaert (Rangers), Bob Sauve (Sabres), Yves Belanger (Blues), Bromley, and Paul Harrison (North Stars). The Sabres also had Don Edwards playing in Hershey, alongside Pittsburgh farmhands Michel Plasse, Gord Laxton and Gary Inness <stitch>.

        No wonder, then, that Bromley signed with the WHA's Calgary Cowboys for the '76-77 season.

        David mentioned that the Sabres' goaltending situation was in a state of flux in those days. Well, this is where it really gets weird. During a game against Boston in February 1977, former Sabre Peter McNab deflected a shot that hit Desjardins in the eye, taking him out of the lineup and essentially ending his career.

        The Sabres' next game was three nights later, against Minnesota. GM Punch Imlach recalled Don Edwards from Hershey, and ordered coach Floyd Smith to play Edwards against the North Stars. No one bothered to tell the two goalies, however, and when backup goalie Al Smith found out he wasn't starting, he walked out on the team a la Patrick Roy. Not only was Edwards making his NHL debut, but he was the only goalie dressed for the game. Buffalo could've used Bromley right about then!

        Bob Sauve was recalled from the minors to take Al Smith's place. This would be the Sabres' steady goaltending tandem for the next five years. Smith resurfaced with the New England Whalers in 1977-78.

        Lloyd Davis Publishing Services
        201-488 Danforth Avenue
        Toronto, ON M4K 1P6
        416-465-6999 (tel.) /// 416-462-0326 (fax)
        loydavis@...
      • I am Joe Pelletier
        Thanks Lloyd. One question though - are we sure that Bromley was on the minor league roster for most of that entire year? That s a rediculous goaltending glut!
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 11, 2002
          Thanks Lloyd. One question though - are we sure that Bromley was on the
          minor league roster for most of that entire year? That's a rediculous
          goaltending glut!

          By the way, I saw his Skull mask he used with Vancouver for the first time
          today. That's an impressive mask for the man named Bones!


          _________________________________________________________________
          Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp.
        • Lloyd Davis
          Without going to contemporary sources, it s hard to know exactly what was going on. But what can the statistical trail tell us? Well, first of all, five
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 12, 2002
            Without going to contemporary sources, it's hard to know exactly what was
            going on. But what can the statistical trail tell us?

            Well, first of all, five goalies isn't an unusually high number for the AHL
            in 1975-76. Richmond had six different goalies appear in at least one game;
            Hershey, Providence and Springfield, 5 each; New Haven, 4; Baltimore and
            Rochester, 3 each. Nova Scotia got by with two.

            Looking at Providence, Ed Staniowski led the team with 29 appearances. He
            also played in 11 games for St. Louis in 1975-76.

            Doug Soetaert was next, with 16 GP in Rhode Island. He played 8 games for
            the Rangers.

            Yves Belanger played 10 games for the Reds, and 31 for St. Louis.

            Bromley played 7 games for the Reds, and 1 for Buffalo.

            Bob Sauve played 14 games in Providence, and 17 more in Charlotte of the
            SHL.

            Paul Harrison played 3 games for the Reds, and 6 for Minnesota.

            So, every one of the five goalies played somewhere else that year, and Sauve
            is the only one who didn't split his time between the NHL and AHL.

            Now, let's look at the parent clubs.

            St. Louis started 1975-76 with a tandem of Ed Johnston and Gilles Gratton. A
            note in Gratton's entry in TH2 tells us that Gratton walked out on the team
            after a Nov. 28 game against the Islanders. So Belanger and Staniowski seem
            to have taken turns spelling Johnston, with Belanger apparently #2 on the
            depth chart.

            In New York, the plan was to go with Ed Giacomin and John Davidson. But on
            Halloween, the Rangers shocked everyone by waiving Giacomin, who was picked
            up by Detroit. Davidson inherited the #1 job and appeared in 56 games. His
            backup was Dunc Wilson, who would play in 20 Rangers games, plus six more
            for Baltimore of the AHL. Then there was Soetaert. On the merry-go-round
            that was NHL goaltending in the 70s (or was it more a game of musical
            chairs?), Gratton would be the #2 goalie in New York in '76-77, after Wilson
            was sent to Pittsburgh. Soetaert would split time between Rangers and New
            Haven. Are we dizzy yet?

            In Minnesota, Cesare Maniago and Pete LoPresti appeared in 47 and 34 games
            respectively. Didn't leave a lot of playing time for Harrison. This one is a
            question mark for me. Harrison was 20, and just a year out of junior. So
            it's odd that he would play only three minor league games. I can only
            suspect he was being used as a practice goalie in '75-76. The Stars also had
            a Brian Holderness playing in New Haven. (In '76-77, the team did find a
            minor-league job for Harrison. He played a league-leading 55 games in New
            Haven, alongside -- get ready -- Doug Soetaert. Curiouser and curiouser.)

            So, returning to Bromley, seven games in the AHL doesn't seem all that
            unusual for a guy who's #4 on the Sabres' NHL depth chart -- and with
            Edwards and Sauve in the pipeline, you could put him sixth organizationally.
            As he'd never been more than a backup prior to 1974-75, and seems to have
            gotten that job by default, I doubt his contract was much of an issue. But
            it would be interesting to know more.


            on 2/11/02 11:28 PM, I am Joe Pelletier at iamjoepelletier@...
            wrote:

            > Thanks Lloyd. One question though - are we sure that Bromley was on the
            > minor league roster for most of that entire year? That's a rediculous
            > goaltending glut!

            --
            Lloyd Davis
            Lloyd Davis Publishing Services
            201-488 Danforth Avenue
            Toronto, ON M4K 1P6
            416 465 6999 /// 416 462 0230 (fax)
            loydavis@...
          • jeremy cornish
            can someone please send me some info on how to get off of this list please??????????? ... _________________________________________________________________
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 12, 2002
              can someone please send me some info on how to get off of this list
              please???????????

              >From: Lloyd Davis <ldavis2@...>
              >Reply-To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
              >To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [hockhist] Gary Bromley
              >Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 22:51:28 EST
              >
              >Dave Dryden's decision to jump to the Chicago Cougars in 1974-75 created
              >the opening for Bromley to become the Sabres' #1 goalie.
              >
              >It looks to have been a wise move on Dryden's part. The Sabres dropped from
              >88 points in '73-74 to 76, and dropped from third-lowest to tenth in GA.
              >Defence was clearly the culprit.
              >
              >The blueline corps was turned over completely: of Buffalo's six defencemen
              >at the beginning of '73-74, only one -- Larry Carriere -- remained at the
              >end of '74-75. In '73-74, Doug Rombough was traded to the NY Islanders for
              >Brian Spencer, while Tracy Pratt was sent to Vancouver for Jerry Korab. Tim
              >Horton died in February, his place essentially taken by Jim Schoenfeld.
              >During the off-season, Paul Terbenche was allowed to sign with David
              >Stewart-Candy's beloved Vancouver Blazers. Early in '74-75, Mike Robitaille
              >was sent to the Canucks for Jocelyn Guevremont. Bill Hajt and Lee Fogolin
              >became full-timers in '74-75, as did Schoenfeld.
              >
              >I would conclude, then, that Dryden couldn't have been part of the Sabres'
              >long-term plans, either.
              >
              >In '74-75 the Sabres improved slightly from tenth to sixth in goals
              >against, but the big change was on offence, where they exploded from 240 to
              >354 goals. You don't need a great goalie when you're scoring four and a
              >half goals a game.
              >
              >But you do need a great goalie if you're going to go deep into the Stanley
              >Cup playoffs, and a couple of things hint at Buffalo GM Punch Imlach being
              >less than satisfied with his goaltending. First of all, Crozier's workload
              >doubled from 12 to 23 games. (This should have led the #3 goalie, Rocky
              >Farr, to conclude that his days were numbered as well.) Crozier went
              >17-2-1, so even though he was the backup, it sure looks like he was
              >carrying the freight.
              >
              >Next, there's the acquisition of Gerry Desjardins. I don't know the story
              >here, but I'd sure like to. We know that Desjardins jumped from the
              >Islanders to the Michigan Stags prior to the '74-75 season. The Stags
              >didn't make it through the year, and moved to Baltimore in mid-season.
              >Before the season was over, Desjardins was released from his WHA contract
              >(my guess is that Baltimore was failing to meet payroll?).
              >
              >So Desjardins is a free agent. But the Islanders own his NHL rights, and
              >they don't need him. Chico Resch has taken his place quite nicely. The
              >Sabres jump at this opportunity, picking up Desjardins' NHL rights in
              >exchange for the NHL rights to Garry Lariviere, a rookie defenceman who had
              >jumped to Phoenix of the WHA. (Lariviere would never play for the Isles.
              >After a couple of years, he went to Quebec, who claimed him as a priority
              >selection when they entered the NHL in 1979.)
              >
              >Desjardins played 9 regular-season games for Buffalo down the stretch,
              >going 6-2-1. Then he played in all but two of the Sabres' playoff games.
              >(Crozier made five appearances, while Bromley did not appear during the
              >playoffs.)
              >
              >So before the 1974-75 season was over, Desjardins had been firmly
              >entrenched as the #1 goalie, with Crozier and Al Smith as backups. That
              >explains why Bromley made only one appearance for the Sabres in 1975-76 --
              >but why only 7 GP for Providence? Well, not only was he lost amid the
              >Sabres' goaltending depth, as Joe suggests, but in the AHL he was fighting
              >a losing battle for playing time against goalies from several other teams!
              >
              >In Providence, Ed Staniowski (St. Louis property) was the #1 goalie,
              >followed by Doug Soetaert (Rangers), Bob Sauve (Sabres), Yves Belanger
              >(Blues), Bromley, and Paul Harrison (North Stars). The Sabres also had Don
              >Edwards playing in Hershey, alongside Pittsburgh farmhands Michel Plasse,
              >Gord Laxton and Gary Inness <stitch>.
              >
              >No wonder, then, that Bromley signed with the WHA's Calgary Cowboys for the
              >'76-77 season.
              >
              >David mentioned that the Sabres' goaltending situation was in a state of
              >flux in those days. Well, this is where it really gets weird. During a game
              >against Boston in February 1977, former Sabre Peter McNab deflected a shot
              >that hit Desjardins in the eye, taking him out of the lineup and
              >essentially ending his career.
              >
              >The Sabres' next game was three nights later, against Minnesota. GM Punch
              >Imlach recalled Don Edwards from Hershey, and ordered coach Floyd Smith to
              >play Edwards against the North Stars. No one bothered to tell the two
              >goalies, however, and when backup goalie Al Smith found out he wasn't
              >starting, he walked out on the team a la Patrick Roy. Not only was Edwards
              >making his NHL debut, but he was the only goalie dressed for the game.
              >Buffalo could've used Bromley right about then!
              >
              >Bob Sauve was recalled from the minors to take Al Smith's place. This would
              >be the Sabres' steady goaltending tandem for the next five years. Smith
              >resurfaced with the New England Whalers in 1977-78.
              >
              >Lloyd Davis Publishing Services
              >201-488 Danforth Avenue
              >Toronto, ON M4K 1P6
              >416-465-6999 (tel.) /// 416-462-0326 (fax)
              >loydavis@...
              >


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            • h0ckeynut17
              ... Sure, look at the bottom of EVERY posting on the list for the unsubscribe e-mail address, send that e-mail from the address you are subscribed under. If
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 12, 2002
                > can someone please send me some info on how to get off of this list
                > please???????????

                Sure, look at the bottom of EVERY posting on the list for the
                unsubscribe e-mail address, send that e-mail from the address you are
                subscribed under. If you're a member of Yahoo! it is even easier,
                just go to groups.yahoo.com and click on My Groups.

                Of all the difficult things on the 'net... this is not one of them.

                mike
                @...
              • David Stewart-Candy
                I great piece of writing. Especially like the comments about my beloved Blazers! :-) * * * What I seem to had found interesting with Buffalo s revolving door
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 12, 2002
                  I great piece of writing. Especially like the comments
                  about my beloved Blazers! :-)

                  * * *

                  What I seem to had found interesting with Buffalo's
                  revolving door of goalies, was that both Edwards and
                  Sauve were pretty far down on the depth chart (didn't
                  one or both spend some time on Buffalo's farm's farm
                  team in Charlotte).

                  But this tandem was one of the better ones that I can
                  recall from ca. 1977-1979.

                  What happened to Don Edwards? He had a few seasons
                  there of brilliance and then disappeared off the face
                  of the earth. Was he the 1970s answer to Jim Carey?

                  As it all relates to Bromley, the fact that Buffalo
                  went with the geriatric Crozier over Bromley in the
                  playoffs doesn't look to good on Bromley.

                  I always liked him as a Canuck, albeit a short time he
                  was here. But then again, Glen Hanlon and then King
                  Richard came along.

                  D!

                  =====
                  David Stewart-Candy

                  International Ice Hockey Almanac
                  Canadian Lacrosse Almanac
                  East Vancouver, British Columbia

                  Just say "NO! to the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver

                  ______________________________________________________________________
                  Web-hosting solutions for home and business! http://website.yahoo.ca
                • David Stewart-Candy
                  If you scroll down to the bottom of the message, there s a hint! D! ... ===== David Stewart-Candy International Ice Hockey Almanac Canadian Lacrosse Almanac
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 12, 2002
                    If you scroll down to the bottom of the message,
                    there's a hint!

                    D!

                    > can someone please send me some info on how to get
                    > off of this list
                    > please???????????


                    =====
                    David Stewart-Candy

                    International Ice Hockey Almanac
                    Canadian Lacrosse Almanac
                    East Vancouver, British Columbia

                    Just say "NO! to the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver

                    ______________________________________________________________________
                    Web-hosting solutions for home and business! http://website.yahoo.ca
                  • Lloyd Davis
                    ... Don t know if I can agree they were that far down the depth chart. Both goalies were drafted in 75 (Sauve 17th overall, Edwards 89th). Both turned pro
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 13, 2002
                      on 2/12/02 1:55 PM, David Stewart-Candy at icehockeyalmanac@... wrote:

                      > What I seem to had found interesting with Buffalo's
                      > revolving door of goalies, was that both Edwards and
                      > Sauve were pretty far down on the depth chart (didn't
                      > one or both spend some time on Buffalo's farm's farm
                      > team in Charlotte).

                      Don't know if I can agree they were that far down the depth chart. Both
                      goalies were drafted in '75 (Sauve 17th overall, Edwards 89th). Both turned
                      pro immediately thereafter.

                      Sauve, who was 19, did play part of '75-76 in Charlotte. Edwards was 20 and
                      got into 39 games in Hershey as a first-year pro, becoming an AHL Second
                      Team All-Star.

                      Up in Buffalo, they were pretty well set with Desjardins, who at 31 looked
                      to have a good five years left in him. (In fact, the year when he suffered
                      the eye injury that effectively ended his career -- '76-77 -- it was
                      arguably his best season to date: 30 wins and his lowest GAA since the days
                      when he was Tony O's backup).

                      Considering that Edwards and Sauve were 21 and 20 when they made their NHL
                      debuts, I'd say they were fast-tracked!

                      (This is wild: Sauve was a First Team All-Star in the QMJHL in '73-74 with a
                      5.65 GAA. Forget about the centre red line -- did they even have blue lines
                      in that league! <G>)


                      >
                      > What happened to Don Edwards? He had a few seasons
                      > there of brilliance and then disappeared off the face
                      > of the earth. Was he the 1970s answer to Jim Carey?

                      Dunno if I'd go that far. He played a heck of a lot of hockey in Buffalo,
                      and was still the #1 guy the year before the Sabres traded him.

                      At first I wanted to say that Tom Barrasso happened to him, but that's not
                      true: Edwards was dealt to Calgary just before the '82 draft, while Barrasso
                      didn't show up till '83.

                      Maybe Scotty Bowman happened to him. There was a lot of housecleaning going
                      on in those days.

                      As for what happened in Calgary, he had a green defence (Macoun, Eloranta,
                      Reinhart and MacInnis), and when your top forwards are Lanny McDonald (66
                      goals) and Kent Nilsson, how much backchecking are you inclined to do? It
                      also looks as if Lemelin outplayed Edwards, and earned the top job (which he
                      quickly lost to Mike Vernon). Still, it's a pretty steep slope from the
                      Vezina Trophy in 1980 to the Brantford Mott's Clamatos in 1986. (The Leafs
                      actually owned his rights during his year in Brantford; meanwhile they were
                      busy screwing up the careers of Bester & Wregget.)

                      > As it all relates to Bromley, the fact that Buffalo
                      > went with the geriatric Crozier over Bromley in the
                      > playoffs doesn't look to good on Bromley.

                      Oddly enough, Crozier wasn't geriatric -- he turned 33 in March '75. (I will
                      grant, however, that he had some hard miles on him, and that up until five
                      years ago I, too, would have considered a 33-year-old goalie to be geriatric
                      <g>). Bear in mind that Imlach favoured the "old pappies," so he was bound
                      to pick Crozier over the 25-year-old Bromley.

                      --
                      Lloyd Davis
                      Lloyd Davis Publishing Services
                      201-488 Danforth Avenue
                      Toronto, ON M4K 1P6
                      416 465 6999 /// 416 462 0230 (fax)
                      loydavis@...
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