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Interesting Blog

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  • Craig
    Back in the 1970-71 season Esso Service Stations (Esso is the trade name of Imperial Oil of Canada which is mainly owned by Exxon Oil) put out a series of NHL
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 3, 2007
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      Back in the 1970-71 season Esso Service Stations (Esso is the trade name of Imperial Oil of Canada which is mainly owned by Exxon Oil) put out a series of NHL player stickers (or some called them stamps) called "Power Players". These stickers or stamps had the name, and picture of a current NHL player. They could be put into a stamp album. When you filled up for gas at Esso you'd be given some of these stickers. I have a complete 1970-71 album with every sticker in it. To this day I enjoy going through it as it brings back some nice memories.

      Anyway I came across the attached blog. While this fellow talks about Power Player stamps he also talks about some other early 70's NHL related matters that I am sure will be of interest to many here.

      Craig

      http://essopowerplayers.blogspot.com/




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • goaliedave
      Your post comes as I prepare to move houses and (once gain) pack up all my hockey memorabilia. I have enjoyed going over my stuff, and my mother s stuff from
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 4, 2007
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        Your post comes as I prepare to move houses and (once gain) pack up all my hockey memorabilia. I have enjoyed going over my stuff, and my mother's stuff from when she was in her 20s, for myself and with my kids. I'm 49 and I think my generation was raised with a healthy interest and respect for history. Being Canadian, hockey history is a big part of that.

        However, I fear that my kids' generation does not have much interest in history. Their world is more focussed on the present and themselves. My kids are now both teenagers and as we pack for our move, they are interested in personal memories (like an autographed picture with favourite hockey player, or a particular school project) but not much interested in general stuff like Esso Power Play booklets and Senators programs and media guides from their early days of watching hockey.

        To those of you who have older kids or teach high school or college or hang out at memorabilia shows... what is your take on it? Am I making a mistake by selling off all my stuff on ebay or were the NHL superstars right when they did this?

        Dave in Whitby
        Just wondering

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • DAVE SOUTTER
        Dave: Being the exact same age as you, I understand where you re coming from. Here is my advice: You should sell your memorabilia if you: A) need the money;
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 4, 2007
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          Dave:

          Being the exact same age as you, I understand where you're coming from. Here is my advice:

          You should sell your memorabilia if you: A) need the money; B) have totally lost interest in it; C) don't have room to store it all; D) your wife is threatening divorce. Otherwise, I would hang on to it.

          Even if they seem indifferent today, your kids may develop an interest in all that stuff later on. I remember turning 14 or 15. At the time, I had no use for my old hockey and baseball cards. My dad told me he would hold on to them for me, although back then I didn't understand why. He said one day I may want them back. Several years ago, he brought a couple of boxes over to my house filled with those old cards. I am grateful he did that for me.

          I now share those old cards with my 10 year-old son. I will do the same for him as my dad did for me if and when my son's interest wanes.

          Good luck with your move.

          Dave Soutter




          ----- Original Message -----
          From: goaliedave<mailto:goaliedave@...>
          To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:hockhist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2007 10:30 AM
          Subject: [hockhist] Re:Interesting Blog


          Your post comes as I prepare to move houses and (once gain) pack up all my hockey memorabilia. I have enjoyed going over my stuff, and my mother's stuff from when she was in her 20s, for myself and with my kids. I'm 49 and I think my generation was raised with a healthy interest and respect for history. Being Canadian, hockey history is a big part of that.

          However, I fear that my kids' generation does not have much interest in history. Their world is more focussed on the present and themselves. My kids are now both teenagers and as we pack for our move, they are interested in personal memories (like an autographed picture with favourite hockey player, or a particular school project) but not much interested in general stuff like Esso Power Play booklets and Senators programs and media guides from their early days of watching hockey.

          To those of you who have older kids or teach high school or college or hang out at memorabilia shows... what is your take on it? Am I making a mistake by selling off all my stuff on ebay or were the NHL superstars right when they did this?

          Dave in Whitby
          Just wondering

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Craig
          Dave, I wonder if history has more meaning for our generation due to the fact that when we were growing up hockey or indeed all sports were not as available
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 5, 2007
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            Dave,

            I wonder if history has more meaning for our generation due to the fact that when we were growing up hockey or indeed all sports were not as "available" to us. We only saw the stars on a few occasions on TV (this of course was the days of only network TV) and in the paper. An item such as Esso Power Players gave us the chance to see stars and indeed players from teams such as California LA, etc that we rarely saw. This was very captivating to young fans.

            Fans today can see any game they want. In a sense the magic of pro sports is somewhat diminished.

            Craig



            ----- Original Message -----
            From: goaliedave
            To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2007 12:30 PM
            Subject: [hockhist] Re:Interesting Blog


            Your post comes as I prepare to move houses and (once gain) pack up all my hockey memorabilia. I have enjoyed going over my stuff, and my mother's stuff from when she was in her 20s, for myself and with my kids. I'm 49 and I think my generation was raised with a healthy interest and respect for history. Being Canadian, hockey history is a big part of that.

            However, I fear that my kids' generation does not have much interest in history. Their world is more focussed on the present and themselves. My kids are now both teenagers and as we pack for our move, they are interested in personal memories (like an autographed picture with favourite hockey player, or a particular school project) but not much interested in general stuff like Esso Power Play booklets and Senators programs and media guides from their early days of watching hockey.

            To those of you who have older kids or teach high school or college or hang out at memorabilia shows... what is your take on it? Am I making a mistake by selling off all my stuff on ebay or were the NHL superstars right when they did this?

            Dave in Whitby
            Just wondering

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • zpmboca@aol.com
            In a message dated 8/5/2007 5:51:18 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, bflynn3@cogeco.ca writes: Dave, I wonder if history has more meaning for our generation due to
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 5, 2007
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              In a message dated 8/5/2007 5:51:18 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
              bflynn3@... writes:

              Dave,

              I wonder if history has more meaning for our generation due to the fact that
              when we were growing up hockey or indeed all sports were not as "available"
              to us. We only saw the stars on a few occasions on TV (this of course was the
              days of only network TV) and in the paper. An item such as Esso Power
              Players gave us the chance to see stars and indeed players from teams such as
              California LA, etc that we rarely saw. This was very captivating to young fans.

              Fans today can see any game they want. In a sense the magic of pro sports is
              somewhat diminished.

              Craig


              I agree with you, Craig. When I was a kid in NYC, there were no hockey games
              at all on TV. Our only exposure to hockey was when we saw games live at the
              Garden a few times a year. When the Rangers finally worked out a deal to
              televise about 18-20 games in 1962-63, it was a major victory for hockey fans
              here. Each game, typically on Saturday nights, was an eagerly anticipated event,
              partly because it was rare. The current glut of games in today's era takes a
              lot of that feeling away.

              Z. Peter Mitchell



              ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
              http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Brad
              I have to agree. I have the NHL Center Ice Package and while I love it, the specialness of a televised game is not even close as it was to when I was a kid. It
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 5, 2007
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                I have to agree. I have the NHL Center Ice Package and while I love it,
                the specialness of a televised game is not even close as it was to when
                I was a kid. It used to be the Rangers on Saturday night (Jim Gordan and
                Bill Chadwick when I was a kid) and the NBC Game of the Week on Sunday
                afternoon. That was the only time I would see 2 non-NY area teams play
                which was always exciting and offered a different perspective.

                The All-Star game also has been greatly diminished by the increased
                exposure. It used to be a big deal to see all the best players on the
                ice together but the fact is, now, I can watch Sidney Crosby play 75-80
                games this season if I wanted to with the Center Ice Package. That's not
                a complaint mind you, but it certainly takes away from the sense of awe
                we had as kids whenever we got to watch the best players in the league
                because it was often a rare treat.

                Brad

                zpmboca@... wrote:

                >
                > In a message dated 8/5/2007 5:51:18 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                > bflynn3@... <mailto:bflynn3%40cogeco.ca> writes:
                >
                > Dave,
                >
                > I wonder if history has more meaning for our generation due to the
                > fact that
                > when we were growing up hockey or indeed all sports were not as
                > "available"
                > to us. We only saw the stars on a few occasions on TV (this of course
                > was the
                > days of only network TV) and in the paper. An item such as Esso Power
                > Players gave us the chance to see stars and indeed players from teams
                > such as
                > California LA, etc that we rarely saw. This was very captivating to
                > young fans.
                >
                > Fans today can see any game they want. In a sense the magic of pro
                > sports is
                > somewhat diminished.
                >
                > Craig
                >
                > I agree with you, Craig. When I was a kid in NYC, there were no hockey
                > games
                > at all on TV. Our only exposure to hockey was when we saw games live
                > at the
                > Garden a few times a year. When the Rangers finally worked out a deal to
                > televise about 18-20 games in 1962-63, it was a major victory for
                > hockey fans
                > here. Each game, typically on Saturday nights, was an eagerly
                > anticipated event,
                > partly because it was rare. The current glut of games in today's era
                > takes a
                > lot of that feeling away.
                >
                > Z. Peter Mitchell
                >
                > ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new
                > AOL at
                > http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour
                > <http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour>
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
              • William Underwood
                Not to mention a couple of other factors. Free Agency has made it tougher to identify a player with a club and for fans to bond to the players. The thought of
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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                  Not to mention a couple of other factors.



                  Free Agency has made it tougher to identify a player with a club and for
                  fans to bond to the players. The thought of a Jean Beliveau finishing
                  anywhere but Montreal or a Bobby Clarke ever being anything but a Flyer was
                  unthinkable!



                  I think the younger generation has less of a sense of history. It has been
                  de emphasized in schools and often sanitized to the point of being a PC
                  Fairy Tale! It never ceases to amaze me the TERRIBLE state of knowledge of
                  kids when it comes to history. Some of the surveys are shocking to the point
                  that a SCARY number of kids would fail to see what is so funny when John
                  Beluschi said in Animal House (when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor:". Hell
                  many would ask "what is Pearl Harbor dude." To all too many, ancient history
                  is anything past last year.



                  And it is not even totally the school's fault.we live in a society of
                  planned obsolescence. Are the houses that are built today likely to be like
                  my sturdy old 90 year old structure? No! We tear history down to replace
                  with the gaudy, chic, hastily built McHouse. We buy things EXPECTING them to
                  break and not be reparable in a short time. At one time you would buy a car
                  or appliance and expect 10-20 years.these days if you get 5 years of use it
                  is GREAT! This thing that I am typing at is only a few years old but is
                  already a "dinosaur". :-) Nothing is made to last.you buy, and then it dies
                  or becomes too dated to be efficient and you plunge yourself into debt
                  again! And who actually spends MONEY? I am driven nuts by the idiot at the
                  store who has to sue plastic or a check to shop for GROCERIES! But we are at
                  that point.no sense of time.there is no past or future just the present.we
                  have reduced ourselves to more base animals.



                  How many parents spend their way into debt and oblivion? I know people who
                  go on 5 vacations a year but put NO college money down.grandmom and granddad
                  had to take care of that! Another couple's child actually once laughed at
                  their grandmom saying "nobody pays for a car today".meaning that all she has
                  ever seen is plastic.never REAL money changing hands NOW.just debt. People
                  fail to anticipate being old.after all the ads tell you how you can stay
                  young forever or at least look it.so "what me worry about retirement.there
                  are vacations to take and new cars to buy."So spend thrift mom and dad are
                  guilty too.



                  And it is all a bit scary because he who ignores the past is doomed to
                  repeat its mistakes and he who fails to plan for the future can be even
                  worse off.



                  So then new generation not only is not a s conditioned tom appreciate the
                  past but also has a past that is so muddled in sports."I got a Gretzky
                  sweater".."Oh yeah dude, which team?" It is just not like a Beliveau sweater
                  meaning ONE THING.#4 rouge blanc et bleu.



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Michael-John Kozak
                  On the topic on interesting blogs, I present some good independent websites if you have or have not seen them. I list these as top priority on my Oiler fan
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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                    On the topic on interesting blogs, I present some good independent
                    websites if you have or have not seen them. I list these as top
                    priority on my Oiler fan site.

                    The first two are basic and then further detail cap/salary references.
                    http://www.nhlnumbers.com/
                    http://www.nhlscap.com/

                    And this one a member of our forum pointed out as to the draft picks
                    owned by team. If this person(s) keep it up to date, this will be solid:
                    http://walzy.hd-graphics.de/draftpicks.php

                    --MJ
                  • Larry Sekuler
                    Bill: Very, very well stated. I would like to be able to disagree with at least some of what you have said - but alas, I can t, as every single point you make
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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                      Bill:

                      Very, very well stated. I would like to be able to disagree with at least some of what you have said - but alas, I can't, as every single point you make is all too true.

                      And not only is it true that he who ignores the past is doomed to
                      repeat its mistakes, but we are already seeing instances of that happening in today's society.

                      Larry Sekuler

                      -----Original Message-----
                      >From: William Underwood <wausport@...>
                      >Sent: Aug 6, 2007 6:12 AM
                      >To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: [hockhist] Re: Interesting Blog
                      >
                      >Not to mention a couple of other factors.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >Free Agency has made it tougher to identify a player with a club and for
                      >fans to bond to the players. The thought of a Jean Beliveau finishing
                      >anywhere but Montreal or a Bobby Clarke ever being anything but a Flyer was
                      >unthinkable!
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >I think the younger generation has less of a sense of history. It has been
                      >de emphasized in schools and often sanitized to the point of being a PC
                      >Fairy Tale! It never ceases to amaze me the TERRIBLE state of knowledge of
                      >kids when it comes to history. Some of the surveys are shocking to the point
                      >that a SCARY number of kids would fail to see what is so funny when John
                      >Beluschi said in Animal House (when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor:". Hell
                      >many would ask "what is Pearl Harbor dude." To all too many, ancient history
                      >is anything past last year.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >And it is not even totally the school's fault.we live in a society of
                      >planned obsolescence. Are the houses that are built today likely to be like
                      >my sturdy old 90 year old structure? No! We tear history down to replace
                      >with the gaudy, chic, hastily built McHouse. We buy things EXPECTING them to
                      >break and not be reparable in a short time. At one time you would buy a car
                      >or appliance and expect 10-20 years.these days if you get 5 years of use it
                      >is GREAT! This thing that I am typing at is only a few years old but is
                      >already a "dinosaur". :-) Nothing is made to last.you buy, and then it dies
                      >or becomes too dated to be efficient and you plunge yourself into debt
                      >again! And who actually spends MONEY? I am driven nuts by the idiot at the
                      >store who has to sue plastic or a check to shop for GROCERIES! But we are at
                      >that point.no sense of time.there is no past or future just the present.we
                      >have reduced ourselves to more base animals.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >How many parents spend their way into debt and oblivion? I know people who
                      >go on 5 vacations a year but put NO college money down.grandmom and granddad
                      >had to take care of that! Another couple's child actually once laughed at
                      >their grandmom saying "nobody pays for a car today".meaning that all she has
                      >ever seen is plastic.never REAL money changing hands NOW.just debt. People
                      >fail to anticipate being old.after all the ads tell you how you can stay
                      >young forever or at least look it.so "what me worry about retirement.there
                      >are vacations to take and new cars to buy."So spend thrift mom and dad are
                      >guilty too.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >And it is all a bit scary because he who ignores the past is doomed to
                      >repeat its mistakes and he who fails to plan for the future can be even
                      >worse off.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >So then new generation not only is not a s conditioned tom appreciate the
                      >past but also has a past that is so muddled in sports."I got a Gretzky
                      >sweater".."Oh yeah dude, which team?" It is just not like a Beliveau sweater
                      >meaning ONE THING.#4 rouge blanc et bleu.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • goaliedave
                      Thanks for the replies... they make sense; it is not as big a deal these days, and so perhaps they aren t treasured memories to save and revisit when older.
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 7, 2007
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                        Thanks for the replies... they make sense; it is not as big a deal these days, and so perhaps they aren't treasured memories to save and revisit when older. I'm going to save a lot of my stuff and I know that at least I will look forward to looking at it again :)

                        Dave in Whitby

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • goaliedave
                        Bill, That s much how I feel as well. People work harder to make more money to buy things more often... instead of having things last longer so we don t have
                        Message 11 of 12 , Aug 7, 2007
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                          Bill,
                          That's much how I feel as well. People work harder to make more money to buy things more often... instead of having things last longer so we don't have to work as hard.

                          Parents don't have much time to sit and talk with their kids these days about current events let alone past events. It's sad if it is being de-emphasized in the schools as well.

                          Dave in Whitby

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • epenaltybox
                          I don t disagree with much of what was said, but would like to add this perspective. When I was in my teens and my dad was in his late-30s and early 40s, he
                          Message 12 of 12 , Aug 9, 2007
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                            I don't disagree with much of what was said, but would like to add
                            this perspective.

                            When I was in my teens and my dad was in his late-30s and early 40s,
                            he held onto his Elvis stuff, the 50s rock era when he was a high
                            school d.j., his stories about delivering the newspaper to one of his
                            two idols - (Al Kaline).

                            His other idol was Gordie Howe. My dad tried to introduce me to his
                            idol when I was 7 on a skate at the Olympia. I was too tired to stay
                            awake (don't think for a second I wouldn't stay up all night to talk
                            with Mr. Hockey now).

                            When I met Gordie again, about four years ago, I was able to trade
                            him a copy of Deceptions for a note to my dad. He sent a beautiful
                            8x11 table card with a personal note. One of the best birthday gifts
                            my dad ever had.

                            Your kids will grow up, and they will have rememberances that will
                            mean something to them, and they will complain about their kids the
                            same way. The study of history is funny - it seems to become more
                            important as you get older.

                            Morey

                            --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "goaliedave" <goaliedave@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Thanks for the replies... they make sense; it is not as big a deal
                            these days, and so perhaps they aren't treasured memories to save and
                            revisit when older. I'm going to save a lot of my stuff and I know
                            that at least I will look forward to looking at it again :)
                            >
                            > Dave in Whitby
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
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