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Re: [hockhist] Re: Canada-Sweden

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  • Swanrvr80@aol.com
    In a message dated 6/30/2007 6:30:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Paul_Patskou@yahoo.com writes: I ve been researching a number of sources for new information on
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 1 2:55 AM
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      In a message dated 6/30/2007 6:30:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
      Paul_Patskou@... writes:

      I've been researching a number of sources for new information on the
      Canada-Sweden series in 1972. Some books were helpful but others like
      Vic Hadfield's book had fiction in it. Espo's latest book had facts
      wrong too. I can excuse Espo because his book was written a few years
      ago and memories fade but Hadfield's account was written at the time.


      What parts of Hadfield's book were fiction? Thanks.

      Jay



      ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • paul_patskou
      Things like: I wasn t even near the puck when a Swedish player comes up and with an axelike motion slashes me across the arm. I retaliated this time by
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 1 8:34 AM
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        Things like:

        "I wasn't even near the puck when a Swedish player comes up and with an
        axelike motion slashes me across the arm. I retaliated this time by
        clipping him in the nose. He was quite an actor. He skated around the
        ice pointing to his bloody nose. Then he stood in front of the TV
        cameras and did the same thing."

        ---In reality, according to the film, Sjoberg was nowhere near Hadfield
        who clashed with a another Swede in the corner. Hadfield came to the
        front of the net and purposely slashed his stick right at Sjoberg's
        face. Nothing to do with getting the puck. And after the incident all
        Sjoberg did was skate to the end of the ice to go to the dressing room.
        He did look over to Hadfield in the penalty box but never made a signal.
        All Hadfield was doing in the penalty box was fixing his care - not
        very concerned at all.

        ---------

        "He got into a fight with Ulf Sterner, who once played for the Rangers.
        Sterner stuck the blade of his stick into Cashman's mouth and left Cash
        with a slice tongue. Nice guys."

        ---Well, there was no fight for one thing. It was Cashman with his
        stick up going after Sterner along the boards. Sterner put his own
        stick up in defence.

        ----------

        "Ron Ellis was jumped from behind and kicked in the head. That was
        never mentioned. But on taped replays on TV you could see the Swedes
        spearing and kicking."

        ---If Ellis had such a vile thing done to him, someone covering the
        game for a newspaper or any other player or Canadian official's account
        of this incident would have at least mentioned it. Ellis never even
        mentioned it in his own book when he wrote about the 2 games.

        And 'taped replays'?? What access did Hadfield have to something that
        was televised only in Sweden? I'm assuming he stayed in his hotel room
        to watch a replay, if there was a replay that night. From all accounts,
        the Team Canada players went out on the town that night. And, I'm sure
        that Swedish TV would not be showing any highlights that showed their
        own players spearing and kicking.

        It's that sort of thing. It seemed to me that Hadfield's book was
        simply for damage control of his reputation after the '72 series. It's
        one thing if he left the team to come home. That was his choice. But
        the fact that he was trying to recruit others to go with him could have
        done a lot of damage. Fortunately, only 3 others did and not the up to
        10 or 12 that he claims were going to leave.

        Hadfield actually played ok in the second Canada-Sweden game and scored
        a pretty skillful goal. Because of that, he might have thought that he
        would be playing with Ratelle and Gilbert in Moscow.


        --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, Swanrvr80@... wrote:
        >>
        > What parts of Hadfield's book were fiction? Thanks.
        >
        > Jay
        >
        >
        >
        > ************************************** See what's free at
        http://www.aol.com
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Mikael Uhlin
        ... I haven t got any newspapers from 1972 but I can check out what they wrote about the games in the Swedish Hockey Annual from that year at the library. The
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 1 9:40 AM
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          "paul_patskou" <Paul_Patskou@...> wrote:
          >I think a great source for correct information
          >are the newspaper accounts of the time. These
          >stories don't have the often repeated stories
          >that weren't exactly accurate.

          I haven't got any newspapers from 1972 but I can check out what they
          wrote about the games in the Swedish Hockey Annual from that year at
          the library. The accounts in those Annuals are usually very detailed
          and based on contemporary news reports.

          >I don't think the Team Canada coaching staff
          >made much of an attempt to show their players
          >how good the Soviets were. An example is that
          >Sinden foolishly showed the players the 1958
          >'Go Dunnies Go' film from the Worlds in Oslo.
          >That was 14 years prior. I often thought that
          >since Sinden received the gold medal in that
          >film, he might have wanted his team to see it.
          >A better example would have been to show the
          >game between the Soviets and the Canadian
          >National team in late 1969 before it was disbanded.
          >Kharlamov scores a skilled goal and Tretiak
          >is playing well in net. Ken Dryden was on the
          >bench watching as the spare goalie. That tape
          >was available at the time - so were the 1972
          >World Championship and Olympic games.

          I checked another sports annual (with much less info) and they
          expressed their disappointment that the Canadians had made such bad
          preparations before the Summit series and the games vs Sweden. The
          writer (Lennart Wrethagen) also suggested that an actual club from
          the NHL like the Bruins or the Rangers might have played better and
          tighter than the selected team did.

          >Thanks for the info on Sterner - that
          >makes things clearer. The only other
          >info I found was that Sterner missed
          >curfew one night and was given his
          >release by the Cougars. Sounded strange
          >to me.

          But it's also a fact that Ulf Sterner often was involved in
          conflicts during his time as a player and more than once did he
          leave an assignment for some reason.

          >As for Esposito, he played on "Team Ugly" in
          >1977. The worst offender on that team was
          >Wilf Paiement and there were a few others
          >worse than Esposito. It was a quite an
          >embarassing display of violence. A number of
          >those games exist on tape and I think its best
          >that they never get rebroadcast. I didn't like
          >Esposito much before the '72 series but I have
          >to say that the greatest and most determined
          >leadership that any hockey player ever
          >displayed was Esposito in the last few games
          >in Moscow, particularly game 8.

          In fairness to Espo, it's true that the Sports Annual I mentioned
          above pointed him out as the MVP of the Summit Series and Wrethagen
          was also impressed at his skills both as an individual and as a
          member of the team. The 1977 Worlds had yet to come...

          However, it's also worth mentioning that in 1979, Anders Hedberg
          were praising Espo when they were playing together (or at least in
          the same club) in the Rangers.
        • paul_patskou
          If you could check out any accounts from the Swedish side, that would be very valuable and I m sure others would like to see as well. It seems that Sinden and
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 1 7:13 PM
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            If you could check out any accounts from the Swedish side, that would
            be very valuable and I'm sure others would like to see as well.

            It seems that Sinden and Ferguson did obtain and view game films of the
            recent Soviet victories. They told the players about the films but
            there is nothing to indicate that any of the players viewed them during
            training camp.

            Sinden did say he had set up a viewing for the team the night before
            the Montreal game.

            Regarding the violence in the Canada-Sweden series, Sinden and every
            other Canadian account are emphatic about the dirty play of the Swedish
            players. so much so, that there had to be something going on. I'd like
            to hear from anyone who gets to watch the Canada-Sweden game to give
            their opinion.
          • Swanrvr80@aol.com
            Good points. Thanks. Jay ************************************** See what s free at http://www.aol.com. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 20 , Jul 2 2:21 AM
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              Good points. Thanks.

              Jay



              ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Mikael Uhlin
              I went to the library today and borrowed that annual I mentioned. There seem to be quite a lot about Team Canada s visit to Europe in 1972 but I ll have to
              Message 6 of 20 , Jul 2 1:33 PM
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                I went to the library today and borrowed that annual I mentioned.
                There seem to be quite a lot about Team Canada's visit to Europe in
                1972 but I'll have to read it and translate relevant parts and it
                might take a couple of days. Apart from the Swedish viewpoints, I also
                noticed some Soviet and Swiss accounts and there might be more.

                Regarding the actual games, I've never seen them. I was 9 years old at
                the time and not yet interested in hockey, but that changed soon
                afterwards.
              • Mikael Uhlin
                ... My computer at home has crashed - I m writing this at work - so it may take a couple of weeks...
                Message 7 of 20 , Jul 12 6:32 AM
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                  --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Mikael Uhlin" <u-line@...> wrote:
                  >I'll have to read it and translate relevant
                  >parts and it might take a couple of days.

                  My computer at home has crashed - I'm writing this at work - so it may
                  take a couple of weeks...
                • paul_patskou
                  No problem, and I m looking forward to seeing what you come up with. Further to the 25th Anniversary DVD set, the producers are considering adding Game 9 as
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jul 13 3:23 PM
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                    No problem, and I'm looking forward to seeing what you come up with.

                    Further to the 25th Anniversary DVD set, the producers are considering
                    adding Game 9 as well as a limited edition card set.

                    --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Mikael Uhlin" <u-line@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Mikael Uhlin" <u-line@> wrote:
                    > >I'll have to read it and translate relevant
                    > >parts and it might take a couple of days.
                    >
                    > My computer at home has crashed - I'm writing this at work - so it
                    may
                    > take a couple of weeks...
                    >
                  • Mikael Uhlin
                    So, finally I m back online and finally I ve found time to look through that old Swedish Yearbook Årets ishockey 1973 (Icehockey of the year 1973). It
                    Message 9 of 20 , Sep 16, 2007
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                      So, finally I'm back online and finally I've found time to look
                      through that old Swedish Yearbook "Årets ishockey 1973" (Icehockey of
                      the year 1973).

                      It contains three short bits and one long "essay" on the Summit
                      series. The short bits are by Ulf Jansson from Sweden, Peter Brie from
                      Switzerland and Jevgenij Rubin from the USSR. The long essay is
                      written by the legendary Swedish journalist and sports executive
                      Rudolf "R:et" (the R) Eklöw. I don't know much about Brie and Rubin
                      apart from that they wrote for papers "Sport Zürich" and
                      "Futboll-Chokkej" respectively.

                      Eklöw was a very colorful person born around the turn of the past
                      century, mainly known as a journalist but also as a soccer refeere in
                      the 30s (famous when officiating in a game between nazi-Germany and
                      Mussolini's Italy for NOT raising his arm in a "Sieg Heil" like
                      everybody else) and later holding positions in both the Swedish
                      soccer- and icehockey associations. He apparently also was vice
                      president of the IIHF in the years 1957-66. Eklöw favoured the
                      old-style icehockey, the one played in the 1930s, and he strongly
                      opposed rule changes like the one in 1969 when bodychecking all over
                      the rink was allowed in Europe.

                      Jansson was a much younger guy, and an advocate of North American
                      icehockey. Apart from reporting on icehockey both in papers and on
                      radio, he also had acted as a kind of manager when guys like Ulf
                      Sterner and Juha Widing were trying out for the NHL in the early 60s.

                      For years, Jansson and Eklöw had been arguing publicly over which
                      version of hockey that was the best. Regarding Ulf Sterner, Eklöw had
                      predicted that he soon would return beaten and manhandled. It didn't
                      turn out quite like that but the discussions didn't end.

                      After the Summit Series and the adjacent games between Sweden and
                      Canada, Jansson seemed a bit disappointed. He concluded that the game
                      of icehockey apparently was getting more brutal, and he cited the
                      bloody fight between Russians and Czechs in the World Championships
                      and also similar violence in that tournament between Sweden and
                      Finland. One reason, Jansson speculated, were the Summit Series that
                      had started the 1972-73 season, games where "big money and prestige
                      were at stakes, forcing Phil Esposito & co to win at every cost".
                      Jansson also pointed out that the Russians were less disciplined after
                      Bobrov had taken over as coach after Tarasov. A third reason could
                      have been that the refeeres no longer kept up with the pace and were
                      unable to see everything.

                      Eklöw wrote a personal essay, mostly based on the Sweden-Canada games,
                      and basically summarizing the dislike he's had for Canadian icehockey
                      for years. He critized the majority of North American hockey experts
                      for not having visited Europe after WW2 to study how hockey had
                      developed over here. In Europe, most icehockey experts and fans had
                      been waiting for years for a Summit Series and Eklöw blamed the lack
                      of exchange on the "chaotic" structure of the organized Canadian
                      icehockey. Whereas most other nations have only one organization, by
                      1972 Canada had a lot, like CAHA, CIAU, NHL, WHA and so on. And once
                      the Summit Series were negotiated, Eklöw was disappointed that the
                      Canadians went into the Series so badly prepared, especially when
                      comparing with the Russians who were practicing around the year. And
                      of course, Eklöw didn't like the Canadian style of icehockey, neither.
                      He critized the frequent use of boardings and interferences and also
                      that the consequence of hating to lose, i.e.; "If I can't win by
                      sticking to the rules, the rules are stupid!"

                      Brie didn't write much of the Summit Series but stated that "the start
                      of the season was sensational" since "the games between Team Canada
                      and the USSR were fantastic, tough, exciting and fascinating". He also
                      concluded that in the World Championships, Canada was missed more than
                      ever.

                      Rubin started out by stating that people had been waiting a long time
                      for games between Team Canada and the USSR, both in the Soviet Union
                      and around the world. The Soviets had prepared themselves for these
                      games for several years, but Rubin wrote that despite of this, not
                      many thought beforehand that the first games versus the legendary
                      NHL-ers would turn out that successful for Russian and European icehockey.

                      Rubin also described what he called the "Two Schools of icehockey".
                      Europeans show a collective thinking, combinations on the ice, big
                      tactical flexibility and quick tempo, while North Americans are
                      sporting an extraordinary technical skill when checking man-to-man,
                      high efficiency in front of the goals, hard and surprising shots and
                      an admiring ability to fight for victory until the whistle blows.

                      --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "paul_patskou" <Paul_Patskou@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > No problem, and I'm looking forward to seeing what you come up with.
                      >
                      > Further to the 25th Anniversary DVD set, the producers are considering
                      > adding Game 9 as well as a limited edition card set.
                      >
                      > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Mikael Uhlin" <u-line@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Mikael Uhlin" <u-line@> wrote:
                      > > >I'll have to read it and translate relevant
                      > > >parts and it might take a couple of days.
                      > >
                      > > My computer at home has crashed - I'm writing this at work - so it
                      > may
                      > > take a couple of weeks...
                      > >
                      >
                    • paul_patskou
                      Thanks for the interesting information from the articles you found. I can agree with much of what is said. Not sure about what Eklöw said about all the
                      Message 10 of 20 , Sep 16, 2007
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                        Thanks for the interesting information from the articles you found. I
                        can agree with much of what is said. Not sure about what Eklöw said
                        about all the interference in Canadian hockey. My view is that there
                        was much more interference in European hockey, although it may have
                        been more subtle. Interference in the NHL didn't really get prevalent
                        until Fred Shero had his Flyers use it as a tactic starting around
                        1973-74.

                        The DVD set is to be released around the last week of October as
                        production has been completed. The Documentary looks good and most of
                        the footage has never been seen as it came from the film out-takes.


                        --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Mikael Uhlin" <u-line@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > So, finally I'm back online and finally I've found time to look
                        > through that old Swedish Yearbook "Årets ishockey 1973" (Icehockey
                        of
                        > the year 1973).
                        >
                        > It contains three short bits and one long "essay" on the Summit
                        > series. The short bits are by Ulf Jansson from Sweden, Peter Brie
                        from
                        > Switzerland and Jevgenij Rubin from the USSR. The long essay is
                        > written by the legendary Swedish journalist and sports executive
                        > Rudolf "R:et" (the R) Eklöw. I don't know much about Brie and Rubin
                        > apart from that they wrote for papers "Sport Zürich" and
                        > "Futboll-Chokkej" respectively.
                        >
                        > Eklöw was a very colorful person born around the turn of the past
                        > century, mainly known as a journalist but also as a soccer refeere
                        in
                        > the 30s (famous when officiating in a game between nazi-Germany and
                        > Mussolini's Italy for NOT raising his arm in a "Sieg Heil" like
                        > everybody else) and later holding positions in both the Swedish
                        > soccer- and icehockey associations. He apparently also was vice
                        > president of the IIHF in the years 1957-66. Eklöw favoured the
                        > old-style icehockey, the one played in the 1930s, and he strongly
                        > opposed rule changes like the one in 1969 when bodychecking all over
                        > the rink was allowed in Europe.
                        >
                        > Jansson was a much younger guy, and an advocate of North American
                        > icehockey. Apart from reporting on icehockey both in papers and on
                        > radio, he also had acted as a kind of manager when guys like Ulf
                        > Sterner and Juha Widing were trying out for the NHL in the early
                        60s.
                        >
                        > For years, Jansson and Eklöw had been arguing publicly over which
                        > version of hockey that was the best. Regarding Ulf Sterner, Eklöw
                        had
                        > predicted that he soon would return beaten and manhandled. It
                        didn't
                        > turn out quite like that but the discussions didn't end.
                        >
                        > After the Summit Series and the adjacent games between Sweden and
                        > Canada, Jansson seemed a bit disappointed. He concluded that the
                        game
                        > of icehockey apparently was getting more brutal, and he cited the
                        > bloody fight between Russians and Czechs in the World Championships
                        > and also similar violence in that tournament between Sweden and
                        > Finland. One reason, Jansson speculated, were the Summit Series that
                        > had started the 1972-73 season, games where "big money and prestige
                        > were at stakes, forcing Phil Esposito & co to win at every cost".
                        > Jansson also pointed out that the Russians were less disciplined
                        after
                        > Bobrov had taken over as coach after Tarasov. A third reason could
                        > have been that the refeeres no longer kept up with the pace and were
                        > unable to see everything.
                        >
                        > Eklöw wrote a personal essay, mostly based on the Sweden-Canada
                        games,
                        > and basically summarizing the dislike he's had for Canadian
                        icehockey
                        > for years. He critized the majority of North American hockey experts
                        > for not having visited Europe after WW2 to study how hockey had
                        > developed over here. In Europe, most icehockey experts and fans had
                        > been waiting for years for a Summit Series and Eklöw blamed the lack
                        > of exchange on the "chaotic" structure of the organized Canadian
                        > icehockey. Whereas most other nations have only one organization, by
                        > 1972 Canada had a lot, like CAHA, CIAU, NHL, WHA and so on. And once
                        > the Summit Series were negotiated, Eklöw was disappointed that the
                        > Canadians went into the Series so badly prepared, especially when
                        > comparing with the Russians who were practicing around the year. And
                        > of course, Eklöw didn't like the Canadian style of icehockey,
                        neither.
                        > He critized the frequent use of boardings and interferences and also
                        > that the consequence of hating to lose, i.e.; "If I can't win by
                        > sticking to the rules, the rules are stupid!"
                        >
                        > Brie didn't write much of the Summit Series but stated that "the
                        start
                        > of the season was sensational" since "the games between Team Canada
                        > and the USSR were fantastic, tough, exciting and fascinating". He
                        also
                        > concluded that in the World Championships, Canada was missed more
                        than
                        > ever.
                        >
                        > Rubin started out by stating that people had been waiting a long
                        time
                        > for games between Team Canada and the USSR, both in the Soviet Union
                        > and around the world. The Soviets had prepared themselves for these
                        > games for several years, but Rubin wrote that despite of this, not
                        > many thought beforehand that the first games versus the legendary
                        > NHL-ers would turn out that successful for Russian and European
                        icehockey.
                        >
                        > Rubin also described what he called the "Two Schools of icehockey".
                        > Europeans show a collective thinking, combinations on the ice, big
                        > tactical flexibility and quick tempo, while North Americans are
                        > sporting an extraordinary technical skill when checking man-to-man,
                        > high efficiency in front of the goals, hard and surprising shots and
                        > an admiring ability to fight for victory until the whistle blows.
                        >
                        > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "paul_patskou" <Paul_Patskou@>
                        wrote:
                        > >
                        > > No problem, and I'm looking forward to seeing what you come up
                        with.
                        > >
                        > > Further to the 25th Anniversary DVD set, the producers are
                        considering
                        > > adding Game 9 as well as a limited edition card set.
                        > >
                        > > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Mikael Uhlin" <u-line@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Mikael Uhlin" <u-line@> wrote:
                        > > > >I'll have to read it and translate relevant
                        > > > >parts and it might take a couple of days.
                        > > >
                        > > > My computer at home has crashed - I'm writing this at work - so
                        it
                        > > may
                        > > > take a couple of weeks...
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
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