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Re: Question for Edmonton Oiler fans

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  • dmdclassics
    ... singer? ... the ... Hi Matt That was quite a playoff run by our Oilers and was made even more memorable with moments such as the one you mentioned. I was
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 9, 2006
      --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "mhdibiase" <mhdibiase@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've been meaning to ask this question ever since the last Stanley
      > Cup finals. Right before game three, played at Rexall, I was much
      > taken by the way the man who sang "Oh Canada". He sang the first
      > verse and then allowed the audience to sing the second verse with
      > perfect timing before finishing the song himself.
      >
      > I forget the singer's name but I got the distinct impression that
      > what he was doing was an old familiar tradition with the Edmonton
      > fans (who hadn't been to a Stanley Cup final since 1990).
      >
      > Could any Edmonton fans shed light on my theory? Who was the
      singer?
      > And how he performed the Canadian anthem, was that an old tradition
      > of his?
      >
      > I thoroughly enjoyed how he did it! It would never have happened in
      > America.
      >
      > I also would like to add that it was amazing to see the love and
      > devotion the Edmonton fans displayed during the finals even when
      the
      > team was on the road they packed Rexall to watch the game on video.
      > That's dedication.
      >
      > It was sad to see Edmonton lose the finals.
      >
      > Matt
      >
      Hi Matt
      That was quite a playoff run by our Oilers and was made even more
      memorable with moments such as the one you mentioned. I was in
      attendance for every home playoff game. The anthem was sung by Paul
      Laurieau (pronounced Lo-ree-oh). There are a few reasons he was
      able to allow the fans to continue singing the anthem on their own.
      One was that we had been joining him very strongly prior to that.
      Also he apparently spoke with the Edmonton Oilers Brass and asked for
      permission to start the first few bars of the Canadian Anthem then
      allow the fans to continue on their own. The Oilers brass thought he
      should go ahead and try it and it was hugely successful. He is not
      doing that this regular season which is good. We are saving it up
      for another Playoff run. It makes it more of a playoff ritual and
      special boost for the players. Dave Martell
    • reorgman
      Doucet, Roger Doucet, Roger. Tenor, b Montreal 21 Apr 1919, d there 19 Jul 1981. As a boy, he sang at the Immaculée-Conception Church. The choir director,
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 10, 2006
        Doucet, Roger



        Doucet, Roger. Tenor, b Montreal 21 Apr 1919, d there 19 Jul 1981.
        As a boy, he sang at the Immaculée-Conception Church. The choir
        director, Émile Fontaine, gave him his first music lessons 1929-33 at
        the École St-François-Xavier. He studied voice 1938-40 with Céline
        Marier and Georges Toupin, 1940-1 with Sarah Fischer, and 1941-3 with
        Albertine Morin-Labrecque and participated during this time in
        amateur competitions. This led to engagements in several Montreal
        cabarets, including the Faisan bleu, the Casino Bellevue, and the
        Montmartre. Doucet later became a member of The Army Show, with which
        he toured Canada twice and visited several European countries. He
        left the army with the rank of sergeant and on his re-establishment
        allowance from the Department of Veterans' Affairs studied 1946-9
        with Alfredo Martino at the New York College of Music.
        Doucet continued his career in cabarets and on radio, taking part in
        the CBC opera broadcasts called 'Théâtre lyrique Molson'. On CBC
        TV's 'L'Heure du concert' he sang in excerpts from various operas,
        including The Barber of Seville (Count Almaviva), Les Pêcheurs de
        perles (Nadir), and Roméo et Juliette (Roméo). For the COC he was the
        Duke in Rigoletto (1950), the Prince in The Love of Three Oranges
        (1959), and Fenton in Nicolai's The Merry Wives of Windsor (touring
        production, 1960). During a European sojourn 1955-7, he sang in Le
        Comte Ory at the Glyndebourne Festival and broadcast for the BBC in
        London and for the NDR in Hamburg. From 1971 until his death he
        sang 'O Canada' at televised hockey games in the Montreal Forum. He
        began doing the same for the Alouettes' football games in 1974 and
        the Expos' baseball games in 1977. In 1980 he was made a Member of
        the Order of Canada.
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