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Alexander Cup

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  • goaliedave
    Hi all, I did a quick look into the Alexander Cup questions. I dropped in at the HHOF (Kevin Shea) and the National Archives in Ottawa. There isn t much put
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 1, 2006
      Hi all,

      I did a quick look into the Alexander Cup questions. I dropped in at the HHOF (Kevin Shea) and the National Archives in Ottawa. There isn't much put together on this although next week I'm going to contact the SIHR folks ... someone there must have something.

      At the Archives I got lucky with my first microfilm pick, March 1953 Montreal Gazette .The sports news on page 25 March 2 laid out the status which I can summarize as follows:

      It seems there were a few things happening at once. First of course the NHL Habs were trying to turn the QSHL pro so they could have Beliveau.

      Also, the Quebec branch (QAHA) had been suspended by the CAHA for allowing a suspended player to play, and they had until March 10 to determine whether they would appeal or leave the CAHA.

      Finally and as a direct result of the suspension by CAHA , the QSHL voted 'last night' to start negotiations with the Western (WHL) or American leagues (AHL) , both professional circuits, for a spring playoff series.

      Interestingly, it is also mentioned that this is" ... in the hope of reviving the rivalry of east and west that was demonstrated in they heyday of the Allan and Memorial Cup playdowns."

      "This action by the highly-ranked QSHL brings to an end the Major Series Playoff in which the Quebec league opposes the winners of the Maritime Major Hockey League for the Canadian championship."

      I will continue to research and document (if no one else has don it) the Alexander Cup stuff.

      This info seems to indicate that: (1) the Alexander Cup was the eastern Canadian senior amateur hockey championship (2) The Allan Cup was a lesser regarded, western championship at this point.

      All to say, if the new maritime senior hockey league has reclaimed the Alexander Cup to award this year, it appears they do have the pedigree to back up their right.

      Dave in Whitby

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Edwards
      ... I don t think point (2) is accurate. During the four years that the Alexander Cup was awarded (1950-1953), the Allan Cup was won by Ontario teams (1950:
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 1, 2006
        On 3/1/06, goaliedave <goaliedave@...> wrote:

        > Interestingly, it is also mentioned that this is" ... in the hope of
        > reviving the rivalry of east and west that was demonstrated in they heyday
        > of the Allan and Memorial Cup playdowns."
        >
        > "This action by the highly-ranked QSHL brings to an end the Major Series
        > Playoff in which the Quebec league opposes the winners of the Maritime Major
        > Hockey League for the Canadian championship."
        >
        > I will continue to research and document (if no one else has don it) the
        > Alexander Cup stuff.
        >
        > This info seems to indicate that: (1) the Alexander Cup was the eastern
        > Canadian senior amateur hockey championship (2) The Allan Cup was a lesser
        > regarded, western championship at this point.


        I don't think point (2) is accurate. During the four years that the
        Alexander Cup was awarded (1950-1953), the Allan Cup was won by Ontario
        teams (1950: Toronto, 1951: Owen Sound, 1952: Fort Frances, 1953:
        Kitchener-Waterloo).

        It may be that the Quebec and Maritime teams moved up from Senior A to Major
        Senior when the Alexander Cup was set up. The Allan Cup may have been
        lesser-regarded at the time in Quebec, but it's an open question as to how
        it was regarded in the rest of the country, where the Senior leagues don't
        appear to have moved up to Major.
        John

        --
        John Edwards
        I used to put quotes here.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • charles roth
        Here s a western Canadian review on the Alexander Cup. The CAHA inagurated the Viscount Alexander Cup to help give the smaller centers in Canada a chance for
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 1, 2006
          Here's a western Canadian review on the Alexander Cup.

          The CAHA inagurated the Viscount Alexander Cup to help give the smaller centers in Canada a chance for national recognition (fostering the game at all levels). This was in response to the monopoly the bigger cities were gathering at the Allan Cup level. The smaller centers weren't able to offer salaries and other compensations (jobs) that the big cities were offering and the larger cities were beginning to show a trend of sending their teams to the finals each year. The best players, who had graced the lineups of the smaller centers in previous seasons in the 1930s and 1940s, were now being lured to the cities in an almost unfair talent recruiting practice. The CAHA may have feared this continued practice would ruin hockey in the smaller centers. The CAHA then drew from its largest cities, which were generating the largest amounts of gate receipts in the Allan Cup playdowns, for the 1950-51 playoffs (and money for their teams and leagues). The leagues included:

          Western Canada Major Senior Hockey League: Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Saskatoon
          Ontario Major Senior Hockey Association: Toronto St.Michael Monarchs, Toronto Marlboros, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton
          Quebec Major Senior Hockey League: Valleyfield, Quebec City, Montreal, Ottawa, Shawinigan Falls, Sherbrooke, Chicoutimi
          Maritime Major Senior Hockey League: Charlottetown, Moncton, Halifax, Saint John
          Cape Breton Major Senior Hockey League: Sydney, North Sydney, Glace Bay

          1) A round robin elminiation playoff was developed for the 1950-51 WCMHL playdowns, Saskatoon winning
          2) The other leagues used the regular playoff elminiation formats to declare their champions.
          3) MMHL met the CBMHL in the quarterfinal, Sydney defeating Charlottetown
          4) WCMHL met in one semi-final, Toronto St.Michaels defeating Saskatoon
          5) QMHL drew the bye to the other semi-final. In this semi-final Valleyfield defeated Sydney
          6) Valleyfield defeated Toronto St.Michaels in the 1950-51 Alexander Cup final

          1951-52
          The level of these five leagues was on a par with many of the minor pro leagues operating in the U.S. The OMHA opted to return to the Allan Cup level for 1951-52; the WCMHL decided to take the pro route and joined the PCHL, forerunner of the old minor pro WHL. This left three leagues vying for the Alexander Cup, and the Cup would finish its short life in the eastern Canada ranks, without competition from across the nation.

          1) The 1950-51 MMHL and CBMHL realigned to form a bigger MMHL for 1951-52: Saint John, Charlottetown, Sydney, Halifax, Moncton, Glace Bay
          2) With only two leagues remaining, the Alexander Cup playdowns were decidedly shorter. Here Quebec City defeated Saint John in the 1951-52 final.

          1952-53
          As mentioned, the QMHL left the CAHA jurisdiction on March 9, 1953 and were elminated from Alexander Cup play as a result. Charlottetown defeated Halifax for the 1952-53 Alexander Cup.

          1953-54
          The Maritime Major shrunk to four clubs in 1953-54 and were the only remaining Major Senior league left in the nation: Sydney, Halifax, Glace Bay, Charlottetown. Halifax defeated Sydney in the last Alexander Cup series. The CAHA scrapped the Cup and series because the original intent was for teams to playoff from across the nation (which was no longer possible with the loss of two of the leagues: the WCMHL and OMHA, plus the suspension of the QMHL).

          Allan Cup
          Looking at the Allan Cup: nothing changed. All the CAHA branches continued to send their league champions on the long playoff road during these years and well into the 1960s. If you notice the championship list, notice their population base size of the champions. They're noteably smaller--just as the CAHA had intended. However, the fan base the CAHA had enjoyed in the late 1940s at the Allan Cup level (with gate receipts and attendances well into thousands per game, levels any minor pro league would like) was gone with the major seniors, and some of the luster of the Allan Cup finals was lost because the CAHA had formed the Alexander Cup competition. But this did help maintain and develop hockey in the smaller centers.

          So in review and attempting to compare the amateur levels or categories of the CAHA (established in 1984) to the early 1950s CAHA hockey, the Alexander Cup might fit in like this (mens hockey for ages above the junior age level):

          AAAA-Alexander Cup
          AAA-Allan Cup
          AA-Intermediate A
          A-Intermediate B


          Charlie in Spokane


          -----Original Message-----
          >From: goaliedave <goaliedave@...>
          >Sent: Mar 1, 2006 6:24 AM
          >To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [hockhist] Alexander Cup
          >
          >Hi all,
          >
          >I did a quick look into the Alexander Cup questions. I dropped in at the HHOF (Kevin Shea) and the National Archives in Ottawa. There isn't much put together on this although next week I'm going to contact the SIHR folks ... someone there must have something.
          >
          >At the Archives I got lucky with my first microfilm pick, March 1953 Montreal Gazette .The sports news on page 25 March 2 laid out the status which I can summarize as follows:
          >
          >It seems there were a few things happening at once. First of course the NHL Habs were trying to turn the QSHL pro so they could have Beliveau.
          >
          >Also, the Quebec branch (QAHA) had been suspended by the CAHA for allowing a suspended player to play, and they had until March 10 to determine whether they would appeal or leave the CAHA.
          >
          >Finally and as a direct result of the suspension by CAHA , the QSHL voted 'last night' to start negotiations with the Western (WHL) or American leagues (AHL) , both professional circuits, for a spring playoff series.
          >
          >Interestingly, it is also mentioned that this is" ... in the hope of reviving the rivalry of east and west that was demonstrated in they heyday of the Allan and Memorial Cup playdowns."
          >
          >"This action by the highly-ranked QSHL brings to an end the Major Series Playoff in which the Quebec league opposes the winners of the Maritime Major Hockey League for the Canadian championship."
          >
          >I will continue to research and document (if no one else has don it) the Alexander Cup stuff.
          >
          >This info seems to indicate that: (1) the Alexander Cup was the eastern Canadian senior amateur hockey championship (2) The Allan Cup was a lesser regarded, western championship at this point.
          >
          >All to say, if the new maritime senior hockey league has reclaimed the Alexander Cup to award this year, it appears they do have the pedigree to back up their right.
          >
          >Dave in Whitby
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • goaliedave
          Charles, Thank you very much! I shall be in touch to follow up. Your facts support Beliveau s notion that his Alexander Cup win was for the Eastern Canadian
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 1, 2006
            Charles,

            Thank you very much! I shall be in touch to follow up. Your facts
            support Beliveau's notion that his Alexander Cup win was for the "Eastern
            Canadian" Senior championship. Also Kevin at the HHOF had some notes about
            the Alexander Cup being 'above' the Allan Cup for a short time so that seems
            to be consistent with what you have. Interestingly, the Cup competition was
            stopped because there was only the Maritime league left... yet it is being
            "re-born" as the same championship of the Maritime league!

            Charles, I would encourage you to offer your research (or an article)
            on the Alexander Cup to the SIHR folks who put together the "Backcheck"
            online hockey history site for the National Archives. Unless I am blind,
            there is nothing there on the Alexander Cup.

            In honour of your answering my question I offer here an article from
            the "Backcheck" site... about your Spokane team winning the Allan Cyp.

            Dave in Whitby




            The Toronto Star. -- (May 6, 1970). -- P.81




            SPOKANE, Wash. (CP) -- Spokane Jets fans streamed shoulder-to-shoulder
            onto the ice last night with a roof-rattling chant of "We're No. 1, we're
            No. 1." Jets had just become the first United States team to win in 62 years
            of play for the Allan Cup, emblematic of Canadian senior hockey supremacy.

            Jets, with great goaltending from Seth Martin, tripped Orillia
            Terriers, 6-3, in the sixth game yesterday before a howling crowd of 6,278.

            Coach Al Rollins, clutching his third Allan Cup -- he was on two
            winning teams as a goalie -- headed for a celebration. Losing coach Ike
            Hildebrand and his crew headed for the airport and home.

            All six games were played here. Jets won the opener, 5-2; the second,
            5-0; lost the next two, 5-2 and 6-2; then took a 3-2 hold on the
            best-of-seven series with a 2-1 win Sunday.

            Martin was a standout -- almost matched by Gerry McNamara, the Toronto
            insurance man in the Orillia nets.

            Terriers built up a 2-0 lead by 7:07 of the second period, but Jets
            tied it in the period and lead 5-2 midway through the third, later adding an
            empty-net goal.

            Tom Rendall scored twice for Jets, other scores coming from Buddy
            Bodman, John Thompson, Dave Toner and Gord Turlik. Toner got the winner on a
            fine pass from Gail Holden.

            Gary Millroy, Clare Alexander and Al Osborne scored for Orillia, the
            rags-to-riches team which defeated Victoriaville, Que., Tigers in the
            Eastern Canada final.

            Spokane, the Western International League team that defeated St.
            Boniface, Man., in the western final, was in the Allan Cup finals in 1957
            but bowed to Whitby.

            Bodman was with Jets that year and so was Tom Hodges, now team
            captain, who had an assist on Rendall's second goal. Rollins was with two
            champion teams, Edmonton in 1948 and Drumheller, Alta., in 1965.

            Some players on the Spokane team have taken out U.S. citizenship but
            all came here from Canada. In Rollins' three years here, they've won three
            WIHL titles, three playoff crowns and now the Allan Cup.

            The Ontario crew rose through intermediate ranks before entering
            senior hockey four years ago, then fought their way up from the cellar to
            the title.

            Martin, who was with Trail., B.C., Smoke Eaters when they won the 1962
            Allan Cup, and again when they lost to Chatham in the 1961 final, stopped 41
            drives. McNamara handled 27.





            Message: 18
            Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2006 14:18:35 -0500 (EST)
            From: charles roth <charlesroth@...>
            Subject: Re: Alexander Cup

            Here's a western Canadian review on the Alexander Cup.

            The CAHA inagurated the Viscount Alexander Cup to help give the smaller
            centers in Canada a chance for national recognition (fostering the game at
            all levels). This was in response to the monopoly the bigger cities were
            gathering at the Allan Cup level. The smaller centers weren't able to offer
            salaries and other compensations (jobs) that the big cities were offering
            and the larger cities were beginning to show a trend of sending their teams
            to the finals each year. The best players, who had graced the lineups of the
            smaller centers in previous seasons in the 1930s and 1940s, were now being
            lured to the cities in an almost unfair talent recruiting practice. The CAHA
            may have feared this continued practice would ruin hockey in the smaller
            centers. The CAHA then drew from its largest cities, which were generating
            the largest amounts of gate receipts in the Allan Cup playdowns, for the
            1950-51 playoffs (and money for their teams and leagues). The leagues
            included:

            Western Canada Major Senior Hockey League: Calgary, Edmonton, Regina,
            Saskatoon
            Ontario Major Senior Hockey Association: Toronto St.Michael Monarchs,
            Toronto Marlboros, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton
            Quebec Major Senior Hockey League: Valleyfield, Quebec City, Montreal,
            Ottawa, Shawinigan Falls, Sherbrooke, Chicoutimi
            Maritime Major Senior Hockey League: Charlottetown, Moncton, Halifax, Saint
            John
            Cape Breton Major Senior Hockey League: Sydney, North Sydney, Glace Bay

            1) A round robin elminiation playoff was developed for the 1950-51 WCMHL
            playdowns, Saskatoon winning
            2) The other leagues used the regular playoff elminiation formats to declare
            their champions.
            3) MMHL met the CBMHL in the quarterfinal, Sydney defeating Charlottetown
            4) WCMHL met in one semi-final, Toronto St.Michaels defeating Saskatoon
            5) QMHL drew the bye to the other semi-final. In this semi-final Valleyfield
            defeated Sydney
            6) Valleyfield defeated Toronto St.Michaels in the 1950-51 Alexander Cup
            final

            1951-52
            The level of these five leagues was on a par with many of the minor pro
            leagues operating in the U.S. The OMHA opted to return to the Allan Cup
            level for 1951-52; the WCMHL decided to take the pro route and joined the
            PCHL, forerunner of the old minor pro WHL. This left three leagues vying for
            the Alexander Cup, and the Cup would finish its short life in the eastern
            Canada ranks, without competition from across the nation.

            1) The 1950-51 MMHL and CBMHL realigned to form a bigger MMHL for 1951-52:
            Saint John, Charlottetown, Sydney, Halifax, Moncton, Glace Bay
            2) With only two leagues remaining, the Alexander Cup playdowns were
            decidedly shorter. Here Quebec City defeated Saint John in the 1951-52
            final.

            1952-53
            As mentioned, the QMHL left the CAHA jurisdiction on March 9, 1953 and were
            elminated from Alexander Cup play as a result. Charlottetown defeated
            Halifax for the 1952-53 Alexander Cup.

            1953-54
            The Maritime Major shrunk to four clubs in 1953-54 and were the only
            remaining Major Senior league left in the nation: Sydney, Halifax, Glace
            Bay, Charlottetown. Halifax defeated Sydney in the last Alexander Cup
            series. The CAHA scrapped the Cup and series because the original intent was
            for teams to playoff from across the nation (which was no longer possible
            with the loss of two of the leagues: the WCMHL and OMHA, plus the suspension
            of the QMHL).

            Allan Cup
            Looking at the Allan Cup: nothing changed. All the CAHA branches continued
            to send their league champions on the long playoff road during these years
            and well into the 1960s. If you notice the championship list, notice their
            population base size of the champions. They're noteably smaller--just as the
            CAHA had intended. However, the fan base the CAHA had enjoyed in the late
            1940s at the Allan Cup level (with gate receipts and attendances well into
            thousands per game, levels any minor pro league would like) was gone with
            the major seniors, and some of the luster of the Allan Cup finals was lost
            because the CAHA had formed the Alexander Cup competition. But this did help
            maintain and develop hockey in the smaller centers.

            So in review and attempting to compare the amateur levels or categories of
            the CAHA (established in 1984) to the early 1950s CAHA hockey, the Alexander
            Cup might fit in like this (mens hockey for ages above the junior age
            level):

            AAAA-Alexander Cup
            AAA-Allan Cup
            AA-Intermediate A
            A-Intermediate B


            Charlie in Spokane


            -----Original Message-----
            >From: goaliedave <goaliedave@...>
            >Sent: Mar 1, 2006 6:24 AM
            >To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [hockhist] Alexander Cup
            >
            >Hi all,
            >
            >I did a quick look into the Alexander Cup questions. I dropped in at the
            >HHOF (Kevin Shea) and the National Archives in Ottawa. There isn't much put
            >together on this although next week I'm going to contact the SIHR folks ...
            >someone there must have something.
            >
            >At the Archives I got lucky with my first microfilm pick, March 1953
            >Montreal Gazette .The sports news on page 25 March 2 laid out the status
            >which I can summarize as follows:
            >
            >It seems there were a few things happening at once. First of course the NHL
            >Habs were trying to turn the QSHL pro so they could have Beliveau.
            >
            >Also, the Quebec branch (QAHA) had been suspended by the CAHA for allowing
            >a suspended player to play, and they had until March 10 to determine
            >whether they would appeal or leave the CAHA.
            >
            >Finally and as a direct result of the suspension by CAHA , the QSHL voted
            >'last night' to start negotiations with the Western (WHL) or American
            >leagues (AHL) , both professional circuits, for a spring playoff series.
            >
            >Interestingly, it is also mentioned that this is" ... in the hope of
            >reviving the rivalry of east and west that was demonstrated in they heyday
            >of the Allan and Memorial Cup playdowns."
            >
            >"This action by the highly-ranked QSHL brings to an end the Major Series
            >Playoff in which the Quebec league opposes the winners of the Maritime
            >Major Hockey League for the Canadian championship."
            >
            >I will continue to research and document (if no one else has don it) the
            >Alexander Cup stuff.
            >
            >This info seems to indicate that: (1) the Alexander Cup was the eastern
            >Canadian senior amateur hockey championship (2) The Allan Cup was a lesser
            >regarded, western championship at this point.
            >
            >All to say, if the new maritime senior hockey league has reclaimed the
            >Alexander Cup to award this year, it appears they do have the pedigree to
            >back up their right.
            >
            >Dave in Whitby


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • andreleves2000
            Hi, I m looking for infos about the Alexander Cup. The Quebec Aces won that cup in 1952. Thanks for any piece of info. Merci.
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 11, 2006
              Hi,
              I'm looking for infos about the Alexander Cup. The Quebec Aces won
              that cup in 1952. Thanks for any piece of info. Merci.
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