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Re: Death of Hamilton Tigers / Birth of NY Americans

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  • stevenmcohen
    (apologies for the duplicate emails). Deceptions and Doublecross sits in a prominent place on my desk, and I was just looking through it. Your chapter, Stop
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 7, 2005
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      (apologies for the duplicate emails).

      Deceptions and Doublecross sits in a prominent place on my desk, and
      I was just looking through it. Your chapter, "Stop Spreading The
      News" has been an enormous help. But, the issue remains somewhat
      murky. You note that Rickard (with John Hammond, Chairman of Madison
      Square Gardeon) obtained an NHL Franchise. The franchise was
      then "flipped" to Dwyer, who paid $75,000 for the Hamilton Club.
      {Note: Why did Dwyer need the "franchise" when he went out and
      bought the Tigers?} But you also provide a photo -- a really great
      photo -- of Rickard in Americans Sweater and wearing skates with a
      caption that suggests he's the owner. Elsewhere, there is also a
      reference to his "ownership" of the club. New York Times coverage of
      the day seems to report again and again that Rickard is the owner.
      Then, suddenly, after the advent of the Rangers (truly Rickard's
      club), the NYTimes starts mentioning Dwyer. This, of course, helps
      to explain your comment that the papers of the day mistakenly
      reported that Rickard was the owner -- when in truth it was Dwyer.
      All of this leads to my confusion . . . .

      While I've got the floor, I might as well throw out another related
      issue or two. By any chance does anyone have a line on what happened
      during the 2 years Dwyer spent in jail. He was convicted of
      bootlegging by the US Attorney in Manhattan in 1926. Dwyer was out
      of jail by 1929-30. Although the contemporaneous press reports note
      that Dwyer was a bootlegger and track owner, not a word is mentioned
      of his ownership of the Americans. And I can find nothing explaining
      whether he continued to own and operate the team while cooling his
      heals in federal custody.

      Also, I know Dwyer lost the team when he was forced into Bankruptcy
      due to some back tax issues. I realize that Red Dutton (former
      Americans player turned coach) was installed as one of the principles
      of the new NHL sponsored corporation that assumed control of the
      team. But, at some point, the league's interest in the team is
      eliminated and, i gather, Dutton becomes the controlling principle as
      well as manager. I cannot seem to find any information on whether
      Dutton was required to pay the NHL or whether he was given the team
      gratis (a strange concept).

      Finally, I find it curious -- but I guess confirmation of Deception
      and Doublecross's central tenet -- that Dwyer a convicted bootlegger
      and tax evader is permitted to continue his ownership of the
      Americans and even given a spot of on the NHL's Bd of Governors. It's
      not until he defaults on his financial obligation to the league that
      he apparently loses control of the team.

      Thanks for any help.

      Steve Cohen
      Brooklyn, New York



      --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "nieforth" <nieforth@y...> wrote:
      > Have you looked at the book Morey Holzman and I wrote, Deceptions
      and
      > Doublecross: How the NHL Conquered Hockey? There is a good amount
      on
      > the Tigers and their sale in the book.
      >
      > There is also a book due in the fall on the Hamilton Tigers' NHL
      run.
      > I'll have to look up the author & publisher.
      >
      > Joseph Nieforth
    • brian_moore_67
      In his book When The Rangers Were Young, Frank Boucher has it that Tom Duggan was given the rights to 3 teams. He sold one to Charles Adams in Boston and one
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 8, 2005
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        In his book When The Rangers Were Young, Frank Boucher has it that Tom
        Duggan was given the rights to 3 teams. He sold one to Charles Adams
        in Boston and one to Bill Dwyer in NY. Dwyer didn't have any players,
        so Hammond arranged for the Gardens to buy the Hamilton players rights
        for $80,000 and allowed the Americans to play in the Gardens, on the
        condition that he could buy the third team from Duggan if they wanted
        to put their own team in the Gardens. Dwyer didn't read the contract
        Duggan wrote up and "was tunderstruck when he found there was going to
        be another New York team." It says Hammond was honorary president of
        the Americans and Dwyer was the owner.

        Brian Moore
        Aylesford, Nova Scotia

        --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "stevenmcohen" <stevenmcohen@y...> wrote:
        You note that Rickard (with John Hammond, Chairman of Madison
        > Square Gardeon) obtained an NHL Franchise. The franchise was
        > then "flipped" to Dwyer, who paid $75,000 for the Hamilton Club.
        > {Note: Why did Dwyer need the "franchise" when he went out and
        > bought the Tigers?}
        > Thanks for any help.
        >
        > Steve Cohen
        > Brooklyn, New York
      • Morey Holzman
        Hi Steven, Maybe I ll jump in here... ... and ... Madison ... great ... of ... owner. ... helps ... Dwyer. ... The best research I can find is that Rickard was
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 8, 2005
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          Hi Steven,

          Maybe I'll jump in here...



          --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "stevenmcohen" <stevenmcohen@y...>
          wrote:
          > (apologies for the duplicate emails).
          >
          > Deceptions and Doublecross sits in a prominent place on my desk,
          and
          > I was just looking through it. Your chapter, "Stop Spreading The
          > News" has been an enormous help. But, the issue remains somewhat
          > murky. You note that Rickard (with John Hammond, Chairman of
          Madison
          > Square Gardeon) obtained an NHL Franchise. The franchise was
          > then "flipped" to Dwyer, who paid $75,000 for the Hamilton Club.
          > {Note: Why did Dwyer need the "franchise" when he went out and
          > bought the Tigers?} But you also provide a photo -- a really
          great
          > photo -- of Rickard in Americans Sweater and wearing skates with a
          > caption that suggests he's the owner. Elsewhere, there is also a
          > reference to his "ownership" of the club. New York Times coverage
          of
          > the day seems to report again and again that Rickard is the
          owner.
          > Then, suddenly, after the advent of the Rangers (truly Rickard's
          > club), the NYTimes starts mentioning Dwyer. This, of course,
          helps
          > to explain your comment that the papers of the day mistakenly
          > reported that Rickard was the owner -- when in truth it was
          Dwyer.
          > All of this leads to my confusion . . . .

          The best research I can find is that Rickard was convinced by Tommy
          Gorman to put a hockey tenant in his fabulous new Madison Square
          Garden. I actually called the NY Rangers to get any information
          they might have on Rickard or Hammond, and they had not even a word!

          The financing of pro sports was very complicated in those days, as
          opposed to the single-owner structure that became prevalent in the
          30s and forward. Think Edmonton Oilers and their 38 owners, or the
          Calgary Flames and their group of 8, and you'd be on the right
          track. However, the arenas usually owned a percentage of the team -
          this is what forced the teams to stay put. The ECHA actually broke
          up over one franchise transferring his club to a smaller rink in
          Montreal.

          The NHL had exactly one employee when the NY Americans came into
          being - President Frank Calder, who was based in Montreal. He may
          have never even met Dwyer when Dwyer became Americans owner. The
          check cleared, so to speak, and that was good enough for the NHL.

          Rickard did not own 100% of the Amerks. When he applied for an NHL
          franchise in 1926, he did so because he wanted 100% of the revenue.
          Rickard's assocaites, by the way, were from the boxing arenas.
          Frederic McLaughlin, owner of the Black Hawks, knew Rickard from
          their time in South America. Charles Hughes, the original Detroit
          owner, was a boxing arena operator. Benny Leonard, in Pittsburgh,
          was a prize fighter from New York.
          >
          > While I've got the floor, I might as well throw out another
          related
          > issue or two. By any chance does anyone have a line on what
          happened
          > during the 2 years Dwyer spent in jail. He was convicted of
          > bootlegging by the US Attorney in Manhattan in 1926. Dwyer was
          out
          > of jail by 1929-30. Although the contemporaneous press reports
          note
          > that Dwyer was a bootlegger and track owner, not a word is
          mentioned
          > of his ownership of the Americans. And I can find nothing
          explaining
          > whether he continued to own and operate the team while cooling his
          > heals in federal custody.

          Dwyer lost his team in the mid-30s. The NHL took over the
          franchise, and Dutton took over the operations. At the time of the
          closing of the Brooklyn Americans, the NHL still owned the
          franchise. That's why Dutton became embittered - he put his heart
          and soul into the team, but not his money (Amerks went for a
          combination of a youth movement and NHL's equivalent of senior
          citizens - killed the club in the 40s when the Amerks had only four
          players on its roster due to retirements and war-time
          enlistmnents). Dutton was granted a seat on the Board of Governors
          during 42-43, and when Calder died, Dutton gave up his seat to
          become temporary NHL President (just like Bud Selig was temporary
          baseball commissioner). When Dutton became president, he lost his
          seat on the Bd of Governors. Then the board voted out the Amerks
          and held a draft. I believe this was in Sept 43.

          >
          > Also, I know Dwyer lost the team when he was forced into
          Bankruptcy
          > due to some back tax issues. I realize that Red Dutton (former
          > Americans player turned coach) was installed as one of the
          principles
          > of the new NHL sponsored corporation that assumed control of the
          > team. But, at some point, the league's interest in the team is
          > eliminated and, i gather, Dutton becomes the controlling principle
          as
          > well as manager. I cannot seem to find any information on whether
          > Dutton was required to pay the NHL or whether he was given the
          team
          > gratis (a strange concept).
          >
          > Finally, I find it curious -- but I guess confirmation of
          Deception
          > and Doublecross's central tenet -- that Dwyer a convicted
          bootlegger
          > and tax evader is permitted to continue his ownership of the
          > Americans and even given a spot of on the NHL's Bd of Governors.
          It's
          > not until he defaults on his financial obligation to the league
          that
          > he apparently loses control of the team.

          So was Harold Ballard during the 70s. For that matter, so was
          George Steinbrenner for baseball. If you look at the owners of
          hockey in that era, they were either hands-off (like Rickard,
          Hammond) or they were atrocious, or somewhere in the middle.
          Frederic McLaughlin may have been the worst owner in the history of
          pro sports. The Black Hawks debut was the very first hockey game he
          had ever seen, and he was already telling Coach Pete Muldoon how the
          team should be trained and the strategy that should have been used.
          Muldoon at that time, had been involved in coach pro hockey for 13
          years and had a Stanley Cup to his credit. (Muldoon was also a
          great amateur boxer, but gave it up in the early 1910s.)

          The NHL was hands off regarding the Americans and let Dutton do what
          he pleased with the franchise. The team was expected to pay for
          itself.

          Hope this helps. For more on Deceptions, you might wish to sign up
          on our Yahoo Groups site and go through the archives. Joseph posted
          some fabuslous stuff on the Ottawa ownership situation there.

          Morey Holzman
        • Lloyd Davis
          Morey and Joe, this is your editor checking in. On page 268 of Deceptions it says, In New York, the Americans were an off-Broadway hit, which prompted Tex
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 8, 2005
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            Morey and Joe, this is your editor checking in.

            On page 268 of Deceptions it says, "In New York, the Americans were an
            off-Broadway hit, which prompted Tex Rickard to take a second look at the
            sport and decide that he wanted a team of his own. (Despite contemporary
            newspaper accounts to the contrary, Rickard did not own the Americans -- it
            was the bootlegger Bill Dwyer who paid the bills, including rent to the
            Madison Square Garden Corporation.)"

            Steven Cohen is going by the "contemporary newspaper accounts," which
            repeatedly refer to "Rickard's Americans" and "Rickard's New York Hockey
            Club".

            I don't want to speak for him, but it would seem the question is, where's
            the evidence that the Times' accounts are to be taken with a grain of salt?

            I've noticed that, after New Year's 1926, Rickard's name stops appearing in
            the lead paragraphs of game accounts. The team becomes either "the
            Americans" or "the New York Hockey Club."

            Whether this is because the team is sufficiently established that it doesn't
            need to be linked with the highly visible Rickard, or because Rickard wanted
            the connection downplayed, is an open question.

            Could it be the latter? We also see that, in January 1926, Rickard and
            Hammond have apparently applied for a Brooklyn franchise (NYT, Jan. 17,
            1926, p. S2, "Canadians Oppose Syndicate Hockey"). The second paragraph
            reads, "There has been considerable comment in the Canadian papers during
            the pas week about the proposition, which they regard as a movement to
            establish so-called "syndicate" hockey in the organization.

            That's an interesting charge, because as you note on page 133, the eastern
            Canadian press used to allege that the Patricks' PCHA was "syndicate
            hockey." Of course, by the '50s the eastern Canadian hockey-writing
            establishment would have experienced some turnover, so the NHL was not
            accused of being "syndicate hockey," even though the Norrises were in
            business with the mob. But I digress.

            On February 14, 1926 (page S3, "Hockey Officials Will Meet Today"), the
            Times picks up on the "syndicate hockey" charge again. "The expansion of the
            National Hockey League will come before a meeting of the organization which
            is being held today at the King Edward Hotel in Toronto. [Seventy-five years
            later, Deceptions would begin to assume its published form in the bar of
            that very hotel.] Among the applications for franchises will be one from
            Colonel John S. Hammond and Tex Rickard of Madison Square Garden...

            "The interests of the Garden and the New York Americans are, according to
            the Canadian members of the league, so closely allied that the men across
            the border object to it because of the dangers of so-called 'syndicate
            hockey.'

            "Some time ago Colonel Hammond made application for another team here and
            the league laid the matter on the table for future consideration. The
            decision will be made today....

            "Colonel Hammond recently resigned as President of the New York Hockey Club
            to give up all his time toward the organization of a second club here."

            A month later, the Chicago Tribune ("Paddy Forgot to Order Bricks for
            Stadium, Rickard Asserts," March 26, 1926, page 25) quotes Rickard on plans
            for his own Chicago arena. The story was not written by a Trib reporter, but
            came via the Tribune Press Service.

            "Mr. Paddy Harmon, who once had a dream of a sixteen billion dollar stadium
            in Chicago, capable of seating the entire populations of New York,
            Pennsylvania and the Fourth precinct of Quincy, Ill., has fallen out of bed
            and awakened, according to Mr. Tex Rickard, who recently went to Chicago to
            feel Mr. Harmon's pulse.

            "'I'll tell you about my own stadium in Chicago in a few days,' Rickard said
            this evening.... 'I can build stadiums bigger than [Harmon's] any old day if
            I'm going to build them out of conversation. He never had any intention of
            buying a lot of brick and nails and hinges and all those things...'

            "He says indoor ice hockey, a sanguinary sport, combining the goriest
            elements of the prize fighting and bull fighting professions, will be the
            principal reliance of the Chicago stadium. However, in order to escape the
            appearance of **syndicate hockey**, Rickard must make arrangements to place
            the Chicago franchise in the hands of Chicago holders. **He does not own the
            present New York hockey team,** but he owns the franchise for a second team,
            which will be started next year.

            "'We're going to get some of those Chicago fellows to take up the Chicago
            franchise,' Tex said this evening. 'Har, har, har!' said Mr. Rickard in
            conclusion."

            I'll take an educated guess and say that this story must have come to the
            Trib via the New York Daily News -- Robert McCormick, publisher of the
            Tribune, and Joseph Medill Patterson of the News were related (as was Cissy
            Patterson, owner of the Washington Times-Herald).





            I can't find a Times article that links Dwyer with the Americans until 1928,
            when his legal battles are done.


            on 8/8/05 11:38 AM, Morey Holzman at epenaltybox@... wrote:

            > Rickard did not own 100% of the Amerks. When he applied for an NHL
            > franchise in 1926, he did so because he wanted 100% of the revenue.

            --
            Lloyd Davis Communications
            304-115 Danforth Ave., Toronto, ON M4K 1N2
            416 465 6999 /// 416 462 0230 (fax)
            ldavis@...
          • stevenmcohen
            Thanks for the assistance. All very useful. Steve ... a ... coverage ... revenue. ... his ... principle ... whether ... he ... the ... used. ... what ...
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 8, 2005
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              Thanks for the assistance. All very useful.

              Steve

              --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Morey Holzman" <epenaltybox@y...>
              wrote:
              > Hi Steven,
              >
              > Maybe I'll jump in here...
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "stevenmcohen" <stevenmcohen@y...>
              > wrote:
              > > (apologies for the duplicate emails).
              > >
              > > Deceptions and Doublecross sits in a prominent place on my desk,
              > and
              > > I was just looking through it. Your chapter, "Stop Spreading The
              > > News" has been an enormous help. But, the issue remains somewhat
              > > murky. You note that Rickard (with John Hammond, Chairman of
              > Madison
              > > Square Gardeon) obtained an NHL Franchise. The franchise was
              > > then "flipped" to Dwyer, who paid $75,000 for the Hamilton Club.
              > > {Note: Why did Dwyer need the "franchise" when he went out and
              > > bought the Tigers?} But you also provide a photo -- a really
              > great
              > > photo -- of Rickard in Americans Sweater and wearing skates with
              a
              > > caption that suggests he's the owner. Elsewhere, there is also a
              > > reference to his "ownership" of the club. New York Times
              coverage
              > of
              > > the day seems to report again and again that Rickard is the
              > owner.
              > > Then, suddenly, after the advent of the Rangers (truly Rickard's
              > > club), the NYTimes starts mentioning Dwyer. This, of course,
              > helps
              > > to explain your comment that the papers of the day mistakenly
              > > reported that Rickard was the owner -- when in truth it was
              > Dwyer.
              > > All of this leads to my confusion . . . .
              >
              > The best research I can find is that Rickard was convinced by Tommy
              > Gorman to put a hockey tenant in his fabulous new Madison Square
              > Garden. I actually called the NY Rangers to get any information
              > they might have on Rickard or Hammond, and they had not even a word!
              >
              > The financing of pro sports was very complicated in those days, as
              > opposed to the single-owner structure that became prevalent in the
              > 30s and forward. Think Edmonton Oilers and their 38 owners, or the
              > Calgary Flames and their group of 8, and you'd be on the right
              > track. However, the arenas usually owned a percentage of the team -

              > this is what forced the teams to stay put. The ECHA actually broke
              > up over one franchise transferring his club to a smaller rink in
              > Montreal.
              >
              > The NHL had exactly one employee when the NY Americans came into
              > being - President Frank Calder, who was based in Montreal. He may
              > have never even met Dwyer when Dwyer became Americans owner. The
              > check cleared, so to speak, and that was good enough for the NHL.
              >
              > Rickard did not own 100% of the Amerks. When he applied for an NHL
              > franchise in 1926, he did so because he wanted 100% of the
              revenue.
              > Rickard's assocaites, by the way, were from the boxing arenas.
              > Frederic McLaughlin, owner of the Black Hawks, knew Rickard from
              > their time in South America. Charles Hughes, the original Detroit
              > owner, was a boxing arena operator. Benny Leonard, in Pittsburgh,
              > was a prize fighter from New York.
              > >
              > > While I've got the floor, I might as well throw out another
              > related
              > > issue or two. By any chance does anyone have a line on what
              > happened
              > > during the 2 years Dwyer spent in jail. He was convicted of
              > > bootlegging by the US Attorney in Manhattan in 1926. Dwyer was
              > out
              > > of jail by 1929-30. Although the contemporaneous press reports
              > note
              > > that Dwyer was a bootlegger and track owner, not a word is
              > mentioned
              > > of his ownership of the Americans. And I can find nothing
              > explaining
              > > whether he continued to own and operate the team while cooling
              his
              > > heals in federal custody.
              >
              > Dwyer lost his team in the mid-30s. The NHL took over the
              > franchise, and Dutton took over the operations. At the time of the
              > closing of the Brooklyn Americans, the NHL still owned the
              > franchise. That's why Dutton became embittered - he put his heart
              > and soul into the team, but not his money (Amerks went for a
              > combination of a youth movement and NHL's equivalent of senior
              > citizens - killed the club in the 40s when the Amerks had only four
              > players on its roster due to retirements and war-time
              > enlistmnents). Dutton was granted a seat on the Board of Governors
              > during 42-43, and when Calder died, Dutton gave up his seat to
              > become temporary NHL President (just like Bud Selig was temporary
              > baseball commissioner). When Dutton became president, he lost his
              > seat on the Bd of Governors. Then the board voted out the Amerks
              > and held a draft. I believe this was in Sept 43.
              >
              > >
              > > Also, I know Dwyer lost the team when he was forced into
              > Bankruptcy
              > > due to some back tax issues. I realize that Red Dutton (former
              > > Americans player turned coach) was installed as one of the
              > principles
              > > of the new NHL sponsored corporation that assumed control of the
              > > team. But, at some point, the league's interest in the team is
              > > eliminated and, i gather, Dutton becomes the controlling
              principle
              > as
              > > well as manager. I cannot seem to find any information on
              whether
              > > Dutton was required to pay the NHL or whether he was given the
              > team
              > > gratis (a strange concept).
              > >
              > > Finally, I find it curious -- but I guess confirmation of
              > Deception
              > > and Doublecross's central tenet -- that Dwyer a convicted
              > bootlegger
              > > and tax evader is permitted to continue his ownership of the
              > > Americans and even given a spot of on the NHL's Bd of Governors.
              > It's
              > > not until he defaults on his financial obligation to the league
              > that
              > > he apparently loses control of the team.
              >
              > So was Harold Ballard during the 70s. For that matter, so was
              > George Steinbrenner for baseball. If you look at the owners of
              > hockey in that era, they were either hands-off (like Rickard,
              > Hammond) or they were atrocious, or somewhere in the middle.
              > Frederic McLaughlin may have been the worst owner in the history of
              > pro sports. The Black Hawks debut was the very first hockey game
              he
              > had ever seen, and he was already telling Coach Pete Muldoon how
              the
              > team should be trained and the strategy that should have been
              used.
              > Muldoon at that time, had been involved in coach pro hockey for 13
              > years and had a Stanley Cup to his credit. (Muldoon was also a
              > great amateur boxer, but gave it up in the early 1910s.)
              >
              > The NHL was hands off regarding the Americans and let Dutton do
              what
              > he pleased with the franchise. The team was expected to pay for
              > itself.
              >
              > Hope this helps. For more on Deceptions, you might wish to sign up
              > on our Yahoo Groups site and go through the archives. Joseph
              posted
              > some fabuslous stuff on the Ottawa ownership situation there.
              >
              > Morey Holzman
            • Lloyd Davis
              Whoops. Sent that last one before it was ready to go, so it probably could have used some editing of its own. (Doctor, heal thyself.) Anyway, what I was
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 8, 2005
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                Whoops. Sent that last one before it was ready to go, so it probably could
                have used some editing of its own. (Doctor, heal thyself.)

                Anyway, what I was driving at is that there remains a question about when
                the franchise passed from Rickard to Dwyer. We have no doubt that Rickard
                held the franchise initially. Indeed, if the Times' record is to believed,
                he was in talks with Duggan before MSG III was built. There even exists a
                story in the Times that Rickard was considering building an ice plant at MSG
                III and moving it to the new Garden (often referred to as "Rickard's Arena"
                for the first several months of its existence).

                And we have no doubt that Dwyer is the owner as of 1928, when he suddenly
                assumes a high profile.

                It seems that Hammond and Rickard are distancing themselves from the
                Americans in the early weeks of 1926 in anticipation of launching the
                Rangers. But the front man and/or new owner hasn't been identified yet.

                So, did you guys ever find the smoking gun?

                The article in the Tribune that I cited suggests that an alternate New York
                newspaper source might provide some fodder for Mr. Cohen.

                The issue here, in my mind, doesn't seem to be the ownership structures of
                sports teams, but the apparent lack of interest in covering the business of
                sports in the 1920s.

                I wonder if there's anything in the MSG corporation's archives that would
                shed light?


                on 8/8/05 11:38 AM, Morey Holzman at epenaltybox@... wrote:

                > Rickard did not own 100% of the Amerks. When he applied for an NHL
                > franchise in 1926, he did so because he wanted 100% of the revenue.

                --
                Lloyd Davis Communications
                304-115 Danforth Ave., Toronto, ON M4K 1N2
                416 465 6999 /// 416 462 0230 (fax)
                ldavis@...
              • Lloyd Davis
                Meanwhile, we also know that Rickard was a rival of Harmon s, and was therefore seeking to ensure that he didn t get an NHL team for Chicago. Rickard was
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 8, 2005
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                  Meanwhile, we also know that Rickard was a rival of Harmon's, and was
                  therefore seeking to ensure that he didn't get an NHL team for Chicago.
                  Rickard was apparently behind Tack Hardwick's application for a Chicago
                  franchise. Caught between Harmon's delayed arena plans, widely being
                  dismissed as the '20s equivalent of vapourware (the ECHL would've given him
                  a franchise without blinking) and the hint of "syndicate hockey," the league
                  ultimately granted the franchise to neither. (Chicago Tribune, April 19,
                  1926, "Chicago to Get Hockey Club but It'll Take Time," page 21. Again,
                  special to the Trib.)

                  Where it gets really murky is that a "New York lawyer" (so that's where Al
                  Strachan gets the phrase from) by the name of E.L. Gary is identified as
                  representing a Chicago group (see also "Cut Arranged for Visiting Hockey
                  Club," Tribune, April 18, 1926, page A2). In May 1926, Tack Hardwick buys
                  the Portland Rosebuds ("Hardwick Buys Portland, Oregon Hockey Team,"
                  Tribune, May 4, 1926, page 23) "on behalf of Chicago interests." Further
                  down, the report says, "[Frank] Patrick represented Portland, Victoria,
                  Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton. he has not had any connection with the
                  Saskatoon Sheiks. It is understood here that **Eugene Gary, who is
                  associated with Tom Duggan in the New York Americans,** holds an option on
                  this team."

                  Wot the heck?! Now, just the day before, the Trib ran a story headed
                  "Hardwick Likely to Get Chicago N.H.L. Franchise" on page 19.

                  "Chicago and Detroit are almost certain of berths in the National Hockey
                  league, beginning next season. This unexpected announcement was made by
                  President Frank Calder this evening at the conclusion of a week-end of
                  almost continuous sessions.

                  "It appears the road is now open for the inclusion in the circuit next
                  season of a Chicago club headed by Tack Hardwick, former Harvard football
                  star, and a Detroit club under the control of the Bierer interests....

                  "[T]he clubs stood 7 to 1 for the inclusion of these two organizations,
                  bringing the loop to a ten club basis....

                  "Notice of motion was filed and will be dealt with at the meeting called for
                  May 15-16 which seeks to have the clause relating to the 'unanimous' vote
                  amended to require only a two-thirds majority necessary to admit new clubs.
                  This is expected to prevent one club -- in this case, **Tom Duggan's New
                  York Americans** -- from blocking action on new franchises....

                  "[C]alder stated the trouble had been not so much whether or not Chicago and
                  Detroit should be admitted, but was rather which of the four syndicates
                  applying should get the franchises. Yesterday four were for Hardwick and
                  Bierer and the others were for Harmon in Chicago and McCreath interestst in
                  Detroit.

                  "All but Tom Duggan's New York club was won over to the idea of admitting
                  Hardwick in Chicago and Bierer in Detroit this yearr, with the possibility
                  that if the game took in these places then Harmon's Chicago group and a
                  Cleveland concern would be given a franchise for 1927-28, providing, of
                  course, they could how the proper backing.

                  "Tom Duggan apparently wanted Hardwick, Harmon, Bierer and Cleveland all
                  admitted to membership this season, but the others believed it too big an
                  expansion in one season, especially with the New York Rangers entering for
                  the first time next season....

                  "It is understood that Eugene Gary **of the New York Americans** holds an
                  option or has bought the controlling interest in the Saskatoon club, and
                  **the team was to be sold to the Harmon interests in Chicago.**"

                  Since Hammond and Rickard are backing Hardwick and opposing Harmon, while
                  Gary and Duggan are apparently in cahoots with Harmon, it's clear by this
                  point that whoever owned the Amerks was not paddling in the same direction
                  as the Rangers.

                  Duggan's name keeps coming up in connection with hockey in New York. And he
                  certainly would have been known to Dwyer: Duggan ran Mount Royal Arena,
                  while Dwyer, according to one of the Times pieces about his bootlegging
                  indictment, owned a chunk of the Mount Royal racetrack.

                  Which raises a question for Montreal-based members of the list: was there
                  ever such a track? The only Montreal track I'm familiar with is the late,
                  unlamented Blue Bonnets, which doesn't mean anything, since in 1925 in
                  Toronto there were several tracks that have disappeared from memory
                  (Thorncliffe, Dufferin Park, Greenwood, to name only three).

                  Yes, you'll go cross-eyed trying to figure this stuff out. And one of the
                  themes of Deceptions and Doublecross was that, while it's important to go
                  back to contemporary sources, it's also important to know that the material
                  is less than neutral in its tone or motives. For instance, the Tribune seems
                  to have taken great pleasure in tweaking Paddy Harmon, which suggests that
                  somewhere in Chicago there was a paper that was pushing him as the natural
                  owner of an NHL franchise, if not the greatest thing since sliced bread.

                  --
                  Lloyd Davis Communications
                  304-115 Danforth Ave., Toronto, ON M4K 1N2
                  416 465 6999 /// 416 462 0230 (fax)
                  ldavis@...
                • Morey Holzman
                  This version was my basis when writing this particular chapter. However, Dwyer was incarcerated at the birth of the Americans, and Rickard had made overtures
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 8, 2005
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                    This version was my basis when writing this particular chapter.
                    However, Dwyer was incarcerated at the birth of the Americans, and
                    Rickard had made overtures to purchase the Hamilton Tigers as early
                    as Jan 1925 - with plenty of hockey (not to mention an infamous
                    strike) still to come. An astute historian would note that Gorman
                    had sold his interest in the Ottawa Senators in December 1924, and
                    started negotiation for the general manager's job at Madison Square
                    Garden, which he would officially land in March 1925.

                    According to Percy Thompson, the manager of the Tigers, the $80K was
                    not even close. In an interview with Milt Dunnell, circa 1953, he
                    stated the price was about $16K, with the rest to be paid in
                    installments. And that Thompson had to travel to NY to get the
                    money. Who paid the money? According to Thompson, Rickard and
                    Dwyer, on subsequent trips.

                    Duggan, a Montrealer IIRC, was nothing more than an agent. He had
                    been trying for about 5 years to sell NHL franchises before he
                    succeeded in landing Boston.

                    Morey

                    --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "brian_moore_67"
                    <brian_moore_67@y...> wrote:
                    > In his book When The Rangers Were Young, Frank Boucher has it that
                    Tom
                    > Duggan was given the rights to 3 teams. He sold one to Charles
                    Adams
                    > in Boston and one to Bill Dwyer in NY. Dwyer didn't have any
                    players,
                    > so Hammond arranged for the Gardens to buy the Hamilton players
                    rights
                    > for $80,000 and allowed the Americans to play in the Gardens, on
                    the
                    > condition that he could buy the third team from Duggan if they
                    wanted
                    > to put their own team in the Gardens. Dwyer didn't read the
                    contract
                    > Duggan wrote up and "was tunderstruck when he found there was
                    going to
                    > be another New York team." It says Hammond was honorary president
                    of
                    > the Americans and Dwyer was the owner.
                    >
                    > Brian Moore
                    > Aylesford, Nova Scotia
                    >
                    > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "stevenmcohen"
                    <stevenmcohen@y...> wrote:
                    > You note that Rickard (with John Hammond, Chairman of Madison
                    > > Square Gardeon) obtained an NHL Franchise. The franchise was
                    > > then "flipped" to Dwyer, who paid $75,000 for the Hamilton
                    Club.
                    > > {Note: Why did Dwyer need the "franchise" when he went out and
                    > > bought the Tigers?}
                    > > Thanks for any help.
                    > >
                    > > Steve Cohen
                    > > Brooklyn, New York
                  • nieforth
                    If I recall correctly, Duggan was one of the bidders for the Canadiens when George (Kendall) Kennedy died. Duggan had a higher bid but was rejected by the
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 9, 2005
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                      If I recall correctly, Duggan was one of the bidders for the Canadiens
                      when George (Kendall) Kennedy died. Duggan had a higher bid but was
                      rejected by the estate.

                      Duggan showed up at regularly at NHL meetings in the '20s. Most of
                      the time he was trying to act as their agent in peddling new
                      franchises.

                      Joseph
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