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  • Wayne & Heather
    Does anyone have a boxscore for a Bruins game against st.louis between 1973 and 76 that the bruins won 7-0 and Orr got a hatrick??? ... From:
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2004
      Does anyone have a boxscore for a Bruins game against st.louis between 1973
      and 76 that the bruins won 7-0 and Orr got a hatrick???
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <hockhist@yahoogroups.com>
      To: <hockhist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2004 11:54 PM
      Subject: [hockhist] Digest Number 2663



      There are 7 messages in this issue.

      Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
      From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
      2. Re: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
      From: "Darren Becker" <dwbecker@...>
      3. Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
      From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
      4. Re: Canadian Hockey Players ---- WWII
      From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
      5. RE: Fleury
      From: "William Underwood" <wausport@...>
      6. Re: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
      From: Hockey Collector <rockstar@...>
      7. Français Volants and Southampton
      From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>


      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 1
      Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 15:54:18 -0000
      From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
      Subject: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)

      --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Garcia" <yvoneve@y...> wrote:
      > Apparently the "secret" is to have your stick hit the ice 3/4"
      > before it hits the puck.
      >
      > As someone who played plenty of street hockey as a lad, but no
      > farther than that, I was left to ponder this.
      >
      > Is there truth to that?
      > It would seem that it would all depend on how high one would
      > want the puck to come off the ice. To hit the puck dead on would
      > result in a low shot which is sometimes preferable.

      In the January/February edition of the (now defunct)
      Canadian "Equinox" magazine, there is a feature called "How hockey
      works". One of the articles in it is called "Snapshots of a slap
      shot: A freeze-frame study of the power and precision of hockey's
      split-second play".

      The slap shot is broken up in six parts: preparation, the windup, the
      downswing, loading the stick, impact, and the follow-through. The
      description of the downswing contains the following: "[.] until the
      blade comes in contact with the ice approximately 10 centimetres
      [that's 4 inches, not 3/4 inches] behind the puck. Hoshizaki is still
      studying why 10 centimetres is the optimal distance but believes that
      any less reduces the amount the stick can be loaded (see next entry)
      and any more risks breaking the shaft.".

      The next entry, loading the stick, explains what happens when the
      stick hits the ice: "At this point, the shooter continues to apply
      pressure on the stick by pushing the lower hand against the shaft and
      holding the upper end of the stick close to the body. This causes the
      shaft to bow and thereby store energy. (A top player can make the
      shaft bow four to five centimetres.) Now the resting place of the
      lower hand on the shaft is critical. If it is too high, the shooter
      will not be able to bend the shaft enough to maximize energy load; if
      it is too low, not as much energy will be transferred to the puck.
      The best compromise position is set by a variety of other factors
      [strength, height, skill of the player]. This is the most important
      stage of the slap shot because so much of the velocity is generated
      here.".

      The rest of the explanation is under Impact: "As the movement
      continues, the blade catches the puck, releases energy and
      accelerates the puck as it clears the ice. Ideally, the puck is
      struck by the heel of the blade, which is the "sweet spot" of a
      hockey stick: because it is closer to and in line with the shaft, it
      offers more effective energy transfer. The farther out on the blade
      the puck is struck, the more torque, or twisting force, there is.
      That's why players can take flick shots off the tip of the blade that
      rise quickly but lack the speed of shots taken at the heel. During
      this stage of the slap shot, the shooter rotates the shaft forward so
      that the blade turns over until it faces down toward the ice. This
      motion increases the acceleration of the puck by maintaining the
      force on it instead of letting it roll off an open-face blade."

      In Bruce Downbiggin's book, "The Stick", there is a similar
      explanation, though not as detailed, in pages 104-107. The book was
      published in 2001, so it still available.

      Note that if you go through the trouble of looking up the Equinox
      issue at the library, you will be rewarded. Besides the slap shot
      analysis, the "How hockey works" feature contains the following
      articles:

      * Mask Mastery - Perfecting the form took cagey thinking
      * The Flood That Frank Made - How the classic Zamboni gets in the
      grooves
      * Snow Job - The slippery challenge of getting good ice down cold
      * The Puck Starts Here - Recipe in rubber: How discs get done like
      dinner
      * Tricky Sticky - Space-age materials add flex to the mix
      * Women's Hockey: Speed, Smarts and Skills - Brains beat brawn in a
      fleet-footed game that bans the body check
      * Best Boot Forward: A Top Skate's Slick Turns - The not-so simple
      science of making a skate really do what it's told
      * A New Lease on Legs - Meet Sonya. She reinvents pro skating styles.
      [that's Sonya Shewchuk, then skating coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs]
      * The Burn Before the Buzzer - No pain, no game: The preseason shape-
      up
      * The Confidence Game: Psychology on Ice - From slumps to spectators,
      a player's burdens can be eased by counselling

      The articles were written by Robert Colapinto and Tim Falconer,
      Toronto-based writers and hockey buffs. "Equinox" dubbed
      itself "Canada's Magazine of Discovery", and could be compared to
      National Geographic. Too bad it's gone.

      Jean-Patrice



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 2
      Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 11:06:24 -0500
      From: "Darren Becker" <dwbecker@...>
      Subject: Re: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)

      Or go to www.exploratorium.edu/hockey.htm

      There's video of shots on there as well as some basic scientific
      explanations.

      Pucks would go faster if they didn't freeze them.


      Darren


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jean-Patrice Martel <jpmartel_18@...>
      To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com <hockhist@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Saturday, January 31, 2004 10:54 AM
      Subject: [hockhist] Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)


      --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Garcia" <yvoneve@y...> wrote:
      > Apparently the "secret" is to have your stick hit the ice 3/4"
      > before it hits the puck.
      >
      > As someone who played plenty of street hockey as a lad, but no
      > farther than that, I was left to ponder this.
      >
      > Is there truth to that?
      > It would seem that it would all depend on how high one would
      > want the puck to come off the ice. To hit the puck dead on would
      > result in a low shot which is sometimes preferable.

      In the January/February edition of the (now defunct)
      Canadian "Equinox" magazine, there is a feature called "How hockey
      works". One of the articles in it is called "Snapshots of a slap
      shot: A freeze-frame study of the power and precision of hockey's
      split-second play".

      The slap shot is broken up in six parts: preparation, the windup, the
      downswing, loading the stick, impact, and the follow-through. The
      description of the downswing contains the following: "[.] until the
      blade comes in contact with the ice approximately 10 centimetres
      [that's 4 inches, not 3/4 inches] behind the puck. Hoshizaki is still
      studying why 10 centimetres is the optimal distance but believes that
      any less reduces the amount the stick can be loaded (see next entry)
      and any more risks breaking the shaft.".

      The next entry, loading the stick, explains what happens when the
      stick hits the ice: "At this point, the shooter continues to apply
      pressure on the stick by pushing the lower hand against the shaft and
      holding the upper end of the stick close to the body. This causes the
      shaft to bow and thereby store energy. (A top player can make the
      shaft bow four to five centimetres.) Now the resting place of the
      lower hand on the shaft is critical. If it is too high, the shooter
      will not be able to bend the shaft enough to maximize energy load; if
      it is too low, not as much energy will be transferred to the puck.
      The best compromise position is set by a variety of other factors
      [strength, height, skill of the player]. This is the most important
      stage of the slap shot because so much of the velocity is generated
      here.".

      The rest of the explanation is under Impact: "As the movement
      continues, the blade catches the puck, releases energy and
      accelerates the puck as it clears the ice. Ideally, the puck is
      struck by the heel of the blade, which is the "sweet spot" of a
      hockey stick: because it is closer to and in line with the shaft, it
      offers more effective energy transfer. The farther out on the blade
      the puck is struck, the more torque, or twisting force, there is.
      That's why players can take flick shots off the tip of the blade that
      rise quickly but lack the speed of shots taken at the heel. During
      this stage of the slap shot, the shooter rotates the shaft forward so
      that the blade turns over until it faces down toward the ice. This
      motion increases the acceleration of the puck by maintaining the
      force on it instead of letting it roll off an open-face blade."

      In Bruce Downbiggin's book, "The Stick", there is a similar
      explanation, though not as detailed, in pages 104-107. The book was
      published in 2001, so it still available.

      Note that if you go through the trouble of looking up the Equinox
      issue at the library, you will be rewarded. Besides the slap shot
      analysis, the "How hockey works" feature contains the following
      articles:

      * Mask Mastery - Perfecting the form took cagey thinking
      * The Flood That Frank Made - How the classic Zamboni gets in the
      grooves
      * Snow Job - The slippery challenge of getting good ice down cold
      * The Puck Starts Here - Recipe in rubber: How discs get done like
      dinner
      * Tricky Sticky - Space-age materials add flex to the mix
      * Women's Hockey: Speed, Smarts and Skills - Brains beat brawn in a
      fleet-footed game that bans the body check
      * Best Boot Forward: A Top Skate's Slick Turns - The not-so simple
      science of making a skate really do what it's told
      * A New Lease on Legs - Meet Sonya. She reinvents pro skating styles.
      [that's Sonya Shewchuk, then skating coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs]
      * The Burn Before the Buzzer - No pain, no game: The preseason shape-
      up
      * The Confidence Game: Psychology on Ice - From slumps to spectators,
      a player's burdens can be eased by counselling

      The articles were written by Robert Colapinto and Tim Falconer,
      Toronto-based writers and hockey buffs. "Equinox" dubbed
      itself "Canada's Magazine of Discovery", and could be compared to
      National Geographic. Too bad it's gone.

      Jean-Patrice


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      To visit your group on the web, go to:
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      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 3
      Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 16:11:50 -0000
      From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
      Subject: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)

      --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Jean-Patrice Martel"
      > <jpmartel_18@y...> wrote:
      > The articles were written by Robert Colapinto and Tim Falconer,
      > Toronto-based writers and hockey buffs.

      I should have checked first... All of the articles contributed by Tim
      Falconer, including the anatomy of the slap shot, can be found at
      http://www.timfalconer.com/content/hockeywriting/howhockeyworks.html

      His web site also contains other articles about hockey.

      Jean-Patrice



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 4
      Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 16:33:40 -0000
      From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
      Subject: Re: Canadian Hockey Players ---- WWII

      --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "mphf2004" <anthony.meaning@b...>
      > wrote:
      > Are there any sites that you know of that can assist me in
      > researching Canadians that played in Great Britain before,
      > during and after WWII.
      > (1930's through to the 60's)

      I don't know about web sites, but the book "Flashing Blades", by Phil
      Drackett, is the story of British ice hockey, and contains a lot of
      names of Canadians who played there. The book was published in 1987
      and is therefore a little hard to find, but there's a least one
      British used books web site that currently has a copy for a
      reasonable price.

      Jean-Patrice



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 5
      Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 11:48:57 -0500
      From: "William Underwood" <wausport@...>
      Subject: RE: Fleury

      I think the WJC was a major factor in this one. It should have been a
      GREAT moment for the kid. The plan was for him to have a great tourney
      and come back with even more of a boost. Instead he ended up the goat,
      who would have thought that Canada would blow a lead, who would have
      thought he would have thought he would have let a goal in like that! But
      that is the problem with 18 year olds, you NEVER know and the damage of
      something like that is magnified in a young person.

      It is SO tough to handle a kid goalie in this overall situation. In an
      ideal world, he would be able to play in the AHL as an option but there
      are good reasons why this can't be done. After all junior hockey has to
      be protected from a hemorrhage of stars as it is the NHL's key
      developmental source.

      I tended to think that another year in junior would have done the kid a
      ton of good from day one! To bring a guy up at that age to such a weak
      line up is never a good thing! Sure he would have dominated but that can
      also be good. I remember in Quebec, Joe Sakic made our team as an 18
      year old but opted to go back to junior to play with his kid brother for
      a year. The difference that I saw in Joe the person from 18 to 19 was
      NIGHT and DAY...he was so much more mature! Sure he dominated the league
      when he went back but he also developed more poise and confidence.

      Had he been in junior, would it have been easier to cope with the WJC
      debacle? You can argue either way. On one hand he would have been in
      Canada where things were front page news and it could have been an
      inspiration for more than one road crowd to vent wrath. On the other
      hand, there is no player in the NHL that doesn't know about "the
      goal"... so I'm sure there could be barbs sent at him on the ice there.
      But the bigger issue is as Brian states, in Pittsburgh he is playing on
      an over glorified AHL line up in the NHL. So you come back to more
      discouragement and instead of getting some positive energy, you just
      spin into more negative energy. The Pens knew they were going to be bad
      this year even if Mario was healthy. They just would be a bad team with
      one great player. The smart HOCKEY move would have been to send the kid
      down from day one and bide their time. But then you get the off ice
      issue of trying to draw and a top draft pick goalie, if he can even play
      half decently is a message to fans that "things MIGHT get better..." Its
      too bad that this isn't a more stable organization as opposed to one
      that is one step ahead of folding and a half step and losing ground on
      relocation...a better scenario could say "just wait, you'll see the kid
      when he is good and ready".

      -----Original Message-----
      From: mtlhockey@... [mailto:mtlhockey@...]
      Sent: Friday, January 30, 2004 7:16 PM
      To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [hockhist] Fleury

      In a message dated 1/29/2004 7:22:14 PM Pacific Standard Time,
      risto@... writes:

      > The 19-year-old was set to collect $3 million US in bonuses if he
      > reached the 25-game mark for games played in his NHL contract.
      >
      > Money talks, bullshit ... Sits upstairs?
      >

      He would possibly collect that. He also had to reach a certain number of

      games won, goals against, and one other. None of which he would have
      most likely
      reached. So it was more then just the $3 million. They wanted him to go
      down
      and win and gain his confidence back. He was getting shelled in Pit and
      after
      the WJC, he needs to regain his form etc....

      Brian


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 6
      Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 11:51:29 -0500
      From: Hockey Collector <rockstar@...>
      Subject: Re: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)

      If you have ever seen a slow motion sequence of Brett Hull's slapshot you
      would be amazed at the bend on the stick - it almost defies physics.

      Keith Lenn, The Hockey Collector
      rockstar@...

      Read "Penned By Lenn" by visiting the Professional Hockey Players'
      Association home page at www.PHPA.com





      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 7
      Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 18:59:20 -0000
      From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
      Subject: Français Volants and Southampton

      At the beginning of the 1936-37 season, the French hockey
      teams "Français Volants" and "Sports Club Rapide de Paris" ran into
      financial difficulties and, in an unusual move, transferred to
      England, as the Southampton Vikings and Manchester Rapids
      respectively. This is fairly well documented.

      Now, the Français Volants de Paris are credited with winning the
      French championship (the Magnus Cup) in the 1935-36, 1936-37, and
      1937-38 seasons. How does that work?

      I can think of two possibilities. Either there were two teams called
      Français Volants (actually one called Français Volants, and one
      called Français Volants de Paris) playing at the same time, both
      based in Paris, and the first one is the one that relocated. It would
      seem strange that two teams would have the same name in the same
      city, but who knows. The CFL had the Rough Riders and the Roughriders
      in a 9-team league for many years. The other possibility is that
      there was only one team, which won one championship, then relocated,
      but immediately after, someone else built a new team from scratch
      with the same name, and went on to win two more championships in a
      row.

      Does anyone have details on this? In particular, had the relocated
      team played any game in France before relocating, or did it happen
      before the start of the season? Where could I find info on those
      games?

      As an aside, at least one source I found on the internet seemed to
      suggest that prior to relocating, the two teams, although based in
      Paris, were playing in the British League. The cost of travelling is
      then used to explain the financial difficulties. I haven't seen a
      confirmation of this anywhere, and I believe this info to be
      incorrect.

      Thanks,

      Jean-Patrice



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________


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    • Natalie Sekuler
      I don t have the box score, but I can tell you that the date of that game was March 21, 1974, at Boston. Larry Sekuler
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 1, 2004
        I don't have the box score, but I can tell you that the date of that game was March 21, 1974,
        at Boston.

        Larry Sekuler

        Wayne & Heather wrote:

        > Does anyone have a boxscore for a Bruins game against st.louis between 1973
        > and 76 that the bruins won 7-0 and Orr got a hatrick???
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: <hockhist@yahoogroups.com>
        > To: <hockhist@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2004 11:54 PM
        > Subject: [hockhist] Digest Number 2663
        >
        > There are 7 messages in this issue.
        >
        > Topics in this digest:
        >
        > 1. Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        > From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
        > 2. Re: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        > From: "Darren Becker" <dwbecker@...>
        > 3. Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        > From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
        > 4. Re: Canadian Hockey Players ---- WWII
        > From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
        > 5. RE: Fleury
        > From: "William Underwood" <wausport@...>
        > 6. Re: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        > From: Hockey Collector <rockstar@...>
        > 7. Français Volants and Southampton
        > From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
        >
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > Message: 1
        > Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 15:54:18 -0000
        > From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
        > Subject: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        >
        > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Garcia" <yvoneve@y...> wrote:
        > > Apparently the "secret" is to have your stick hit the ice 3/4"
        > > before it hits the puck.
        > >
        > > As someone who played plenty of street hockey as a lad, but no
        > > farther than that, I was left to ponder this.
        > >
        > > Is there truth to that?
        > > It would seem that it would all depend on how high one would
        > > want the puck to come off the ice. To hit the puck dead on would
        > > result in a low shot which is sometimes preferable.
        >
        > In the January/February edition of the (now defunct)
        > Canadian "Equinox" magazine, there is a feature called "How hockey
        > works". One of the articles in it is called "Snapshots of a slap
        > shot: A freeze-frame study of the power and precision of hockey's
        > split-second play".
        >
        > The slap shot is broken up in six parts: preparation, the windup, the
        > downswing, loading the stick, impact, and the follow-through. The
        > description of the downswing contains the following: "[.] until the
        > blade comes in contact with the ice approximately 10 centimetres
        > [that's 4 inches, not 3/4 inches] behind the puck. Hoshizaki is still
        > studying why 10 centimetres is the optimal distance but believes that
        > any less reduces the amount the stick can be loaded (see next entry)
        > and any more risks breaking the shaft.".
        >
        > The next entry, loading the stick, explains what happens when the
        > stick hits the ice: "At this point, the shooter continues to apply
        > pressure on the stick by pushing the lower hand against the shaft and
        > holding the upper end of the stick close to the body. This causes the
        > shaft to bow and thereby store energy. (A top player can make the
        > shaft bow four to five centimetres.) Now the resting place of the
        > lower hand on the shaft is critical. If it is too high, the shooter
        > will not be able to bend the shaft enough to maximize energy load; if
        > it is too low, not as much energy will be transferred to the puck.
        > The best compromise position is set by a variety of other factors
        > [strength, height, skill of the player]. This is the most important
        > stage of the slap shot because so much of the velocity is generated
        > here.".
        >
        > The rest of the explanation is under Impact: "As the movement
        > continues, the blade catches the puck, releases energy and
        > accelerates the puck as it clears the ice. Ideally, the puck is
        > struck by the heel of the blade, which is the "sweet spot" of a
        > hockey stick: because it is closer to and in line with the shaft, it
        > offers more effective energy transfer. The farther out on the blade
        > the puck is struck, the more torque, or twisting force, there is.
        > That's why players can take flick shots off the tip of the blade that
        > rise quickly but lack the speed of shots taken at the heel. During
        > this stage of the slap shot, the shooter rotates the shaft forward so
        > that the blade turns over until it faces down toward the ice. This
        > motion increases the acceleration of the puck by maintaining the
        > force on it instead of letting it roll off an open-face blade."
        >
        > In Bruce Downbiggin's book, "The Stick", there is a similar
        > explanation, though not as detailed, in pages 104-107. The book was
        > published in 2001, so it still available.
        >
        > Note that if you go through the trouble of looking up the Equinox
        > issue at the library, you will be rewarded. Besides the slap shot
        > analysis, the "How hockey works" feature contains the following
        > articles:
        >
        > * Mask Mastery - Perfecting the form took cagey thinking
        > * The Flood That Frank Made - How the classic Zamboni gets in the
        > grooves
        > * Snow Job - The slippery challenge of getting good ice down cold
        > * The Puck Starts Here - Recipe in rubber: How discs get done like
        > dinner
        > * Tricky Sticky - Space-age materials add flex to the mix
        > * Women's Hockey: Speed, Smarts and Skills - Brains beat brawn in a
        > fleet-footed game that bans the body check
        > * Best Boot Forward: A Top Skate's Slick Turns - The not-so simple
        > science of making a skate really do what it's told
        > * A New Lease on Legs - Meet Sonya. She reinvents pro skating styles.
        > [that's Sonya Shewchuk, then skating coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs]
        > * The Burn Before the Buzzer - No pain, no game: The preseason shape-
        > up
        > * The Confidence Game: Psychology on Ice - From slumps to spectators,
        > a player's burdens can be eased by counselling
        >
        > The articles were written by Robert Colapinto and Tim Falconer,
        > Toronto-based writers and hockey buffs. "Equinox" dubbed
        > itself "Canada's Magazine of Discovery", and could be compared to
        > National Geographic. Too bad it's gone.
        >
        > Jean-Patrice
        >
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > Message: 2
        > Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 11:06:24 -0500
        > From: "Darren Becker" <dwbecker@...>
        > Subject: Re: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        >
        > Or go to www.exploratorium.edu/hockey.htm
        >
        > There's video of shots on there as well as some basic scientific
        > explanations.
        >
        > Pucks would go faster if they didn't freeze them.
        >
        > Darren
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Jean-Patrice Martel <jpmartel_18@...>
        > To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com <hockhist@yahoogroups.com>
        > Date: Saturday, January 31, 2004 10:54 AM
        > Subject: [hockhist] Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        >
        > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Garcia" <yvoneve@y...> wrote:
        > > Apparently the "secret" is to have your stick hit the ice 3/4"
        > > before it hits the puck.
        > >
        > > As someone who played plenty of street hockey as a lad, but no
        > > farther than that, I was left to ponder this.
        > >
        > > Is there truth to that?
        > > It would seem that it would all depend on how high one would
        > > want the puck to come off the ice. To hit the puck dead on would
        > > result in a low shot which is sometimes preferable.
        >
        > In the January/February edition of the (now defunct)
        > Canadian "Equinox" magazine, there is a feature called "How hockey
        > works". One of the articles in it is called "Snapshots of a slap
        > shot: A freeze-frame study of the power and precision of hockey's
        > split-second play".
        >
        > The slap shot is broken up in six parts: preparation, the windup, the
        > downswing, loading the stick, impact, and the follow-through. The
        > description of the downswing contains the following: "[.] until the
        > blade comes in contact with the ice approximately 10 centimetres
        > [that's 4 inches, not 3/4 inches] behind the puck. Hoshizaki is still
        > studying why 10 centimetres is the optimal distance but believes that
        > any less reduces the amount the stick can be loaded (see next entry)
        > and any more risks breaking the shaft.".
        >
        > The next entry, loading the stick, explains what happens when the
        > stick hits the ice: "At this point, the shooter continues to apply
        > pressure on the stick by pushing the lower hand against the shaft and
        > holding the upper end of the stick close to the body. This causes the
        > shaft to bow and thereby store energy. (A top player can make the
        > shaft bow four to five centimetres.) Now the resting place of the
        > lower hand on the shaft is critical. If it is too high, the shooter
        > will not be able to bend the shaft enough to maximize energy load; if
        > it is too low, not as much energy will be transferred to the puck.
        > The best compromise position is set by a variety of other factors
        > [strength, height, skill of the player]. This is the most important
        > stage of the slap shot because so much of the velocity is generated
        > here.".
        >
        > The rest of the explanation is under Impact: "As the movement
        > continues, the blade catches the puck, releases energy and
        > accelerates the puck as it clears the ice. Ideally, the puck is
        > struck by the heel of the blade, which is the "sweet spot" of a
        > hockey stick: because it is closer to and in line with the shaft, it
        > offers more effective energy transfer. The farther out on the blade
        > the puck is struck, the more torque, or twisting force, there is.
        > That's why players can take flick shots off the tip of the blade that
        > rise quickly but lack the speed of shots taken at the heel. During
        > this stage of the slap shot, the shooter rotates the shaft forward so
        > that the blade turns over until it faces down toward the ice. This
        > motion increases the acceleration of the puck by maintaining the
        > force on it instead of letting it roll off an open-face blade."
        >
        > In Bruce Downbiggin's book, "The Stick", there is a similar
        > explanation, though not as detailed, in pages 104-107. The book was
        > published in 2001, so it still available.
        >
        > Note that if you go through the trouble of looking up the Equinox
        > issue at the library, you will be rewarded. Besides the slap shot
        > analysis, the "How hockey works" feature contains the following
        > articles:
        >
        > * Mask Mastery - Perfecting the form took cagey thinking
        > * The Flood That Frank Made - How the classic Zamboni gets in the
        > grooves
        > * Snow Job - The slippery challenge of getting good ice down cold
        > * The Puck Starts Here - Recipe in rubber: How discs get done like
        > dinner
        > * Tricky Sticky - Space-age materials add flex to the mix
        > * Women's Hockey: Speed, Smarts and Skills - Brains beat brawn in a
        > fleet-footed game that bans the body check
        > * Best Boot Forward: A Top Skate's Slick Turns - The not-so simple
        > science of making a skate really do what it's told
        > * A New Lease on Legs - Meet Sonya. She reinvents pro skating styles.
        > [that's Sonya Shewchuk, then skating coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs]
        > * The Burn Before the Buzzer - No pain, no game: The preseason shape-
        > up
        > * The Confidence Game: Psychology on Ice - From slumps to spectators,
        > a player's burdens can be eased by counselling
        >
        > The articles were written by Robert Colapinto and Tim Falconer,
        > Toronto-based writers and hockey buffs. "Equinox" dubbed
        > itself "Canada's Magazine of Discovery", and could be compared to
        > National Geographic. Too bad it's gone.
        >
        > Jean-Patrice
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this mail list, send a blank message to
        > hockhist-unsubscribe@onelist.com
        >
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        >
        > To visit your group on the web, go to:
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        >
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        >
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > Message: 3
        > Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 16:11:50 -0000
        > From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
        > Subject: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        >
        > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Jean-Patrice Martel"
        > > <jpmartel_18@y...> wrote:
        > > The articles were written by Robert Colapinto and Tim Falconer,
        > > Toronto-based writers and hockey buffs.
        >
        > I should have checked first... All of the articles contributed by Tim
        > Falconer, including the anatomy of the slap shot, can be found at
        > http://www.timfalconer.com/content/hockeywriting/howhockeyworks.html
        >
        > His web site also contains other articles about hockey.
        >
        > Jean-Patrice
        >
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > Message: 4
        > Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 16:33:40 -0000
        > From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
        > Subject: Re: Canadian Hockey Players ---- WWII
        >
        > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "mphf2004" <anthony.meaning@b...>
        > > wrote:
        > > Are there any sites that you know of that can assist me in
        > > researching Canadians that played in Great Britain before,
        > > during and after WWII.
        > > (1930's through to the 60's)
        >
        > I don't know about web sites, but the book "Flashing Blades", by Phil
        > Drackett, is the story of British ice hockey, and contains a lot of
        > names of Canadians who played there. The book was published in 1987
        > and is therefore a little hard to find, but there's a least one
        > British used books web site that currently has a copy for a
        > reasonable price.
        >
        > Jean-Patrice
        >
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > Message: 5
        > Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 11:48:57 -0500
        > From: "William Underwood" <wausport@...>
        > Subject: RE: Fleury
        >
        > I think the WJC was a major factor in this one. It should have been a
        > GREAT moment for the kid. The plan was for him to have a great tourney
        > and come back with even more of a boost. Instead he ended up the goat,
        > who would have thought that Canada would blow a lead, who would have
        > thought he would have thought he would have let a goal in like that! But
        > that is the problem with 18 year olds, you NEVER know and the damage of
        > something like that is magnified in a young person.
        >
        > It is SO tough to handle a kid goalie in this overall situation. In an
        > ideal world, he would be able to play in the AHL as an option but there
        > are good reasons why this can't be done. After all junior hockey has to
        > be protected from a hemorrhage of stars as it is the NHL's key
        > developmental source.
        >
        > I tended to think that another year in junior would have done the kid a
        > ton of good from day one! To bring a guy up at that age to such a weak
        > line up is never a good thing! Sure he would have dominated but that can
        > also be good. I remember in Quebec, Joe Sakic made our team as an 18
        > year old but opted to go back to junior to play with his kid brother for
        > a year. The difference that I saw in Joe the person from 18 to 19 was
        > NIGHT and DAY...he was so much more mature! Sure he dominated the league
        > when he went back but he also developed more poise and confidence.
        >
        > Had he been in junior, would it have been easier to cope with the WJC
        > debacle? You can argue either way. On one hand he would have been in
        > Canada where things were front page news and it could have been an
        > inspiration for more than one road crowd to vent wrath. On the other
        > hand, there is no player in the NHL that doesn't know about "the
        > goal"... so I'm sure there could be barbs sent at him on the ice there.
        > But the bigger issue is as Brian states, in Pittsburgh he is playing on
        > an over glorified AHL line up in the NHL. So you come back to more
        > discouragement and instead of getting some positive energy, you just
        > spin into more negative energy. The Pens knew they were going to be bad
        > this year even if Mario was healthy. They just would be a bad team with
        > one great player. The smart HOCKEY move would have been to send the kid
        > down from day one and bide their time. But then you get the off ice
        > issue of trying to draw and a top draft pick goalie, if he can even play
        > half decently is a message to fans that "things MIGHT get better..." Its
        > too bad that this isn't a more stable organization as opposed to one
        > that is one step ahead of folding and a half step and losing ground on
        > relocation...a better scenario could say "just wait, you'll see the kid
        > when he is good and ready".
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: mtlhockey@... [mailto:mtlhockey@...]
        > Sent: Friday, January 30, 2004 7:16 PM
        > To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [hockhist] Fleury
        >
        > In a message dated 1/29/2004 7:22:14 PM Pacific Standard Time,
        > risto@... writes:
        >
        > > The 19-year-old was set to collect $3 million US in bonuses if he
        > > reached the 25-game mark for games played in his NHL contract.
        > >
        > > Money talks, bullshit ... Sits upstairs?
        > >
        >
        > He would possibly collect that. He also had to reach a certain number of
        >
        > games won, goals against, and one other. None of which he would have
        > most likely
        > reached. So it was more then just the $3 million. They wanted him to go
        > down
        > and win and gain his confidence back. He was getting shelled in Pit and
        > after
        > the WJC, he needs to regain his form etc....
        >
        > Brian
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this mail list, send a blank message to
        > hockhist-unsubscribe@onelist.com
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > To visit your group on the web, go to:
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        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > hockhist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
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        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > Message: 6
        > Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 11:51:29 -0500
        > From: Hockey Collector <rockstar@...>
        > Subject: Re: Re: Secret of the slap shot (was: TV and hockey)
        >
        > If you have ever seen a slow motion sequence of Brett Hull's slapshot you
        > would be amazed at the bend on the stick - it almost defies physics.
        >
        > Keith Lenn, The Hockey Collector
        > rockstar@...
        >
        > Read "Penned By Lenn" by visiting the Professional Hockey Players'
        > Association home page at www.PHPA.com
        >
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > Message: 7
        > Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 18:59:20 -0000
        > From: "Jean-Patrice Martel" <jpmartel_18@...>
        > Subject: Français Volants and Southampton
        >
        > At the beginning of the 1936-37 season, the French hockey
        > teams "Français Volants" and "Sports Club Rapide de Paris" ran into
        > financial difficulties and, in an unusual move, transferred to
        > England, as the Southampton Vikings and Manchester Rapids
        > respectively. This is fairly well documented.
        >
        > Now, the Français Volants de Paris are credited with winning the
        > French championship (the Magnus Cup) in the 1935-36, 1936-37, and
        > 1937-38 seasons. How does that work?
        >
        > I can think of two possibilities. Either there were two teams called
        > Français Volants (actually one called Français Volants, and one
        > called Français Volants de Paris) playing at the same time, both
        > based in Paris, and the first one is the one that relocated. It would
        > seem strange that two teams would have the same name in the same
        > city, but who knows. The CFL had the Rough Riders and the Roughriders
        > in a 9-team league for many years. The other possibility is that
        > there was only one team, which won one championship, then relocated,
        > but immediately after, someone else built a new team from scratch
        > with the same name, and went on to win two more championships in a
        > row.
        >
        > Does anyone have details on this? In particular, had the relocated
        > team played any game in France before relocating, or did it happen
        > before the start of the season? Where could I find info on those
        > games?
        >
        > As an aside, at least one source I found on the internet seemed to
        > suggest that prior to relocating, the two teams, although based in
        > Paris, were playing in the British League. The cost of travelling is
        > then used to explain the financial difficulties. I haven't seen a
        > confirmation of this anywhere, and I believe this info to be
        > incorrect.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Jean-Patrice
        >
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
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        > hockhist-unsubscribe@onelist.com
        >
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      • nieforth
        As a courtesy, please trim your message before sending. Here s the summary that I have. St. Louis 0 @ Boston 7 First Period 1. Boston, Orr 28th (Esposito,
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 1, 2004
          As a courtesy, please trim your message before sending. Here's the
          summary that I have.

          St. Louis 0 @ Boston 7

          First Period
          1. Boston, Orr 28th (Esposito, Hodge) 17:29
          Penalties- Polis(SL) 3:40; Cashman(B) 18:49

          Second Period
          2. Boston, Orr 29th (Edestrand, Esposito) 1:50
          3. Boston, Bucyk 28th (Forbes, Vadnais) 5:52
          4. Boston, Hodge 47th (Esposito) 8:33
          5. Boston, Marcotte 23rd (Sheppard) 14:46
          Penalties- Awrey(SL) 1:36; Savard(B) 1:36; Plante(SL) 10:26; Doak(B)
          13:28; O'Reilly(B) 19:01

          Third Period
          6. Boston, Forbes 8th (Cashman, Edestrand) 12:12
          7. Boston, Orr 30th (Forbes, Sheppard) 13:22
          Penalties- Smith(B) 9:55; Plante(SL) 16:52

          Shots on Goal
          St. Louis 5 10 5 - 20
          Boston 12 10 10 - 32
          Goaltenders- St. Louis, Stephenson, Watt; Boston, Gilbert
          Attendance - 15,003

          Notes- Gilbert's 6th shutout of season (3 against St. Louis), Hodge
          left game with a groin injury.
          Source- The Globe and Mail, Toronto.
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