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50-mile radius protected area

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  • Jean-Patrice Martel
    Before the entry draft was introduced to the NHL (mid-sixties), teams were given full rights to any player within a 50-mile radius of their home town. When was
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 4, 2004
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      Before the entry draft was introduced to the NHL (mid-sixties), teams
      were given full rights to any player within a 50-mile radius of their
      home town.

      When was that rule introduced exactly, and what was its exact
      wording? And in case it was (perhaps deliberately) vaguely worded,
      how was it interpreted?

      Some specific examples.

      How was the distance criterion defined? Was it 50 miles from the home
      arena of the team, or 50 miles from the outskirts of the city it
      played in? Was the distance measured to the arena of the team with
      which the kid played, or to his home address, or was the whole town
      included as long as some part of it was within the 50-mile radius?
      Even in that case, what if a kid from a neighbouring town (more than
      50 miles away) played in a less than 50-mile-away town (or vice-
      versa)?

      Also, what age of players was covered by the rule? Did a team
      specifically have to name each kid it considered covered by the rule,
      or could they go back in time and say "well, when he was x years old,
      he was playing only 38 miles from our town, so he belonged to us, and
      so he still does".

      If a team showed no interest in a kid, could he at some point offer
      his services to the other teams?

      Is there any book or article that discusses this rule in some detail?

      An additional question on a similar subject.

      On May 7, 1936, with the Canadiens doing very poorly, they were
      given, for a three-year period, first claim on all French-Canadian
      amateur hockey players in all of Canada. Later, in 1963, when the
      entry draft was introduced, there was a similar provision, with the
      Habs being granted the option of selecting up to two players of
      French-Canadian heritage before any other team could exercise its
      first selections.

      In both cases, how was French-Canadian heritage defined?

      Jean-Patrice
    • Natalie Sekuler
      In the 1960s version, French-Canadian heritage was defined as having a French-Canadian father. Larry Sekuler
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 5, 2004
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        In the 1960s version, French-Canadian heritage was defined as having a French-Canadian father.

        Larry Sekuler

        Jean-Patrice Martel wrote:

        > Before the entry draft was introduced to the NHL (mid-sixties), teams
        > were given full rights to any player within a 50-mile radius of their
        > home town.
        >
        > When was that rule introduced exactly, and what was its exact
        > wording? And in case it was (perhaps deliberately) vaguely worded,
        > how was it interpreted?
        >
        > Some specific examples.
        >
        > How was the distance criterion defined? Was it 50 miles from the home
        > arena of the team, or 50 miles from the outskirts of the city it
        > played in? Was the distance measured to the arena of the team with
        > which the kid played, or to his home address, or was the whole town
        > included as long as some part of it was within the 50-mile radius?
        > Even in that case, what if a kid from a neighbouring town (more than
        > 50 miles away) played in a less than 50-mile-away town (or vice-
        > versa)?
        >
        > Also, what age of players was covered by the rule? Did a team
        > specifically have to name each kid it considered covered by the rule,
        > or could they go back in time and say "well, when he was x years old,
        > he was playing only 38 miles from our town, so he belonged to us, and
        > so he still does".
        >
        > If a team showed no interest in a kid, could he at some point offer
        > his services to the other teams?
        >
        > Is there any book or article that discusses this rule in some detail?
        >
        > An additional question on a similar subject.
        >
        > On May 7, 1936, with the Canadiens doing very poorly, they were
        > given, for a three-year period, first claim on all French-Canadian
        > amateur hockey players in all of Canada. Later, in 1963, when the
        > entry draft was introduced, there was a similar provision, with the
        > Habs being granted the option of selecting up to two players of
        > French-Canadian heritage before any other team could exercise its
        > first selections.
        >
        > In both cases, how was French-Canadian heritage defined?
        >
        > Jean-Patrice
        >
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      • William Underwood
        ... were given full rights to any player within a 50-mile radius of their home town. When was that rule introduced exactly, and what was its exact wording? And
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 5, 2004
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          >Before the entry draft was introduced to the NHL (mid-sixties), teams
          were given full rights to any player within a 50-mile radius of their
          home town.

          When was that rule introduced exactly, and what was its exact
          wording? And in case it was (perhaps deliberately) vaguely worded,
          >how was it interpreted?

          Actually how it worked was this, another team could not affiliate with a
          club within 50 miles of your rink without your written permission. Hence
          you really didn't technically own every player in that radius. If he was
          with an independent club, anyone could sign him to a C form (like
          Gilbert or Parent) or be with a club that you gave then right to operate
          like Toronto allowed Boston to do in Oshawa.

          >Some specific examples.

          How was the distance criterion defined? Was it 50 miles from the home
          arena of the team, or 50 miles from the outskirts of the city it
          >played in?

          The rink.

          >Was the distance measured to the arena of the team with
          which the kid played, or to his home address, or was the whole town
          >included as long as some part of it was within the 50-mile radius?

          Where his club played.

          >Even in that case, what if a kid from a neighbouring town (more than
          50 miles away) played in a less than 50-mile-away town (or vice-
          >versa)?

          Where his club played would determine things. But that club would HAVE
          to be an AFFILIATE or else he was open game for a C form!

          >Also, what age of players was covered by the rule?

          I believe through 20.

          > Did a team
          specifically have to name each kid it considered covered by the rule,
          or could they go back in time and say "well, when he was x years old,
          he was playing only 38 miles from our town, so he belonged to us, and
          >so he still does".

          YES. He not only had to play for an affiliate or sign a C form with them
          but also be on their protected list which was made up of 18 plus 2 for
          each sponsored amateur team. This is how the Leafs lost Brad Park, he
          was on an affiliate but they didn't protect him!

          >If a team showed no interest in a kid, could he at some point offer
          >his services to the other teams?

          Down the line if he didn't sign a C form and wasn't on a protected list
          or slapped on a 4 name neg list and maintained on it he would be free.

          Is there any book or article that discusses this rule in some detail?

          In the NHL book about the 6 team league it drops some hints as does
          Fischlers "Up From the Minor Leagues of Hockey". The Park thing was
          mentioned as I recall in one of Punch's books.

          >An additional question on a similar subject.

          On May 7, 1936, with the Canadiens doing very poorly, they were
          given, for a three-year period, first claim on all French-Canadian
          amateur hockey players in all of Canada. Later, in 1963, when the
          entry draft was introduced, there was a similar provision, with the
          Habs being granted the option of selecting up to two players of
          French-Canadian heritage before any other team could exercise its
          first selections.

          >In both cases, how was French-Canadian heritage defined?

          Your father had to be born of French Canadian extraction AND to have
          been born in Quebec.



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        • Richard Krueger
          ... So, it wasn t really French Canadian then, but Quebecois. It ignored the French Canadians in New Brunswick and Manitoba. Richard.
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 6, 2004
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            > >In both cases, how was French-Canadian heritage defined?
            >
            > Your father had to be born of French Canadian extraction AND to have
            > been born in Quebec.

            So, it wasn't really "French Canadian" then, but Quebecois. It
            ignored the French Canadians in New Brunswick and Manitoba.

            Richard.
          • William Underwood
            Yes, unless you were a French Canadien from there who s dad was a Quebeccois. And it really made sense! The concept was to keep a francophone Quebeccois
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 6, 2004
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              Yes, unless you were a French Canadien from there who's dad was a
              Quebeccois. And it really made sense! The concept was to keep a
              francophone Quebeccois tradition rather than one of guys with French
              names who maybe have a few drops of French blood but didn't speak the
              language nor really have Quebec ties.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Richard Krueger [mailto:dig4fish@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 7:53 PM
              To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [hockhist] Re: 50-mile radius protected area

              > >In both cases, how was French-Canadian heritage defined?
              >
              > Your father had to be born of French Canadian extraction AND to have
              > been born in Quebec.

              So, it wasn't really "French Canadian" then, but Quebecois. It
              ignored the French Canadians in New Brunswick and Manitoba.

              Richard.



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