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Re: [hockhist] Those Who Left Us In 2003

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  • Karkoski James
    ... The one thing about Magnuson when he joined the Hawks was that he made the NHL coming right out of the NCAA. A lot of was made about it that he was
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 31, 2003
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      >
      > That's a lot of good people the hockey world lost in 2003... The
      > sudden deaths of Brooks and Magnuson are still shocking to me and of
      > course, is Snyder's...Does anybody have any particular memories of
      > Magnuson from his Black Hawk days?
      >
      > Brad
      >
      >


      The one thing about Magnuson when he joined the 'Hawks was that he made
      the NHL coming right out of the NCAA. A lot of was made about it that
      he was college developed player who went straight into the NHL.


      James
    • nieforth
      A late entry to this category is Paul Larivee, who passed away on Dec. 8, 2003. Joseph
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 13, 2004
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        A late entry to this category is Paul Larivee, who passed away on
        Dec. 8, 2003.

        Joseph
      • Jean-Patrice Martel
        ... Thanks very much Joseph for this post. I had apparently missed it, as I can t imagine that the Montréal media didn t mention it. Paul Larivée was a
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 13, 2004
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          > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "nieforth" <nieforth@y...> wrote:
          > A late entry to this category is Paul Larivee, who passed away on
          > Dec. 8, 2003.

          Thanks very much Joseph for this post. I had apparently missed it, as
          I can't imagine that the Montréal media didn't mention it.

          Paul Larivée was a long-time contributor to La soirée du hockey,
          acting as an analyst both on the television and radio versions. I saw
          in his obituary that he contributed to it for 22 years, I was really
          amazed.

          A year and a half ago, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of La
          soirée du hockey, there was an hour-and-a-half special remembering
          the history of the program. Lots of people who had nothing to do with
          it were interviewed, like René Angélil (Céline Dion's husband),
          Cardinal Jean-Claude Turcotte, premier Bernard Landry, stand-up comic
          Daniel Lemire, etc. But Paul Larivée (and Robert Pépin, another long-
          time analyst) were not interviewed, and they weren't even mentioned.

          I think Larivée left La soirée du hockey around 1980, so I don't
          really remember very well what kind of analyst he was, but I do
          remember that I liked him. It seems to me that he was the guy who
          talked about the game that we were listening to (my latest memories
          are of radio work), and didn't feel compelled to pepper his
          interventions with irrelevant anecdotes.

          I never knew he'd been a professional hockey player (10 seasons with
          the AHL Providence Reds, in the fifties, early sixties), much less
          that he had been quite successful there (a 46-goal-in-64-game season
          in particular). It would be a cliché to say that in today's NHL he'd
          be a millionaire.

          One question, having played with the Reds from 1952 to 1962, what NHL
          team would he have belonged to?

          Jean-Patrice
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