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RE: [hockhist] RE: Re: State of the NHL - its about money, mos

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  • James Karkoski
    ... The Flyers were a surprise expansion team because it meant that the league had skipped by places like Baltimore, Seattle, and Portland who had been
    Message 1 of 32 , Jan 26, 2003
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      >From: William Underwood, wausport@...

      >
      >Not really Howard. There has been hockey in the Philly area since the 1890's
      >and it actually did quite well in the 30's and 40's in the AHL. In fact SO
      >well that the NHL was driven out of town!
      >
      >There always was a hockey community here. Actually minor pro teams were in
      >town from 1927-42 and with a brief break due to the war from 1946-8. It came
      >back in 1951 for a year then the league folded. The from 1955-63 when the
      >old arena burnt down. But the game continued RIGHT across the river in
      >Cherry Hill right on until the Flyers came to town. Hence for the bulk of
      >1927 on there has been hockey in the area at the pro level.


      The Flyers were a surprise expansion team because it meant that the
      league had skipped by places like Baltimore, Seattle, and Portland who
      had been supporting minor pro teams. The EHL was a senior league. Big
      city like Philly with only a senior league team and no arena.

      >In fact, Hobey Baker was a Philadelphian...


      And he never played the game until his parents sent him to a prep-school
      in New Hampshire.


      >There is more to this area in hockey than most people think. Then again are
      >somewhat of a cold weather city so there ought to be no great surprise. Was
      >it a popular game? No. But there WAS a history and SOME market existant and
      >the legacy of the 30's that it can be a good one. This may not have been
      >ideal territory but nor was it virgin...


      The only two NHL "virgin" territories that didn't have any hockey before
      are San Jose, Tampa Bay, & Florida.


      James
    • howes_elbow <maleestrus@hotmail.com>
      sometimes the lighting makes a big difference too. ever watch a game at nassau coliseum? they may as well be playing in a cave. I d hate to follow a whole
      Message 32 of 32 , Feb 2, 2003
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        sometimes the lighting makes a big difference too. ever watch a game
        at nassau coliseum? they may as well be playing in a cave. I'd hate
        to follow a whole season of their games on tv.

        another thing thats really bad is the overkill of dark uniforms. I
        know black jerseys sell, but most of these uniforms dont have enough
        contrast to stand out on tv. Games are harder to follow now than in
        the 80's and early 90's.

        Toronto and Montreal look good on tv largely because their uniforms
        are colourfull and draw the eyes attention. Olympic and WJ team
        uniforms also look excellent on tv because they stand out.

        having more colourfull uniforms wouldnt solve all of the TV problems
        but it would help. HDTV and better camera angles could go a long way
        too.




        --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "T.C. Lewis" <tlewis@a...> wrote:
        > I think the bigger issue on trying to follow the puck is that you
        can't
        > follow the puck well on TV at certain rinks while at others there
        is no
        > problem. Trying to watch a game at Anaheim is almost impossible
        but a game
        > from Toronto is fine. It seems that in some rinks the camera is
        much
        > further away and at a bad angle.
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: William Underwood [mailto:wausport@b...]
        > Sent: Sunday, February 02, 2003 11:51 AM
        > To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [hockhist] Re: State of the NHL - its about money, mos
        >
        >
        > >>Fans can't follow the puck (even the Fox puck failed to remedy
        > >>this)
        >
        > >Not to pick on William, but I don't understand this often repeated
        comment.
        > It is a black object on a white background. There are huge men
        with sticks
        > looking and pointing at it. Whether I am watching on TV or from
        the stands
        > or on those rare occasions I am actually playing, I seldom lose
        track of it.
        > (Actually, I try NOT to look at the puck sometimes to see who is
        playing
        > >where in order to better understand the game.)
        >
        > Which is the case for most of us regualr fans. I am just repeating
        what
        > people constantly say in focus groups. You would be better off
        talking to
        > them.
        >
        > >Football has a brown ball on a often brown (i.e. muddy) field with
        huge men
        > trying to deceive where the ball actually is. A white baseball can
        be lost
        > in the air when it is hit. The worst is golf where they have that
        > traditional TV shot of the white ball against the white sky. I can
        never
        > follow the ball and I wait until it stops rolling before I can see
        it again.
        > One reason I stopped playing golf is that I could never follow the
        ball when
        > I hit it.
        >
        > Do others here find it hard to follow the puck or because we grew
        up with
        > >hockey, you don't understand this widely quoted statement too.
        >
        > And all of this is true. Againniu suggest you ask the people that
        say this
        > in focus groups the question. Generally one thing that they bring
        up is it's
        > speed. And this is probably legitimate especially if you don't
        really know
        > what to expect in terms of it's path. Think about it, a football is
        big and
        > only moves as fast as the man carrying it. And a pass is a
        telegraphed play
        > easy to follow right to the reciever. A baseball has only one path
        from
        > pitcerhs mound to the batter and when hit the fielder tells you
        exaclty
        > where it is going by his reaction. In hockey, there are more
        chances of
        > deflection, interception etc and it is smaller and faster.
        >
        > But I can really offer no more than what people say. They say "it
        moves too
        > fast and I can't follow the action." And the cultural thing may
        come into
        > play too! they just aren't used to the speed and the free form sort
        of play.
        > An interesting comment that is indicative of how cultural bias can
        come into
        > play was one night on Moday Night Football they were plugging ABC
        hockey.
        > And Al Micheals said to John Madden "I want to get you to a hockey
        game
        > sometime John."Madden said "I only ever went to one but I dont'
        knwo I just
        > couldn't get it. All of the substitutions all of the time, it
        didn't make
        > sense to me." Now before you get all over this thinkn of it. Madden
        is a
        > football guy. You have separate and distinct platoons for offence
        and
        > defence, you have special units that are quite distinct in terms of
        the
        > players you put otu BY POSITION. That is, 5 Dbacks come onto the
        field it is
        > a nickel package. Four wide outs chack in you are in a spread. You
        know it
        > even before they break huddle! In hockey you may see a checking
        line come
        > put but unless you KNOW the players, there is nothing on the line
        up that
        > tells you they are a checking line. Hence for Madden, this is
        anarchy!
        >
        > Now contrast this to how Europeans loook at American football. Some
        freinds
        > of mine that re officals in the Gaelic Athletic Association went to
        see the
        > Steelers play in Dublin,. They HATED it! Why? Almost for the same
        reaons
        > that Madden loves it. "there were too many stoppages and all of the
        damn
        > "meetings" (they meant huddles), it was too stop and start. We
        couldn't
        > stand it and left at half time." Irish people just aren't used to
        these
        > things!
        >
        > So there may well actually be something to the "you grew up with it"
        > thing...
        >
        >
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