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51833Re: Basketball HOF vs Hockey HOF (was: Recognition for hockey's fem

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  • epenaltybox
    Jan 1, 2008
      For what it's worth, my home rinks (sic) in Escondido, California,
      (home to 0 NHL and 0 minor league teams - Ducks are about 70 miles
      away) has had a women's league for about eight years (Tuesday nights).

      Morey

      --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "craig_1965ca" <bflynn3@...> wrote:
      >
      > Chantel,
      >
      > Thanks for the kind words.
      >
      > Your situation was exactly what I saw growing up. Many of my
      friends
      > liked hockey and would have loved to play. And with one execption
      (a
      > very small league in the city where I lived that to be honest
      wasn't
      > very good either and no longer exists)they could not. There was no
      > girls leagues - I guess it wasn't considered "feminine" for girls
      to
      > play hockey at the time. I played in that before mentioned league
      and
      > we did have a female player by the name of Karen. She was a
      wonderful
      > skater, handled the puck well and played physically. She was our
      best
      > center and yet after playing the 1975-76 season with us she was too
      > old to stay in the league and no other league would take her as she
      > was a girl. That was my first experience with discrimination and it
      > has stuck with me. I don't like people getting "screwed" and that
      is
      > what happened in the past.
      >
      > Bill makes many excellent points when he points out the many
      > desearving men who are not in the HHOF. However I do believe that
      > with the growth of the World Championships and Olympics and female
      > hockey across the world that the HHOF should create a seperate
      female
      > category. That way there is no perception of a fmeale taking a male
      > spot in the hall. They would be totally seperate and distinct.
      >
      > Craig
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com, "Chantel" <chantel66@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Craig -
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > You said it far more eloquently than I could. My comments come
      from
      > growing
      > > up in Michigan and being denied the pleasure of playing hockey,
      > even with my
      > > cousins, because of my gender. So, I have channeled that love of
      > the game
      > > into research and watching the game. If I had lived in Ontario,
      > maybe things
      > > would have been different, thanks to women like her.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Chantel
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: hockhist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hockhist@yahoogroups.com]
      On
      > Behalf
      > > Of craig_1965ca
      > > Sent: Monday, December 31, 2007 7:43 PM
      > > To: hockhist@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [hockhist] Re: Basketball HOF vs Hockey HOF (was:
      > Recognition for
      > > hockey's fem
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Chantel,
      > >
      > > I agree with you 100% here. Just to emphasize I am reposting a
      note
      > I
      > > put out on Christmas Eve that I thought (perhaps wrongly) summed
      > things
      > > up fairly well.
      > >
      > > Craig
      > >
      > > Bill,
      > >
      > > Let me approach this in a slightly different way. First your
      points
      > > are all quite valid when you speak about people like Bill Hunter,
      > > Dave Branch, etc and the sacrifices many men have made to grow the
      > > game in both the US and Canada. Nobody could argue that with you.
      > >
      > > But looking back at Fran Rider we need to ask ourselves an
      important
      > > question. What was the status or "shape" of women's hockey before
      > she
      > > got involved and what is the status of it now? Let's think about
      > > that. When I was growing up there were no girls leagues. My
      friends
      > > had no place that they could play hockey - if they wanted to.
      > > Talented girls where banned in many cases from playing with boys -
      > > not becouse they were not good enough - all becouse of their
      gender.
      > > One team I played with when I was 11 had a very talented female
      > > player - she was the best center on our team. But the next year
      her
      > > playing days were over all because she was female - no league
      would
      > > allow her to play with boys and there was no female league for
      her
      > to
      > > play in.
      > >
      > > Due to people like Fran Rider that has changed. There are many
      girls
      > > leagues out there. Women now have their own World Championships
      and
      > > play in the Olympics. All this has been done in a period of 30 odd
      > > years. The sport has exploded to incompass the other half of the
      > > human race. Bill, that is an amazing feat - one that is surely as
      > > prominent and worthy of recognition in the Hall of Fame as any
      other
      > > builder.
      > >
      > > We cannot compare womens' and mens' hockey nor should we. I agree
      > > with you - have a seperate category but it is time that women's
      > > hockey is fully recognized in the Hall with their builders, stars,
      > > etc. After all it is not the "NHL Hall of Fame" - it is
      the "Hockey
      > > Hall of Fame." (Before you mention it I agree with you that it is
      > > appalling that so many European stars have been passed over by the
      > > Hall.)
      > >
      > > Craig
      > >
      > > --- In hockhist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:hockhist%
      > 40yahoogroups.com> ,
      > > "Chantel Cummings" <chantel66@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > So what ARE the requirements to get into the hall in your
      > opinion? Can
      > > > you honestly say that players from the 1930s or 1950s are at
      the
      > same
      > > > skill level as today's players? What about how much the game has
      > > > changed over time? The changes implemented, from new teams to
      the
      > > > instigator penalty, have all changed the game exponentially.
      All
      > these
      > > > posts are comparing apples and oranges. Since there are already
      > > > different criteria for entry - player, builder, official,
      > announcer -
      > > > I don't see the problem. Cammi Granato may not have been one of
      > the
      > > > greatest players in the game, but she and Hayley Wickenheiser
      > > > certainly opened up the game to girls and women. For that
      alone -
      > > > making a valuable contribution to the game - I would say they
      > merit
      > > > entry to the hall.
      > > >
      > > > Chantel Cummings
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
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