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Who Will Relocate First? Flames, Predators, or Oilers?

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  • topsteelerfanusa
    Hello All! I d like to present a question for some hockey fans input. I was recently listening to 1010 CFRB s (out of Toronto) Hockey Night when they were
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 4, 2002
      Hello All! I'd like to present a question for some hockey fans input.
      I was recently listening to 1010 CFRB's (out of Toronto) Hockey Night
      when they were discussing the financial state of the game. The
      conversation swayed over to franchises that may relocate within the
      next 3 or 4 seasons. Nashville, Calgary, and Edmonton were each
      discussed.

      Why are the season tix falling each year for the Predators? What are
      they doing to turn around the ticket issues? Why did such a major
      player in bringing the franchise to Nashville (Gaylord Corporation)
      bail on the franchise. That's a bad sign they've been discussing on
      the WIP here in Philly or WABC out of NY. The outlook sounds dark for
      the Preds future in Tennessee according to the media up here in the
      Northeast. What's happening?

      Some of the cities discussed this past week were these ->

      Kansas City: population of 2.3 million with a new downtown stadium in
      the works. A strong corporate presence and the rumor is the Hunt
      Family is involved in the talks with Bettman.

      Oklahoma City: population of 1.1 million with a new 20,000 seat arena
      downtown along the nations fastest growing entertainment district
      (Bricktown Canal) OkC's minor league hockey team has led all North
      American minor league hockey teams in attendance for the last 4
      seasons nearing 10,000 per this season. NORAD has recently assigned a
      Canadian base to the city relocating 25-30,000 Candians into work
      assignments within OkC. A strong corporate presence in the city with
      retired executives from the Shell Oil Company being the leaders of
      the hopeful group.

      Jacksonville: population 1.3 million and rated as the 2nd fastest
      growing city in the US during the 1990's. A new 18,000 seat downtown
      arena is approved next to a new 10k seat baseball stadium, Alltel
      Stadium, a new entertainment district, and 45 a story hotel. A couple
      of real estate magnets from the southeast coastal islands are said to
      be the leaders of the Jacksonville group.

      Other cities discussed were Cincinnati (CMSA 3.0 million); Hartford,
      Ct (MSA 1.2 million); Seattle (MSA 2.7 million); Portland (MSA 2.3
      million)

      Any input? Just curious ...
    • dmcg_98
      I ve been hearing the Predators are next in line. The local 1/2 partner is pulling out, season attendance continues to fall, and advertising dollars are
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 1, 2002
        I've been hearing the Predators are next in line. The local 1/2
        partner is pulling out, season attendance continues to fall, and
        advertising dollars are shrinking.
      • roadwrk
        http://www.sportsbusinessnews.com/sections/index.asp? sId=4&sStoryId=4503&selectDate= Nashville Predators Might Not Be the Ticket As the Nashville Predators
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 1, 2002
          http://www.sportsbusinessnews.com/sections/index.asp?
          sId=4&sStoryId=4503&selectDate=

          Nashville Predators Might Not Be the Ticket

          As the Nashville Predators enter the thick of the season-ticket
          selling season, they might do well to look North for inspiration.
          That's because the Northern teams are clearly holding the upper hand
          among the NHL's four newest franchises. That and this report from The
          Tennessean's John Glennon

          The Minnesota Wild recently capped season-ticket sales at 16,000 for
          the coming year, while the Columbus Blue Jackets have seen their
          season-ticket base surge from 12,000 to 14,000 after just one season.
          Both teams are expecting to sell out all 41 of their respective home
          games.

          The Predators and Atlanta Thrashers, meanwhile, are still seeking
          that level of enthusiasm.

          Though Predators officials remain adamant about not releasing a
          season-ticket count, team president Jack Diller said the
          organization's renewal rate has dropped slightly in each of the first
          three offseasons from about 90% to the current rate of about 85%.
          Nashville was required to have sold at least 12,000 season tickets
          before its inaugural year.

          In Atlanta, the Thrashers have seen their season-ticket base fall
          from approximately 12,500 to around 8,500 in two years.

          ''This isn't a sprint ? it's a marathon,'' NHL spokesman Frank Brown
          said. ''These clubs are here for the long haul, and they'll use every
          outlet to maximize their growth. The numbers right now are just
          points on a continuum.''

          The NHL's return to Minnesota last season following a seven-year
          absence was expected to be greeted with plenty of excitement, as the
          state is arguably more passionate about hockey than any other in the
          U.S.

          But even Wild officials were overwhelmed by last year's response, as
          the 41 home sellout crowds included 26 ''overflow'' crowds of 18,600
          or more. That and this report from The Tennessean's John Glennon

          Minnesota chose to cut its season ticket sales off at 16,000 this
          summer, just so the organization would have some game-night tickets
          available. The Wild's season-ticket waiting list currently stands at
          about 3,000.

          ''The fans here were hungry for the NHL's return and they've shown it
          in their support at the gate,'' said Bill Robertson, the Wild's vice
          president of communications and broadcasting. ''I'd say there have
          been a few factors. We've got local ownership, we had a brand new
          arena and we'd spent the last three years ? before the first puck was
          ever dropped ? rooting ourselves in the community.''

          There was no guarantee Columbus was going to accept the Blue Jackets
          in the same manner, since Ohio represented uncharted waters for the
          NHL. In addition, prospective season ticket-holders were required to
          pay for personal season licenses, essentially doubling the price of
          tickets.

          But any doubts about fan interest were erased toward the end of
          Columbus' initial season, as fans sold out the 18,136-seat Nationwide
          Arena for the last 15 home games.

          The club recorded a 99% renewal rate for season tickets this
          offseason, and saw its season ticket base jump from 12,000 to 14,000.
          That and this report from The Tennessean's John Glennon

          Andy Silverman, the Blue Jackets' vice president of ticket sales,
          said a new arena and a surprisingly competitive team that finished
          over .500 at home were two big factors.

          ''It also helps that we don't really have competition like Nashville
          does with the Titans there,'' Silverman said. ''We've got the [Ohio
          State] Buckeyes, but that's really not the same.''

          Diller, however, said he thinks the Predators should be more able to
          compete with Columbus than Minnesota.

          ''Certainly a market of that size, which is the same or smaller than
          Nashville, I'd like to see that same kind of thing going on here,''
          he said. ''That's something to shoot for.''

          Diller said the Predators' season ticket renewal rate of 85% is
          slightly ahead of the league average, adding that the drop from last
          season wasn't totally unexpected.

          ''It's a little surprising it wasn't greater, since it used to be
          that you couldn't stop the stock market from going up, and now you
          can't get it moving up,'' Diller said. ''In the past, those who
          weren't renewing would talk about individual reasons ? like moving,
          or divorce or something. This year, it's more about the economy.''

          The Predators averaged 15,895 fans per game last year, good enough to
          fill 93% of the Gaylord Entertainment Center's capacity, but also
          representing a drop of about 700 fans per game from Year 2.

          Nashville's southern counterpart, the Thrashers, have also found
          themselves struggling to regain the ticket numbers of their opening
          season. That and this report from The Tennessean's John Glennon

          Atlanta's average attendance dropped by nearly 2,000 fans per game in
          its second year, due in large part to a 1,500-drop in the season
          ticket base.

          ''Between the fact we didn't have a playoff team and the weakened
          economy, it was not really that unexpected,'' Thrashers President
          Stan Kasten said. ''And we've got one of the smaller markets to have
          four pro teams here.

          ''But because we did foresee a softer season-ticket market, we've
          worked a lot on single-game tickets. The first month of this season,
          we may have our highest attendance ever.''

          What the Predators need for higher attendance is more support from
          local businesses, according to Diller.

          ''Our individual market seems very strong,'' Diller said. ''All
          along, we've said the business side has to be our focus. It shouldn't
          be something that comes out of their fun budget, but out of their
          marketing and advertising budget ? to get more out of their
          spending.''

          Diller said the next few weeks are especially important for NHL
          season ticket sales, since fans start to think more about hockey as
          training camp gets underway in September.

          The Predators have even hired half a dozen telemarketers for the
          first time, in order to help make a bigger push.

          ''I'm not unhappy where we are right now,'' Diller said. ''But if
          we're at this point after we go through the prime selling season [of
          late August and September], then I would not be happy.''
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