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  • D. Atkinson
    Of course, the NHL was forced to do it....they re too stupid to do things like this on their own. Everyone on this list should send Parker a thank you note.
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
      Of course, the NHL was forced to do it....they're too stupid to do things
      like this on their own. Everyone on this list should send Parker a thank you note.

                              Decision a hit
                             League to resume counting 'secondary' stats

                             By JEAN LEFEBVRE -- Calgary Sun

                              A bruise. A welt. A limp.

                              So far this season, that's all Stephane Yelle, Blake Sloan, Robyn
                             Regehr or any other NHLer had to show for fearlessly placing their
                             body in the path of a frozen hunk of rubber hurtling at 160 km/h.

                              Thanks to an independent arbitrator's decision this week, however,
                             they'll soon receive statistical recognition for their black-and-blue
                             bravado.

                              On Friday, arbitrator Joan Parker ordered the NHL to resume the
                             tabulation of blocked shots, as well as hits, takeaways and
                             giveaways. Those categories were official stats for five years until
                             the league opted before the current campaign to discontinue their
                             use, which prompted the NHL Players' Association to file a
                             grievance.

                              League officials argued the stats were dropped because they
                             weren't being uniformly applied in the league's 30 buildings but the
                             NHLPA claimed the brass was trying to deprive players of
                             ammunition in contract negotiations.

                              Flames blueliner Denis Gauthier, who hits opponents with far more
                             regularity than the back of the net, is one of the players who stands
                             to benefit from the rehabilitation of the stats categories.

                              "What else do I have?" rhetorically asked Gauthier, who went into
                             last night's contest with 38 points in 277 career games. "Those are
                             stats that I rely on and basically my whole career revolves around.

                              "It's good to know I'll still be looked after and I won't need to come
                             to the bargaining table with 10 points and say 'I want x-amount of
                             dollars.' I've got something to base it on. Blocked shots and hits are
                             my strengths along with plus-minus."

                              Blueline mate Bob Boughner, who is also an NHLPA
                             vice-president, says the league's grunts need all the help they can
                             get at salary arbitration hearings or the negotiation table.

                              "When it gets down to it," noted Boughner, who has 52 points in
                             501 games, "and you've got lawyers and arbitrators in the room, it's
                             stats -- they look at numbers. (The hit total) is a pretty important
                             number for guys who aren't in that goalscoring category."

                              It's not all good news for bruising blueliners, of course. The
                             revamped stat sheets will once again scream to the world all those
                             occasions when a player turns the puck over to the opposition.

                              "You've got to take the good with the bad," laughed Boughner.
                             "You're out there every night and most fans know and scouts and
                             GMs and everybody else who's watching knows. If you're giving the
                             puck away all night, you're at fault and you should probably suffer
                             the consequences in the stats."

                              The most contentious category has always been the hit, with
                             officials in certain buildings notoriously generous or miserly in
                             distributing statistical credit for body contact.

                              "Make it close," pleaded Gauthier, who has long argued Calgary
                             hitters are judged more severely than boppers in, for instance,
                             Florida. "Give these guys guidelines -- you've got to separate a guy
                             from the puck or finish a check after he's made a pass. Just make
                             sure that's it clear and everybody's doing the same thing."

                              "There definitely should be some kind of training," remarked
                             Boughner, "to make sure everybody is on the same page every
                             night.

                              "Even though we think it's an important stat, you don't want to see
                             it varying. In one place you could get 10 hits and then you'd play
                             the same way and you'd get two in another place.

                              "I don't know what the actual rule is but I've seen guys have
                             highlight-reel hits in the middle of the ice -- centre-ice, open-ice hits
                             -- and never got credit for it because their team didn't gain
                             possession of the puck. That's pretty dumb, I think. Everybody has
                             to use their head a little more and recognize what a good
                             bodycheck is."

                              In handing down her decision, Parker not only ordered the stats be
                             reinstituted "forthwith" -- in other words, immediately -- she decreed
                             that league and players' association officials meet to determine a
                             methodology for retroactively crediting stats for the season to date.

    • Herb Garbutt
      Good news indeed. It s funny that she s making the NHL go back and do them from the start of the year. That means somebody s going to have to go through 600+
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
        Good news indeed. It's funny that she's making the NHL go back and do them from the start of the year. That means somebody's going to have to go through 600+ games and do the stats. Maybe that's the way it should be done anyway, have one person watching the tape and compiling the stats (of course, they're likely to miss quite a few hits as guys finish checks with the puck moving up the ice).

        This is so unlike the NHL to shoot itself in the foot like this.

        They have meeting with officials and send out videos for the October/November obstruction crackdown. Why can't they do the same with off-ice officials. Send them tapes--this is a hit, this is not a hit.

        Herb

        "D. Atkinson" wrote:

        Of course, the NHL was forced to do it....they're too stupid to do things
        like this on their own. Everyone on this list should send Parker a thank you note.

                                Decision a hit
                               League to resume counting 'secondary' stats

                               By JEAN LEFEBVRE -- Calgary Sun

                                A bruise. A welt. A limp.

                                So far this season, that's all Stephane Yelle, Blake Sloan, Robyn
                               Regehr or any other NHLer had to show for fearlessly placing their
                               body in the path of a frozen hunk of rubber hurtling at 160 km/h.

                                Thanks to an independent arbitrator's decision this week, however,
                               they'll soon receive statistical recognition for their black-and-blue
                               bravado.

                                On Friday, arbitrator Joan Parker ordered the NHL to resume the
                               tabulation of blocked shots, as well as hits, takeaways and
                               giveaways. Those categories were official stats for five years until
                               the league opted before the current campaign to discontinue their
                               use, which prompted the NHL Players' Association to file a
                               grievance.

                                League officials argued the stats were dropped because they
                               weren't being uniformly applied in the league's 30 buildings but the
                               NHLPA claimed the brass was trying to deprive players of
                               ammunition in contract negotiations.

                                Flames blueliner Denis Gauthier, who hits opponents with far more
                               regularity than the back of the net, is one of the players who stands
                               to benefit from the rehabilitation of the stats categories.

                                "What else do I have?" rhetorically asked Gauthier, who went into
                               last night's contest with 38 points in 277 career games. "Those are
                               stats that I rely on and basically my whole career revolves around.

                                "It's good to know I'll still be looked after and I won't need to come
                               to the bargaining table with 10 points and say 'I want x-amount of
                               dollars.' I've got something to base it on. Blocked shots and hits are
                               my strengths along with plus-minus."

                                Blueline mate Bob Boughner, who is also an NHLPA
                               vice-president, says the league's grunts need all the help they can
                               get at salary arbitration hearings or the negotiation table.

                                "When it gets down to it," noted Boughner, who has 52 points in
                               501 games, "and you've got lawyers and arbitrators in the room, it's
                               stats -- they look at numbers. (The hit total) is a pretty important
                               number for guys who aren't in that goalscoring category."

                                It's not all good news for bruising blueliners, of course. The
                               revamped stat sheets will once again scream to the world all those
                               occasions when a player turns the puck over to the opposition.

                                "You've got to take the good with the bad," laughed Boughner.
                               "You're out there every night and most fans know and scouts and
                               GMs and everybody else who's watching knows. If you're giving the
                               puck away all night, you're at fault and you should probably suffer
                               the consequences in the stats."

                                The most contentious category has always been the hit, with
                               officials in certain buildings notoriously generous or miserly in
                               distributing statistical credit for body contact.

                                "Make it close," pleaded Gauthier, who has long argued Calgary
                               hitters are judged more severely than boppers in, for instance,
                               Florida. "Give these guys guidelines -- you've got to separate a guy
                               from the puck or finish a check after he's made a pass. Just make
                               sure that's it clear and everybody's doing the same thing."

                                "There definitely should be some kind of training," remarked
                               Boughner, "to make sure everybody is on the same page every
                               night.

                                "Even though we think it's an important stat, you don't want to see
                               it varying. In one place you could get 10 hits and then you'd play
                               the same way and you'd get two in another place.

                                "I don't know what the actual rule is but I've seen guys have
                               highlight-reel hits in the middle of the ice -- centre-ice, open-ice hits
                               -- and never got credit for it because their team didn't gain
                               possession of the puck. That's pretty dumb, I think. Everybody has
                               to use their head a little more and recognize what a good
                               bodycheck is."

                                In handing down her decision, Parker not only ordered the stats be
                               reinstituted "forthwith" -- in other words, immediately -- she decreed
                               that league and players' association officials meet to determine a
                               methodology for retroactively crediting stats for the season to date.

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

      • Brett Hall
        Certainly a good thing, although I m not sure how they will determine a methodology for retroactively crediting stats for the season to date . I know some
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
          Certainly a good thing, although I'm not sure how they will 'determine a
          methodology for retroactively crediting stats for the season to date'.

          I know some statisticians were still tracking hits, as they still show up in
          some of the game logs this year.

          Regardless of the inconsistencies, the stats are useful if you keep them in
          context by team.

          --
          Brett Hall
          http://www.puckage.com
        • Larry Fletcher
          The NHL s decision to discontinue these stats was 100% self serving. It will only frustrate anyone who tries to make sense of the league s decision. There is
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
            The NHL's decision to discontinue these stats was 100% self serving.  It will only
            frustrate anyone who tries to make sense of the league's decision.  There is no
            sense to it other than the NHL administrators and owners serving their own interests.
            Thank goodness for arbitration!! 
             
            Larry Fletcher
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2003 4:19 PM
            Subject: [hockeydisk] good thing

            Of course, the NHL was forced to do it....they're too stupid to do things
            like this on their own. Everyone on this list should send Parker a thank you note.

                                    Decision a hit
                                   League to resume counting 'secondary' stats

                                   By JEAN LEFEBVRE -- Calgary Sun

                                    A bruise. A welt. A limp.

                                    So far this season, that's all Stephane Yelle, Blake Sloan, Robyn
                                   Regehr or any other NHLer had to show for fearlessly placing their
                                   body in the path of a frozen hunk of rubber hurtling at 160 km/h.

                                    Thanks to an independent arbitrator's decision this week, however,
                                   they'll soon receive statistical recognition for their black-and-blue
                                   bravado.

                                    On Friday, arbitrator Joan Parker ordered the NHL to resume the
                                   tabulation of blocked shots, as well as hits, takeaways and
                                   giveaways. Those categories were official stats for five years until
                                   the league opted before the current campaign to discontinue their
                                   use, which prompted the NHL Players' Association to file a
                                   grievance.

                                    League officials argued the stats were dropped because they
                                   weren't being uniformly applied in the league's 30 buildings but the
                                   NHLPA claimed the brass was trying to deprive players of
                                   ammunition in contract negotiations.

                                    Flames blueliner Denis Gauthier, who hits opponents with far more
                                   regularity than the back of the net, is one of the players who stands
                                   to benefit from the rehabilitation of the stats categories.

                                    "What else do I have?" rhetorically asked Gauthier, who went into
                                   last night's contest with 38 points in 277 career games. "Those are
                                   stats that I rely on and basically my whole career revolves around.

                                    "It's good to know I'll still be looked after and I won't need to come
                                   to the bargaining table with 10 points and say 'I want x-amount of
                                   dollars.' I've got something to base it on. Blocked shots and hits are
                                   my strengths along with plus-minus."

                                    Blueline mate Bob Boughner, who is also an NHLPA
                                   vice-president, says the league's grunts need all the help they can
                                   get at salary arbitration hearings or the negotiation table.

                                    "When it gets down to it," noted Boughner, who has 52 points in
                                   501 games, "and you've got lawyers and arbitrators in the room, it's
                                   stats -- they look at numbers. (The hit total) is a pretty important
                                   number for guys who aren't in that goalscoring category."

                                    It's not all good news for bruising blueliners, of course. The
                                   revamped stat sheets will once again scream to the world all those
                                   occasions when a player turns the puck over to the opposition.

                                    "You've got to take the good with the bad," laughed Boughner.
                                   "You're out there every night and most fans know and scouts and
                                   GMs and everybody else who's watching knows. If you're giving the
                                   puck away all night, you're at fault and you should probably suffer
                                   the consequences in the stats."

                                    The most contentious category has always been the hit, with
                                   officials in certain buildings notoriously generous or miserly in
                                   distributing statistical credit for body contact.

                                    "Make it close," pleaded Gauthier, who has long argued Calgary
                                   hitters are judged more severely than boppers in, for instance,
                                   Florida. "Give these guys guidelines -- you've got to separate a guy
                                   from the puck or finish a check after he's made a pass. Just make
                                   sure that's it clear and everybody's doing the same thing."

                                    "There definitely should be some kind of training," remarked
                                   Boughner, "to make sure everybody is on the same page every
                                   night.

                                    "Even though we think it's an important stat, you don't want to see
                                   it varying. In one place you could get 10 hits and then you'd play
                                   the same way and you'd get two in another place.

                                    "I don't know what the actual rule is but I've seen guys have
                                   highlight-reel hits in the middle of the ice -- centre-ice, open-ice hits
                                   -- and never got credit for it because their team didn't gain
                                   possession of the puck. That's pretty dumb, I think. Everybody has
                                   to use their head a little more and recognize what a good
                                   bodycheck is."

                                    In handing down her decision, Parker not only ordered the stats be
                                   reinstituted "forthwith" -- in other words, immediately -- she decreed
                                   that league and players' association officials meet to determine a
                                   methodology for retroactively crediting stats for the season to date.

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

          • Herb Garbutt
            It s doubtful that stats kept by NHLPA-hired statisticians would have held up in an arbitration case, especially not being recognized as official NHL stats.
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
              It's doubtful that stats kept by NHLPA-hired statisticians would have held up in an arbitration case, especially not being recognized as official NHL stats. I'm sure it would have made it a lot easier to do the retroactive stats for the NHL but when has the NHLPA ever done anything to make something easier for the NHL....or vice versa.

              Herb

              Derek Chaiken wrote:

              The NHLPA isn't totally innocent on this one.  With the players large salaries, why didn't they hire statisticans for each game?Companies directed by athletes can be awfully stupid sometimes.Derek Chaiken
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2003 8:39 PM
              Subject: Re: [hockeydisk] good thing
               The NHL's decision to discontinue these stats was 100% self serving.  It will onlyfrustrate anyone who tries to make sense of the league's decision.  There is nosense to it other than the NHL administrators and owners serving their own interests.Thank goodness for arbitration!! Larry Fletcher
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2003 4:19 PM
              Subject: [hockeydisk] good thing
               Of course, the NHL was forced to do it....they're too stupid to do things
              like this on their own. Everyone on this list should send Parker a thank you note.

                                      Decision a hit
                                     League to resume counting 'secondary' stats

                                     By JEAN LEFEBVRE -- Calgary Sun

                                      A bruise. A welt. A limp.

                                      So far this season, that's all Stephane Yelle, Blake Sloan, Robyn
                                     Regehr or any other NHLer had to show for fearlessly placing their
                                     body in the path of a frozen hunk of rubber hurtling at 160 km/h.

                                      Thanks to an independent arbitrator's decision this week, however,
                                     they'll soon receive statistical recognition for their black-and-blue
                                     bravado.

                                      On Friday, arbitrator Joan Parker ordered the NHL to resume the
                                     tabulation of blocked shots, as well as hits, takeaways and
                                     giveaways. Those categories were official stats for five years until
                                     the league opted before the current campaign to discontinue their
                                     use, which prompted the NHL Players' Association to file a
                                     grievance.

                                      League officials argued the stats were dropped because they
                                     weren't being uniformly applied in the league's 30 buildings but the
                                     NHLPA claimed the brass was trying to deprive players of
                                     ammunition in contract negotiations.

                                      Flames blueliner Denis Gauthier, who hits opponents with far more
                                     regularity than the back of the net, is one of the players who stands
                                     to benefit from the rehabilitation of the stats categories.

                                      "What else do I have?" rhetorically asked Gauthier, who went into
                                     last night's contest with 38 points in 277 career games. "Those are
                                     stats that I rely on and basically my whole career revolves around.

                                      "It's good to know I'll still be looked after and I won't need to come
                                     to the bargaining table with 10 points and say 'I want x-amount of
                                     dollars.' I've got something to base it on. Blocked shots and hits are
                                     my strengths along with plus-minus."

                                      Blueline mate Bob Boughner, who is also an NHLPA
                                     vice-president, says the league's grunts need all the help they can
                                     get at salary arbitration hearings or the negotiation table.

                                      "When it gets down to it," noted Boughner, who has 52 points in
                                     501 games, "and you've got lawyers and arbitrators in the room, it's
                                     stats -- they look at numbers. (The hit total) is a pretty important
                                     number for guys who aren't in that goalscoring category."

                                      It's not all good news for bruising blueliners, of course. The
                                     revamped stat sheets will once again scream to the world all those
                                     occasions when a player turns the puck over to the opposition.

                                      "You've got to take the good with the bad," laughed Boughner.
                                     "You're out there every night and most fans know and scouts and
                                     GMs and everybody else who's watching knows. If you're giving the
                                     puck away all night, you're at fault and you should probably suffer
                                     the consequences in the stats."

                                      The most contentious category has always been the hit, with
                                     officials in certain buildings notoriously generous or miserly in
                                     distributing statistical credit for body contact.

                                      "Make it close," pleaded Gauthier, who has long argued Calgary
                                     hitters are judged more severely than boppers in, for instance,
                                     Florida. "Give these guys guidelines -- you've got to separate a guy
                                     from the puck or finish a check after he's made a pass. Just make
                                     sure that's it clear and everybody's doing the same thing."

                                      "There definitely should be some kind of training," remarked
                                     Boughner, "to make sure everybody is on the same page every
                                     night.

                                      "Even though we think it's an important stat, you don't want to see
                                     it varying. In one place you could get 10 hits and then you'd play
                                     the same way and you'd get two in another place.

                                      "I don't know what the actual rule is but I've seen guys have
                                     highlight-reel hits in the middle of the ice -- centre-ice, open-ice hits
                                     -- and never got credit for it because their team didn't gain
                                     possession of the puck. That's pretty dumb, I think. Everybody has
                                     to use their head a little more and recognize what a good
                                     bodycheck is."

                                      In handing down her decision, Parker not only ordered the stats be
                                     reinstituted "forthwith" -- in other words, immediately -- she decreed
                                     that league and players' association officials meet to determine a
                                     methodology for retroactively crediting stats for the season to date.

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

            • D. Atkinson
              ... I hope this is sarcasm.....the NHL consistently shoots at its own feet with guns in both hands and a blowgun in its mouth. Of the major sports, the NHL is
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
                Herb Garbutt wrote:

                > This is so unlike the NHL to shoot itself in the foot like this.

                I hope this is sarcasm.....the NHL consistently shoots at its own feet
                with guns in both hands and a blowgun in its mouth. Of the major
                sports, the NHL is by far the most clueless. They should have been
                tracking these stats 20 years ago, and never stopped this year.
                Advanced stats packages are the staples of the other sports, especially
                baseball, and they keep the rabid fans happy and interested. The
                NHL is decades behind.

                Dave
              • D. Atkinson
                ... I heard that a couple of guys in suits went into the local Modell s sporting goods stores and bought every dartboard in stock. :)
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
                  Brett Hall wrote:

                  > Certainly a good thing, although I'm not sure how they will 'determine a
                  > methodology for retroactively crediting stats for the season to date'.

                  I heard that a couple of guys in suits went into the local Modell's
                  sporting goods stores and bought every dartboard in stock. :)
                • D. Atkinson
                  ... I don t agree.....if the NHLPA hired a stats service like Stats, Inc., there would be quality control measures and the like in place that a court would go
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
                    Herb Garbutt wrote:

                    > It's doubtful that stats kept by NHLPA-hired statisticians would have held up in an arbitration case, especially not
                    > being recognized as official NHL stats. I'm sure it would have made it a lot easier to do the retroactive stats for
                    > the NHL but when has the NHLPA ever done anything to make something easier for the NHL....or vice versa.
                    >
                    > Herb
                    >

                    I don't agree.....if the NHLPA hired a stats service like Stats, Inc., there
                    would be quality control measures and the like in place that a court would
                    go with the numbers. In fact, I think an outside service would do a better
                    job than the NHL....just look at how many times they changed their database
                    system on nhl.com...just about every year, because they were essentially
                    clueless.
                  • Brett Hall
                    Heh, well at least that way the odds are against Robert Svehla being credited with nearly 400 hits again. Unless, of course, Robert Svehla s area is the wall
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
                      Heh, well at least that way the odds are against Robert Svehla being
                      credited with nearly 400 hits again. Unless, of course, Robert Svehla's
                      area is the wall and Willie O'Ree is doing the throwing.

                      Sorry Willie. ;-)

                      --
                      Brett Hall
                      http://www.puckage.com


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "D. Atkinson" <bigdog@...>
                      To: <hockeydisk@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2003 10:02 PM
                      Subject: Re: [hockeydisk] good thing


                      > I heard that a couple of guys in suits went into the local Modell's
                      > sporting goods stores and bought every dartboard in stock. :)
                    • Herb Garbutt
                      It was dripping in so much sarcasm that I was treading as I typed it. Herb ... ADVERTISEMENT [HGTV Dream Home Giveaway]
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jan 19, 2003
                        It was dripping in so much sarcasm that I was treading as I typed it.

                        Herb

                        "D. Atkinson" wrote:

                         Herb Garbutt wrote:

                        > This is so unlike the NHL to shoot itself in the foot like this.

                        I hope this is sarcasm.....the NHL consistently shoots at its own feet
                        with guns in both hands and a blowgun in its mouth. Of the major
                        sports, the NHL is by far the most clueless. They should have been
                        tracking these stats 20 years ago, and never stopped this year.
                        Advanced stats packages are the staples of the other sports, especially
                        baseball, and they keep the rabid fans happy and interested. The
                        NHL is decades behind.

                                             Dave
                         
                         


                        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

                      • Brad Utterstrom <butters@st1.wou.edu>
                        I actually have an idea that would spread out the bias for hitting and, overall, all teams would be rated more or less the same. Here s my idea: Each team has
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jan 31, 2003
                          I actually have an idea that would spread out the bias for hitting
                          and, overall, all teams would be rated more or less the same.

                          Here's my idea: Each team has a statistician that will work all
                          games. This means he'd have to travel with the team. Each team's
                          statistician for hitting is only responsible for calculating the hits
                          for the OTHER team.

                          This way, since you've got a guy who will give out way too many hits
                          and a guy who'll be way too stingy, rather than them doing the stats
                          for so many games for one team (which really screws up the statistic)
                          his personal bias will be more or less spread throughout the league
                          evenly. End result is that all players should get a fair shake. It's
                          not a perfect plan, but it's a heck of a lot better than what they're
                          doing now.-Brad

                          --- In hockeydisk@yahoogroups.com, "D. Atkinson" <bigdog@s...> wrote:
                          >
                        • Derrick Underwood
                          I just read a transcript of Bettman s state of the game address, and he revealed that we won t be seeing those extra stats after all...
                          Message 12 of 12 , Feb 1, 2003
                            I just read a transcript of Bettman's state of the game address, and he
                            revealed that we won't be seeing those extra stats after all...

                            <<In other issues, Bettman revealed the NHL has no plans to return
                            statistics like hits and blocked shots to official box scores. An
                            independent arbitrator last month sided with the NHLPA and ordered the
                            league to restore the statistics.

                            While the NHL will furnish them to the union, the statistics will not be
                            made available to the public.

                            "We have no confidence in those statistics," Bettman said. "That's why we
                            stopped using them to begin with. We don't believe they accurately reflect
                            performance.">>

                            Derrick



                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: Brad Utterstrom <butters@...> [mailto:butters@...]
                            Sent: January 31, 2003 4:48 AM
                            To: hockeydisk@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [hockeydisk] Re: good thing


                            I actually have an idea that would spread out the bias for hitting
                            and, overall, all teams would be rated more or less the same.

                            Here's my idea: Each team has a statistician that will work all
                            games. This means he'd have to travel with the team. Each team's
                            statistician for hitting is only responsible for calculating the hits
                            for the OTHER team.

                            This way, since you've got a guy who will give out way too many hits
                            and a guy who'll be way too stingy, rather than them doing the stats
                            for so many games for one team (which really screws up the statistic)
                            his personal bias will be more or less spread throughout the league
                            evenly. End result is that all players should get a fair shake. It's
                            not a perfect plan, but it's a heck of a lot better than what they're
                            doing now.-Brad

                            --- In hockeydisk@yahoogroups.com, "D. Atkinson" <bigdog@s...> wrote:
                            >




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