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Minimum size vehicle for towing?

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  • mtrob_326
    I m considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep on a trailer and ramp-launch. I don t currently have a vehicle to tow it, so I m interested in
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 13, 2003
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      I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep on a
      trailer and ramp-launch. I don't currently have a vehicle to tow it,
      so I'm interested in recommendations for minimum size (6 cyl vs. 8,
      truck size, etc.) for towing. I'll typically be towing it no more
      than 5 miles each way, but occasionally will want to travel farther,
      maybe 40 miles each way. Thanks for your help!

      Mark
    • tomturnwood@aol.com
      I have a 4-runner six cylinder with which I have pulled my Hobie33. It will do for short halls. Unless you have an automatic winch, I would not advise keeping
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 13, 2003
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        I have a 4-runner six cylinder with which I have pulled my Hobie33. It will
        do for short halls. Unless you have an automatic winch, I would not advise
        keeping the Hobie on a trailer and launching each time, as cranking the winch is
        labor intensive and not at all pleasant.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • exliberal
        I tow our Hobie with a Ford F-250 Heavy Duty 4x4 Diesel pickup. Overkill? Hell, yes. Enough overkill? Hell, no. The Hobie and trailer weigh in at around
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 13, 2003
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          I tow our Hobie with a Ford F-250 Heavy Duty 4x4 Diesel pickup.
          Overkill? Hell, yes. Enough overkill? Hell, no.

          The Hobie and trailer weigh in at around 7,500 pounds. Add another
          2,000+ pounds for the driver, passengers, fuel, and assorted boat and
          truck stuff and you have a load that will stress a very capable
          pickup. In perfect conditions, almost any vehicle could drag the
          boat up to speed and then bring it to a stop eventually -- in PERFECT
          conditions. In a panic stop, the physics of trying to control 13,500
          pounds of truck, trailer and boat are truly fearsome.

          If the tow vehicle and boat get wrapped around a bridge abutment –
          or, God forbid - a mommy-missle full of kids, the police will put the
          pieces on a scale. If they exceed the rating of the tow vehicle;
          *You*Were*Negligent.* That could mean the invalidation of your
          insurance, shitpots of lawyers, and even a vacation with Bubba. It
          doesn't really matter if you were doing 20 a mile from the ramp or 75
          on the way to Nationals.

          We are all charged with seamanship on the water – it should be no
          different on land.

          So, buy a capable vehicle! Buy older if you have to. I've towed RVs
          and boats for many years; if you have any questions, e-mail me
          at "ExLiberal at AOL dot Com." (I hope that fools the Spam-Bots.)

          Fair seas -- and open roads.

          Dan
          Flying Tiger


          --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
          > I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep on a
          > trailer and ramp-launch. I don't currently have a vehicle to tow
          it,
          > so I'm interested in recommendations for minimum size (6 cyl vs. 8,
          > truck size, etc.) for towing. I'll typically be towing it no more
          > than 5 miles each way, but occasionally will want to travel
          farther,
          > maybe 40 miles each way. Thanks for your help!
          >
          > Mark
        • bstevens
          Hi Dan, Thanks for the information. I have a Ford Econoline, E250, that is rated to for this towing load from the factory. I remember that I felt it s spec s
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 14, 2003
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            Hi Dan,
            Thanks for the information.
            I have a Ford Econoline, E250, that is rated to for this towing load
            from the factory. I remember that I felt it's spec's were adequate for
            towing my Hobie but when it will be replaced with onw that has a bit
            more capability.
            I haven't had a problem but I know the transmission is rarely able to
            get into top gear.
            At about 80K miles the transmission's front pump and tourque converter
            had to be replaced.
            I was at the local launch ramp recently when a man with a small pickup
            wasn't able to pull his 26' water ballasted sailboat out of the water. I
            volunteered to help and was able to pull his dead truck, his boat and
            him up the ramp without any problem, but towing my Hobie down the road
            is close to my limit.
            Scheherezade

            -----Original Message-----
            From: exliberal [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
            Sent: Sunday, July 13, 2003 9:10 AM
            To: hobie33@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Hobie33] Re: Minimum size vehicle for towing?


            I tow our Hobie with a Ford F-250 Heavy Duty 4x4 Diesel pickup.
            Overkill? Hell, yes. Enough overkill? Hell, no.

            The Hobie and trailer weigh in at around 7,500 pounds. Add another
            2,000+ pounds for the driver, passengers, fuel, and assorted boat and
            truck stuff and you have a load that will stress a very capable
            pickup. In perfect conditions, almost any vehicle could drag the
            boat up to speed and then bring it to a stop eventually -- in PERFECT
            conditions. In a panic stop, the physics of trying to control 13,500
            pounds of truck, trailer and boat are truly fearsome.

            If the tow vehicle and boat get wrapped around a bridge abutment -
            or, God forbid - a mommy-missle full of kids, the police will put the
            pieces on a scale. If they exceed the rating of the tow vehicle;
            *You*Were*Negligent.* That could mean the invalidation of your
            insurance, shitpots of lawyers, and even a vacation with Bubba. It
            doesn't really matter if you were doing 20 a mile from the ramp or 75
            on the way to Nationals.

            We are all charged with seamanship on the water - it should be no
            different on land.

            So, buy a capable vehicle! Buy older if you have to. I've towed RVs
            and boats for many years; if you have any questions, e-mail me
            at "ExLiberal at AOL dot Com." (I hope that fools the Spam-Bots.)

            Fair seas -- and open roads.

            Dan
            Flying Tiger


            --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
            > I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep on a
            > trailer and ramp-launch. I don't currently have a vehicle to tow
            it,
            > so I'm interested in recommendations for minimum size (6 cyl vs. 8,
            > truck size, etc.) for towing. I'll typically be towing it no more
            > than 5 miles each way, but occasionally will want to travel
            farther,
            > maybe 40 miles each way. Thanks for your help!
            >
            > Mark



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          • mtrob_326
            Dan, Thanks for the info re: a towing vehicle, etc. for a Hobie 33. I m about to step into somewhat new territory by switching from an in-the- water boat to a
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 14, 2003
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              Dan,

              Thanks for the info re: a towing vehicle, etc. for a Hobie 33. I'm
              about to step into somewhat new territory by switching from an in-the-
              water boat to a trailerable one, so any advice is appreciated.

              My intent is to keep the boat on a trailer at a boatyard here in
              SoCal, preferably with the mast up, then tow it around to the launch
              ramp when needed. My goal is to then be able to launch the boat and
              be ready to go within 1/2 hour. Does this seem reasonable? Since
              I'll be launching every time I use it (1 - 3 times per month), should
              I consider an electric winch essential?

              I'll also be buying a truck to do the towing. I don't intend to use
              the truck other than for towing the boat (usually short-range) and
              the occasional trip to Home Depot, so I just need a vehicle that's
              capable and mechanically sound. I won't be putting on many miles per
              year, so it seems that I should be OK with a somewhat higher-mileage
              truck with a tow package. Have you been pretty pleased with your
              F250? Other than fuel costs, do you have an opinion re: gas vs.
              diesel?

              Thanks for the help. I'm looking forward to "trading up" (racing-
              wise) my Catalina 30 to a higher-performance boat!

              Mark


              --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, exliberal <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              >
              > I tow our Hobie with a Ford F-250 Heavy Duty 4x4 Diesel pickup.
              > Overkill? Hell, yes. Enough overkill? Hell, no.
              >
              > The Hobie and trailer weigh in at around 7,500 pounds. Add another
              > 2,000+ pounds for the driver, passengers, fuel, and assorted boat
              and
              > truck stuff and you have a load that will stress a very capable
              > pickup. In perfect conditions, almost any vehicle could drag the
              > boat up to speed and then bring it to a stop eventually -- in
              PERFECT
              > conditions. In a panic stop, the physics of trying to control
              13,500
              > pounds of truck, trailer and boat are truly fearsome.
              >
              > If the tow vehicle and boat get wrapped around a bridge abutment –
              > or, God forbid - a mommy-missle full of kids, the police will put
              the
              > pieces on a scale. If they exceed the rating of the tow vehicle;
              > *You*Were*Negligent.* That could mean the invalidation of your
              > insurance, shitpots of lawyers, and even a vacation with Bubba. It
              > doesn't really matter if you were doing 20 a mile from the ramp or
              75
              > on the way to Nationals.
              >
              > We are all charged with seamanship on the water – it should be no
              > different on land.
              >
              > So, buy a capable vehicle! Buy older if you have to. I've towed
              RVs
              > and boats for many years; if you have any questions, e-mail me
              > at "ExLiberal at AOL dot Com." (I hope that fools the Spam-Bots.)
              >
              > Fair seas -- and open roads.
              >
              > Dan
              > Flying Tiger
              >
              >
              > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
              > > I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep on a
              > > trailer and ramp-launch. I don't currently have a vehicle to tow
              > it,
              > > so I'm interested in recommendations for minimum size (6 cyl vs.
              8,
              > > truck size, etc.) for towing. I'll typically be towing it no
              more
              > > than 5 miles each way, but occasionally will want to travel
              > farther,
              > > maybe 40 miles each way. Thanks for your help!
              > >
              > > Mark
            • christiansch
              we launch about twice a week since 1998 (= several 100 times) and lower and raise our keel with this http://www.superwinch.com/products/winches/xseries/x1.html
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 14, 2003
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                we launch about twice a week since 1998 (= several 100 times) and
                lower and raise our keel with this
                http://www.superwinch.com/products/winches/xseries/x1.html

                If you don't launch too often man-power is just fine and will keep
                you extra fit.
                Don't use an e-winch with only 1500 lbs capacity. Done that (no
                good). Our half size battery manages at least 3 hoists and enough
                juice for our instruments for the racing days.
                Very important: Make sure you marked how high you can safely hoist
                your keel. If some moron goes too high and the cable snaps, you
                would not be the first to sink your H33. The keel will crash right
                trough the bottom of your boat and the rest is left to your
                imagination.
                Change your 1/4" cable when you detect meat-hooks. It is easy and
                may cost you 5 or 10 bucks, the alternative is again left to your
                imagination.
                The extra time to take the keel-bolts off and hoist your keel is
                about 5 minutes. During this time your efficient crew gets the boat
                ready. Compare all that to clean bottom every 10 days and a
                painting once a year.
                We never use the guide post (not even for road-transportation). We
                have 4x4 blocks upright under the lifted forward and aft end of the
                keel sitting on the keel-well. The forward end of the keel is just
                tied to the mast-post. If we go on the road the forward end of the
                keel is secured against sideways motion with a line attached to the
                chainplate rods under deck. The aft end of the keel is just locked
                by placing a flat wooden board on each side between the well and
                keel. It is the method KISS but after 15000 m on the road and
                several hundred lifts, it seem to work for us. Our tow-vehicle is
                the same as Broomstick's. At home we keep MIRAGE parked 500 ft from
                the ramp and leave the rudder in place. Hope this helps.

                Christian
                Mirage 3113

                --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                > I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep on a
                > trailer and ramp-launch.
              • exliberal
                Sorry for the prior rant. My wife believes that one fine day I ll break both legs falling off my soapbox. What I was trying to say is that it is a very good
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 14, 2003
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                  Sorry for the prior rant. My wife believes that one fine day I'll
                  break both legs falling off my soapbox.

                  What I was trying to say is that it is a very good idea to follow the
                  vehicle tow ratings. Those ratings are the manufacture's best,
                  reasoned, engineered estimations of what their vehicle can safely
                  tow. The ratings are probably not overly conservative as the truck
                  manufactures are in a constant propaganda battle with their
                  competitors.

                  Go to your library and get the Trailer Life issue devoted to tow
                  vehicles. That issue contains an excellent tutorial on what all the
                  different ratings mean. You can research an older truck by picking
                  up the issue from the applicable year.

                  As for a new truck recommendation: How I wish I was in your shoes!
                  My 1990 has to last quite a few more years before I get to go truck
                  shopping again! All of the domestic manufactures are turning out
                  truly exceptional products. Yes, I'm partial to Fords and diesels,
                  but that wouldn't stop me from looking at the whole gamut!

                  Couple of things: IMNSHO, buy used and buy capability. Here in Low-
                  Cal I see a lot of great trucks for sale that have never been used
                  for anything except hauling groceries. One of those creampuffs will
                  go for a fraction of what a new truck will. Buy big (big engine, big
                  brakes, big wheels, big tow rating.) You'll be comfortable and safe
                  and surprised at how little cost differential there is between a used
                  F-150, 250 and 350. Buy one with the options (better resale value)
                  and put a Class V hitch on her. I own a 4x4 – wouldn't buy one for
                  towing – too big of a turning radius. However, there is that new
                  Chevy with four wheel steering…

                  Now for the fun stuff: Our Hobie has a fixed keel. We keep it 40
                  feet away from the crane with the mast up. And it still takes two
                  men the better part of an hour to launch her. We're are getting
                  better with practice but – I find myself longing for the days of
                  throwing the lines over the side and going sailing. I have to keep
                  repeating my mantra of fouling, bottom paint, electrolysis, through
                  hulls, blisters, and etc, etc, etc….………

                  BTW: I have fond memories of a Cat 30 Tall Rig that kept me from my
                  college studies. Wonderful boat -- and PHRF rating.

                  Dan



                  --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                  > Dan,
                  >
                  > Thanks for the info re: a towing vehicle, etc. for a Hobie 33. I'm
                  > about to step into somewhat new territory by switching from an in-
                  the-
                  > water boat to a trailerable one, so any advice is appreciated.
                  >
                  > My intent is to keep the boat on a trailer at a boatyard here in
                  > SoCal, preferably with the mast up, then tow it around to the
                  launch
                  > ramp when needed. My goal is to then be able to launch the boat
                  and
                  > be ready to go within 1/2 hour. Does this seem reasonable? Since
                  > I'll be launching every time I use it (1 - 3 times per month),
                  should
                  > I consider an electric winch essential?
                  >
                  > I'll also be buying a truck to do the towing. I don't intend to
                  use
                  > the truck other than for towing the boat (usually short-range) and
                  > the occasional trip to Home Depot, so I just need a vehicle that's
                  > capable and mechanically sound. I won't be putting on many miles
                  per
                  > year, so it seems that I should be OK with a somewhat higher-
                  mileage
                  > truck with a tow package. Have you been pretty pleased with your
                  > F250? Other than fuel costs, do you have an opinion re: gas vs.
                  > diesel?
                  >
                  > Thanks for the help. I'm looking forward to "trading up" (racing-
                  > wise) my Catalina 30 to a higher-performance boat!
                  >
                  > Mark
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, exliberal <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I tow our Hobie with a Ford F-250 Heavy Duty 4x4 Diesel pickup.
                  > > Overkill? Hell, yes. Enough overkill? Hell, no.
                  > >
                  > > The Hobie and trailer weigh in at around 7,500 pounds. Add
                  another
                  > > 2,000+ pounds for the driver, passengers, fuel, and assorted boat
                  > and
                  > > truck stuff and you have a load that will stress a very capable
                  > > pickup. In perfect conditions, almost any vehicle could drag the
                  > > boat up to speed and then bring it to a stop eventually -- in
                  > PERFECT
                  > > conditions. In a panic stop, the physics of trying to control
                  > 13,500
                  > > pounds of truck, trailer and boat are truly fearsome.
                  > >
                  > > If the tow vehicle and boat get wrapped around a bridge abutment –

                  > > or, God forbid - a mommy-missle full of kids, the police will put
                  > the
                  > > pieces on a scale. If they exceed the rating of the tow vehicle;
                  > > *You*Were*Negligent.* That could mean the invalidation of your
                  > > insurance, shitpots of lawyers, and even a vacation with Bubba.
                  It
                  > > doesn't really matter if you were doing 20 a mile from the ramp
                  or
                  > 75
                  > > on the way to Nationals.
                  > >
                  > > We are all charged with seamanship on the water – it should be no
                  > > different on land.
                  > >
                  > > So, buy a capable vehicle! Buy older if you have to. I've towed
                  > RVs
                  > > and boats for many years; if you have any questions, e-mail me
                  > > at "ExLiberal at AOL dot Com." (I hope that fools the Spam-
                  Bots.)
                  > >
                  > > Fair seas -- and open roads.
                  > >
                  > > Dan
                  > > Flying Tiger
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                  > > > I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep on
                  a
                  > > > trailer and ramp-launch. I don't currently have a vehicle to
                  tow
                  > > it,
                  > > > so I'm interested in recommendations for minimum size (6 cyl
                  vs.
                  > 8,
                  > > > truck size, etc.) for towing. I'll typically be towing it no
                  > more
                  > > > than 5 miles each way, but occasionally will want to travel
                  > > farther,
                  > > > maybe 40 miles each way. Thanks for your help!
                  > > >
                  > > > Mark
                • kaosusa41
                  Agree 100%. I have towed my boat across the US in several directions. I started with the old Ford Bronco, large version. This was nuts. The wheel base is a big
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 15, 2003
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                    Agree 100%. I have towed my boat across the US in several directions.
                    I started with the old Ford Bronco, large version. This was nuts. The
                    wheel base is a big factor of stability of the tow vehicle. Every 18
                    wheeler that passed sent me heading for the ditches. Longer wheel
                    base gives you the stability, however you do sacrifice turning
                    radius. I then went to a Chevy Suburban 2500 (larger rated) series.
                    This was a great truck. It had 4x4 and the heavier everything. I used
                    it for many years with no problems. I then bought a new Suburban 1500
                    series in 1996, thought I didn't need the 2500 since I didn't go
                    everywhere with a Hobie 33 behind me. I have had it 7 years and it
                    was a mistake to go with the smaller version. It handles the boat
                    fine. However I have made up for the cost difference many times over
                    with maintenance. I have have to replace wheel bearing and axels
                    several times as the weight takes its toll. I would recommend buying
                    the beefiest used vehicle you can afford.
                    Exliberal has good advise.
                    Good Luck
                    Rich



                    --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, exliberal <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Sorry for the prior rant. My wife believes that one fine day I'll
                    > break both legs falling off my soapbox.
                    >
                    > What I was trying to say is that it is a very good idea to follow
                    the
                    > vehicle tow ratings. Those ratings are the manufacture's best,
                    > reasoned, engineered estimations of what their vehicle can safely
                    > tow. The ratings are probably not overly conservative as the truck
                    > manufactures are in a constant propaganda battle with their
                    > competitors.
                    >
                    > Go to your library and get the Trailer Life issue devoted to tow
                    > vehicles. That issue contains an excellent tutorial on what all
                    the
                    > different ratings mean. You can research an older truck by picking
                    > up the issue from the applicable year.
                    >
                    > As for a new truck recommendation: How I wish I was in your shoes!
                    > My 1990 has to last quite a few more years before I get to go truck
                    > shopping again! All of the domestic manufactures are turning out
                    > truly exceptional products. Yes, I'm partial to Fords and diesels,
                    > but that wouldn't stop me from looking at the whole gamut!
                    >
                    > Couple of things: IMNSHO, buy used and buy capability. Here in Low-
                    > Cal I see a lot of great trucks for sale that have never been used
                    > for anything except hauling groceries. One of those creampuffs
                    will
                    > go for a fraction of what a new truck will. Buy big (big engine,
                    big
                    > brakes, big wheels, big tow rating.) You'll be comfortable and
                    safe
                    > and surprised at how little cost differential there is between a
                    used
                    > F-150, 250 and 350. Buy one with the options (better resale value)
                    > and put a Class V hitch on her. I own a 4x4 – wouldn't buy one for
                    > towing – too big of a turning radius. However, there is that new
                    > Chevy with four wheel steering…
                    >
                    > Now for the fun stuff: Our Hobie has a fixed keel. We keep it 40
                    > feet away from the crane with the mast up. And it still takes two
                    > men the better part of an hour to launch her. We're are getting
                    > better with practice but – I find myself longing for the days of
                    > throwing the lines over the side and going sailing. I have to keep
                    > repeating my mantra of fouling, bottom paint, electrolysis, through
                    > hulls, blisters, and etc, etc, etc….………
                    >
                    > BTW: I have fond memories of a Cat 30 Tall Rig that kept me from my
                    > college studies. Wonderful boat -- and PHRF rating.
                    >
                    > Dan
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                    > > Dan,
                    > >
                    > > Thanks for the info re: a towing vehicle, etc. for a Hobie 33.
                    I'm
                    > > about to step into somewhat new territory by switching from an in-
                    > the-
                    > > water boat to a trailerable one, so any advice is appreciated.
                    > >
                    > > My intent is to keep the boat on a trailer at a boatyard here in
                    > > SoCal, preferably with the mast up, then tow it around to the
                    > launch
                    > > ramp when needed. My goal is to then be able to launch the boat
                    > and
                    > > be ready to go within 1/2 hour. Does this seem reasonable?
                    Since
                    > > I'll be launching every time I use it (1 - 3 times per month),
                    > should
                    > > I consider an electric winch essential?
                    > >
                    > > I'll also be buying a truck to do the towing. I don't intend to
                    > use
                    > > the truck other than for towing the boat (usually short-range)
                    and
                    > > the occasional trip to Home Depot, so I just need a vehicle
                    that's
                    > > capable and mechanically sound. I won't be putting on many miles
                    > per
                    > > year, so it seems that I should be OK with a somewhat higher-
                    > mileage
                    > > truck with a tow package. Have you been pretty pleased with your
                    > > F250? Other than fuel costs, do you have an opinion re: gas vs.
                    > > diesel?
                    > >
                    > > Thanks for the help. I'm looking forward to "trading up" (racing-
                    > > wise) my Catalina 30 to a higher-performance boat!
                    > >
                    > > Mark
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, exliberal <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > I tow our Hobie with a Ford F-250 Heavy Duty 4x4 Diesel
                    pickup.
                    > > > Overkill? Hell, yes. Enough overkill? Hell, no.
                    > > >
                    > > > The Hobie and trailer weigh in at around 7,500 pounds. Add
                    > another
                    > > > 2,000+ pounds for the driver, passengers, fuel, and assorted
                    boat
                    > > and
                    > > > truck stuff and you have a load that will stress a very capable
                    > > > pickup. In perfect conditions, almost any vehicle could drag
                    the
                    > > > boat up to speed and then bring it to a stop eventually -- in
                    > > PERFECT
                    > > > conditions. In a panic stop, the physics of trying to control
                    > > 13,500
                    > > > pounds of truck, trailer and boat are truly fearsome.
                    > > >
                    > > > If the tow vehicle and boat get wrapped around a bridge
                    abutment –
                    >
                    > > > or, God forbid - a mommy-missle full of kids, the police will
                    put
                    > > the
                    > > > pieces on a scale. If they exceed the rating of the tow
                    vehicle;
                    > > > *You*Were*Negligent.* That could mean the invalidation of your
                    > > > insurance, shitpots of lawyers, and even a vacation with Bubba.
                    > It
                    > > > doesn't really matter if you were doing 20 a mile from the ramp
                    > or
                    > > 75
                    > > > on the way to Nationals.
                    > > >
                    > > > We are all charged with seamanship on the water – it should be
                    no
                    > > > different on land.
                    > > >
                    > > > So, buy a capable vehicle! Buy older if you have to. I've
                    towed
                    > > RVs
                    > > > and boats for many years; if you have any questions, e-mail me
                    > > > at "ExLiberal at AOL dot Com." (I hope that fools the Spam-
                    > Bots.)
                    > > >
                    > > > Fair seas -- and open roads.
                    > > >
                    > > > Dan
                    > > > Flying Tiger
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                    > > > > I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep
                    on
                    > a
                    > > > > trailer and ramp-launch. I don't currently have a vehicle to
                    > tow
                    > > > it,
                    > > > > so I'm interested in recommendations for minimum size (6 cyl
                    > vs.
                    > > 8,
                    > > > > truck size, etc.) for towing. I'll typically be towing it no
                    > > more
                    > > > > than 5 miles each way, but occasionally will want to travel
                    > > > farther,
                    > > > > maybe 40 miles each way. Thanks for your help!
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Mark
                  • menaceracingteam
                    We towed the Menace from Toledo, Ohio to St.Pete, Florida for the NOODS with my wifes (yeah, she gets the big truck) 1999 F-250 super duty. It is a 4x4, 8
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 15, 2003
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                      We towed the Menace from Toledo, Ohio to St.Pete, Florida for the
                      NOODS with my wifes (yeah, she gets the big truck) 1999 F-250 super
                      duty. It is a 4x4, 8 foot bed, with the suicide rear doors and the
                      Triton V-10. (see pictures of the Rig at:
                      http://www.menacetosobriety.net/2003_st_pete_nood.htm
                      Turning Radius will always be a problem with a 33 foot boat behind
                      you. I nearly got us permanently stuck at a KFC parking lot in
                      Georgia. Luckily the lift-keel configuration makes it really easy
                      to see what is going on around and behind the trailer.
                      We started out getting about 4 MPG, until I decided I could trust
                      the transmission to make some of the shifting decisions, and enabled
                      the overdrive. This brought our MPG up to 6-7 for the rest of the
                      trip. The truck towed beautifully, but of course once we were in
                      St. Pete, we saw virtually every other boat there (not the Hobies,
                      but the other, heavier full Keel PHRF boats) were towed with
                      Deisels. Yes we were having Deisel envy!
                      One important point: Mike put a lot into the trailer. It got all
                      new brakes, some reinforcing, and new lights. The thing pulled like
                      a dream.
                      Well until we got to Southern Ohio, then the ice underneath each
                      overpass made it pretty squirrely, but that is an old story now...
                      I think you can find it in hobie33 message archives somewhere.

                      -Kent
                    • mtrob_326
                      Thanks to everyone for your advice. It s a great help to a trailer- sailing newbie - I really appreciate the opportunity to learn from your positive and
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 15, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Thanks to everyone for your advice. It's a great help to a trailer-
                        sailing newbie - I really appreciate the opportunity to learn from
                        your positive and negative experiences!

                        Mark

                        --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, exliberal <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Sorry for the prior rant. My wife believes that one fine day I'll
                        > break both legs falling off my soapbox.
                        >
                        > What I was trying to say is that it is a very good idea to follow
                        the
                        > vehicle tow ratings. Those ratings are the manufacture's best,
                        > reasoned, engineered estimations of what their vehicle can safely
                        > tow. The ratings are probably not overly conservative as the truck
                        > manufactures are in a constant propaganda battle with their
                        > competitors.
                        >
                        > Go to your library and get the Trailer Life issue devoted to tow
                        > vehicles. That issue contains an excellent tutorial on what all
                        the
                        > different ratings mean. You can research an older truck by picking
                        > up the issue from the applicable year.
                        >
                        > As for a new truck recommendation: How I wish I was in your shoes!
                        > My 1990 has to last quite a few more years before I get to go truck
                        > shopping again! All of the domestic manufactures are turning out
                        > truly exceptional products. Yes, I'm partial to Fords and diesels,
                        > but that wouldn't stop me from looking at the whole gamut!
                        >
                        > Couple of things: IMNSHO, buy used and buy capability. Here in Low-
                        > Cal I see a lot of great trucks for sale that have never been used
                        > for anything except hauling groceries. One of those creampuffs
                        will
                        > go for a fraction of what a new truck will. Buy big (big engine,
                        big
                        > brakes, big wheels, big tow rating.) You'll be comfortable and
                        safe
                        > and surprised at how little cost differential there is between a
                        used
                        > F-150, 250 and 350. Buy one with the options (better resale value)
                        > and put a Class V hitch on her. I own a 4x4 – wouldn't buy one for
                        > towing – too big of a turning radius. However, there is that new
                        > Chevy with four wheel steering…
                        >
                        > Now for the fun stuff: Our Hobie has a fixed keel. We keep it 40
                        > feet away from the crane with the mast up. And it still takes two
                        > men the better part of an hour to launch her. We're are getting
                        > better with practice but – I find myself longing for the days of
                        > throwing the lines over the side and going sailing. I have to keep
                        > repeating my mantra of fouling, bottom paint, electrolysis, through
                        > hulls, blisters, and etc, etc, etc….………
                        >
                        > BTW: I have fond memories of a Cat 30 Tall Rig that kept me from my
                        > college studies. Wonderful boat -- and PHRF rating.
                        >
                        > Dan
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                        > > Dan,
                        > >
                        > > Thanks for the info re: a towing vehicle, etc. for a Hobie 33.
                        I'm
                        > > about to step into somewhat new territory by switching from an in-
                        > the-
                        > > water boat to a trailerable one, so any advice is appreciated.
                        > >
                        > > My intent is to keep the boat on a trailer at a boatyard here in
                        > > SoCal, preferably with the mast up, then tow it around to the
                        > launch
                        > > ramp when needed. My goal is to then be able to launch the boat
                        > and
                        > > be ready to go within 1/2 hour. Does this seem reasonable?
                        Since
                        > > I'll be launching every time I use it (1 - 3 times per month),
                        > should
                        > > I consider an electric winch essential?
                        > >
                        > > I'll also be buying a truck to do the towing. I don't intend to
                        > use
                        > > the truck other than for towing the boat (usually short-range)
                        and
                        > > the occasional trip to Home Depot, so I just need a vehicle
                        that's
                        > > capable and mechanically sound. I won't be putting on many miles
                        > per
                        > > year, so it seems that I should be OK with a somewhat higher-
                        > mileage
                        > > truck with a tow package. Have you been pretty pleased with your
                        > > F250? Other than fuel costs, do you have an opinion re: gas vs.
                        > > diesel?
                        > >
                        > > Thanks for the help. I'm looking forward to "trading up" (racing-
                        > > wise) my Catalina 30 to a higher-performance boat!
                        > >
                        > > Mark
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, exliberal <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > I tow our Hobie with a Ford F-250 Heavy Duty 4x4 Diesel
                        pickup.
                        > > > Overkill? Hell, yes. Enough overkill? Hell, no.
                        > > >
                        > > > The Hobie and trailer weigh in at around 7,500 pounds. Add
                        > another
                        > > > 2,000+ pounds for the driver, passengers, fuel, and assorted
                        boat
                        > > and
                        > > > truck stuff and you have a load that will stress a very capable
                        > > > pickup. In perfect conditions, almost any vehicle could drag
                        the
                        > > > boat up to speed and then bring it to a stop eventually -- in
                        > > PERFECT
                        > > > conditions. In a panic stop, the physics of trying to control
                        > > 13,500
                        > > > pounds of truck, trailer and boat are truly fearsome.
                        > > >
                        > > > If the tow vehicle and boat get wrapped around a bridge
                        abutment –
                        >
                        > > > or, God forbid - a mommy-missle full of kids, the police will
                        put
                        > > the
                        > > > pieces on a scale. If they exceed the rating of the tow
                        vehicle;
                        > > > *You*Were*Negligent.* That could mean the invalidation of your
                        > > > insurance, shitpots of lawyers, and even a vacation with Bubba.
                        > It
                        > > > doesn't really matter if you were doing 20 a mile from the ramp
                        > or
                        > > 75
                        > > > on the way to Nationals.
                        > > >
                        > > > We are all charged with seamanship on the water – it should be
                        no
                        > > > different on land.
                        > > >
                        > > > So, buy a capable vehicle! Buy older if you have to. I've
                        towed
                        > > RVs
                        > > > and boats for many years; if you have any questions, e-mail me
                        > > > at "ExLiberal at AOL dot Com." (I hope that fools the Spam-
                        > Bots.)
                        > > >
                        > > > Fair seas -- and open roads.
                        > > >
                        > > > Dan
                        > > > Flying Tiger
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                        > > > > I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will keep
                        on
                        > a
                        > > > > trailer and ramp-launch. I don't currently have a vehicle to
                        > tow
                        > > > it,
                        > > > > so I'm interested in recommendations for minimum size (6 cyl
                        > vs.
                        > > 8,
                        > > > > truck size, etc.) for towing. I'll typically be towing it no
                        > > more
                        > > > > than 5 miles each way, but occasionally will want to travel
                        > > > farther,
                        > > > > maybe 40 miles each way. Thanks for your help!
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Mark
                      • exliberal
                        Trailer Life magazine lists the rated towing capacity for every truck, engine, transmission, drive train and suspension combination for the last five years at
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 17, 2003
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Trailer Life magazine lists the rated towing capacity for every
                          truck, engine, transmission, drive train and suspension combination
                          for the last five years at the following website:

                          http://www.trailerlife.com/output.cfm?id=42175

                          Enjoy!


                          --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                          > Thanks to everyone for your advice. It's a great help to a trailer-
                          > sailing newbie - I really appreciate the opportunity to learn from
                          > your positive and negative experiences!
                          >
                          > Mark
                          >
                          > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, exliberal <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Sorry for the prior rant. My wife believes that one fine day
                          I'll
                          > > break both legs falling off my soapbox.
                          > >
                          > > What I was trying to say is that it is a very good idea to follow
                          > the
                          > > vehicle tow ratings. Those ratings are the manufacture's best,
                          > > reasoned, engineered estimations of what their vehicle can safely
                          > > tow. The ratings are probably not overly conservative as the
                          truck
                          > > manufactures are in a constant propaganda battle with their
                          > > competitors.
                          > >
                          > > Go to your library and get the Trailer Life issue devoted to tow
                          > > vehicles. That issue contains an excellent tutorial on what all
                          > the
                          > > different ratings mean. You can research an older truck by
                          picking
                          > > up the issue from the applicable year.
                          > >
                          > > As for a new truck recommendation: How I wish I was in your
                          shoes!
                          > > My 1990 has to last quite a few more years before I get to go
                          truck
                          > > shopping again! All of the domestic manufactures are turning out
                          > > truly exceptional products. Yes, I'm partial to Fords and
                          diesels,
                          > > but that wouldn't stop me from looking at the whole gamut!
                          > >
                          > > Couple of things: IMNSHO, buy used and buy capability. Here in
                          Low-
                          > > Cal I see a lot of great trucks for sale that have never been
                          used
                          > > for anything except hauling groceries. One of those creampuffs
                          > will
                          > > go for a fraction of what a new truck will. Buy big (big engine,
                          > big
                          > > brakes, big wheels, big tow rating.) You'll be comfortable and
                          > safe
                          > > and surprised at how little cost differential there is between a
                          > used
                          > > F-150, 250 and 350. Buy one with the options (better resale
                          value)
                          > > and put a Class V hitch on her. I own a 4x4 – wouldn't buy one
                          for
                          > > towing – too big of a turning radius. However, there is that new
                          > > Chevy with four wheel steering…
                          > >
                          > > Now for the fun stuff: Our Hobie has a fixed keel. We keep it
                          40
                          > > feet away from the crane with the mast up. And it still takes
                          two
                          > > men the better part of an hour to launch her. We're are getting
                          > > better with practice but – I find myself longing for the days of
                          > > throwing the lines over the side and going sailing. I have to
                          keep
                          > > repeating my mantra of fouling, bottom paint, electrolysis,
                          through
                          > > hulls, blisters, and etc, etc, etc….………
                          > >
                          > > BTW: I have fond memories of a Cat 30 Tall Rig that kept me from
                          my
                          > > college studies. Wonderful boat -- and PHRF rating.
                          > >
                          > > Dan
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...> wrote:
                          > > > Dan,
                          > > >
                          > > > Thanks for the info re: a towing vehicle, etc. for a Hobie 33.
                          > I'm
                          > > > about to step into somewhat new territory by switching from an
                          in-
                          > > the-
                          > > > water boat to a trailerable one, so any advice is appreciated.
                          > > >
                          > > > My intent is to keep the boat on a trailer at a boatyard here
                          in
                          > > > SoCal, preferably with the mast up, then tow it around to the
                          > > launch
                          > > > ramp when needed. My goal is to then be able to launch the
                          boat
                          > > and
                          > > > be ready to go within 1/2 hour. Does this seem reasonable?
                          > Since
                          > > > I'll be launching every time I use it (1 - 3 times per month),
                          > > should
                          > > > I consider an electric winch essential?
                          > > >
                          > > > I'll also be buying a truck to do the towing. I don't intend
                          to
                          > > use
                          > > > the truck other than for towing the boat (usually short-range)
                          > and
                          > > > the occasional trip to Home Depot, so I just need a vehicle
                          > that's
                          > > > capable and mechanically sound. I won't be putting on many
                          miles
                          > > per
                          > > > year, so it seems that I should be OK with a somewhat higher-
                          > > mileage
                          > > > truck with a tow package. Have you been pretty pleased with
                          your
                          > > > F250? Other than fuel costs, do you have an opinion re: gas
                          vs.
                          > > > diesel?
                          > > >
                          > > > Thanks for the help. I'm looking forward to "trading up"
                          (racing-
                          > > > wise) my Catalina 30 to a higher-performance boat!
                          > > >
                          > > > Mark
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, exliberal <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > I tow our Hobie with a Ford F-250 Heavy Duty 4x4 Diesel
                          > pickup.
                          > > > > Overkill? Hell, yes. Enough overkill? Hell, no.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > The Hobie and trailer weigh in at around 7,500 pounds. Add
                          > > another
                          > > > > 2,000+ pounds for the driver, passengers, fuel, and assorted
                          > boat
                          > > > and
                          > > > > truck stuff and you have a load that will stress a very
                          capable
                          > > > > pickup. In perfect conditions, almost any vehicle could drag
                          > the
                          > > > > boat up to speed and then bring it to a stop eventually -- in
                          > > > PERFECT
                          > > > > conditions. In a panic stop, the physics of trying to
                          control
                          > > > 13,500
                          > > > > pounds of truck, trailer and boat are truly fearsome.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > If the tow vehicle and boat get wrapped around a bridge
                          > abutment –
                          > >
                          > > > > or, God forbid - a mommy-missle full of kids, the police will
                          > put
                          > > > the
                          > > > > pieces on a scale. If they exceed the rating of the tow
                          > vehicle;
                          > > > > *You*Were*Negligent.* That could mean the invalidation of
                          your
                          > > > > insurance, shitpots of lawyers, and even a vacation with
                          Bubba.
                          > > It
                          > > > > doesn't really matter if you were doing 20 a mile from the
                          ramp
                          > > or
                          > > > 75
                          > > > > on the way to Nationals.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > We are all charged with seamanship on the water – it should
                          be
                          > no
                          > > > > different on land.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > So, buy a capable vehicle! Buy older if you have to. I've
                          > towed
                          > > > RVs
                          > > > > and boats for many years; if you have any questions, e-mail
                          me
                          > > > > at "ExLiberal at AOL dot Com." (I hope that fools the Spam-
                          > > Bots.)
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Fair seas -- and open roads.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Dan
                          > > > > Flying Tiger
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --- In hobie33@yahoogroups.com, "mtrob_326" <mtrob@h...>
                          wrote:
                          > > > > > I'm considering buying a lift-keel Hobie 33 that I will
                          keep
                          > on
                          > > a
                          > > > > > trailer and ramp-launch. I don't currently have a vehicle
                          to
                          > > tow
                          > > > > it,
                          > > > > > so I'm interested in recommendations for minimum size (6
                          cyl
                          > > vs.
                          > > > 8,
                          > > > > > truck size, etc.) for towing. I'll typically be towing it
                          no
                          > > > more
                          > > > > > than 5 miles each way, but occasionally will want to travel
                          > > > > farther,
                          > > > > > maybe 40 miles each way. Thanks for your help!
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Mark
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