Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots

Expand Messages
  • John A. Hern Jr
    Geoff: What you are making is shot, not ingot. Ingot is metal in a bar shape for re-use. Dunno what the effect of water on aluminum is, but the question
    Message 1 of 20 , Sep 6, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Geoff:

      What you are making is shot, not ingot. Ingot is metal in a "bar" shape
      for re-use.

      Dunno what the effect of water on aluminum is, but the question would be
      "why do you want shot?"

      John


      John A. Hern Jr. 1900 Millview Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814
      mailto:hern@... Dipl.Ing. Mechanical Engineer
      Foundry: http://www.hernironworks.com
      Greyhounds: http://www.greyhoundpetsinc.org
      Personal: http://www.nidlink.com/~hern



      geoff40@... wrote:
      >
      > Hi all, this is my first post to this group so we'll see how I go.
      > What I would like to know is if anyone has had any experience with
      > casting into water to make ingots.
    • Geoff
      Hi Chuk live in the city of Ipswich about 25 miles west of Brisbane. The Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast are only an hour and a half drive from here also have a
      Message 2 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Chuk live in the city of Ipswich about 25 miles west of Brisbane. The Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast are only an hour and a half drive from here also have a few friends down in Sydney.

        Regards Geoff.

        PS Thanks to all for the advice.










        ---------- Original Message ----------------------------------

        From: "Chuk" <chukalexa@...>
        Reply-To: hobbicast@egroups.com
        Date: Thu, 5 Oct 2000 20:09:31 -0700

        >Geoff--I always do my S. silver and gold that way-I've done a
        >bit of bronze into water also with no problems-I'd assume that
        >ther'd be no problems with aluminum.
        > Where bouts in Queensland are you?? I just moved back
        >from Sydney a coupla years ago. We spent some great times
        >in Queensland, along the Sunshine Coast--a great part of the
        >world!!
        >
        > Cheers--Chuk
      • Geoff
        Hi Chuk live in the city of Ipswich about 25 miles west of Brisbane. The Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast are only an hour and a half drive from here also have a
        Message 3 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Chuk live in the city of Ipswich about 25 miles west of Brisbane. The Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast are only an hour and a half drive from here also have a few friends down in Sydney.

          Regards Geoff.

          PS Thanks to all for the advice.










          ---------- Original Message ----------------------------------

          From: "Chuk" <chukalexa@...>
          Reply-To: hobbicast@egroups.com
          Date: Thu, 5 Oct 2000 20:09:31 -0700

          >Geoff--I always do my S. silver and gold that way-I've done a
          >bit of bronze into water also with no problems-I'd assume that
          >ther'd be no problems with aluminum.
          > Where bouts in Queensland are you?? I just moved back
          >from Sydney a coupla years ago. We spent some great times
          >in Queensland, along the Sunshine Coast--a great part of the
          >world!!
          >
          > Cheers--Chuk
        • lynn.chidester@xtp.varian.com
          Why not just cast the ingots in some ingot molds. They can be made (for next to nothing) from a couple of pieces of C channel with scrap welded on the ends.
          Message 4 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            Why not just cast the ingots in some ingot molds. They can be made (for
            next to nothing) from a couple of pieces of C channel with scrap welded on
            the ends. This gives me a chance to remove any tramp metal, and provides
            clean metal for the next melt.

            What I'd like to know is why one would want to do this? Sure, thin scrap
            melts better than thick scrap, and some liquid metal in the pot bottom
            does help transfer heat, but still WHY? Especially, when hot metals are
            more reactive than cooler metals, and some lawnmower parts are made from
            magnesium alloys. Sounds to me like a good formula for problems, with no
            obvious benefits.

            Lynn C.



            geoff40@gogo.
            net.au To: hobbicast@egroups.com
            cc:
            10/05/00 Subject: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots
            08:34 PM
            Please
            respond to
            hobbicast





            Hi all, this is my first post to this group so we'll see how I go.
            What I would like to know is if anyone has had any experience with
            casting into water to make ingots. I have tried it by dribbling
            molten
            aluminium into a deep drum of water and the resulting ingots come out
            like popcorn. The big question is, would this affect the alloy in any
            way ie: making it brittle or changing its structure etc, with the
            sudden cooling. My scrap consists mainly of lawnmower motors.

            ***EXTREME CAUTION IS USED***



            Regards
            Geoff Nutley
            Ipswich Queensland Australia


            Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
            http://budgetcastingsupply.com/

            The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here:
            http://members.xoom.com/HWilkinson/index.htm
            It includes member project pages & links

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          • john
            What other method could a person use to maximize the amount of aluminumoxide? john
            Message 5 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              What other method could a person use to maximize the amount of
              aluminumoxide? john
            • Foundryman
              Goeff, I totally agree with Lynn s post. Don t pour in water--not a problem in the pour if done carefully, but you could have trapped water in the
              Message 6 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
              • 0 Attachment
                Goeff, I totally agree with Lynn's post. Don't pour in water--not a
                problem in the pour if done carefully, but you could have trapped water in
                the remelt--explosive!! The better option is to make some steel forms as
                Lynn suggested. I have used angle iron with welded on and tapered ends, but
                now prefer to use iron/steel pipe split in half with welded on ends/make
                sure you have a bit of draft on the ends. You will be able to melt more
                metal with solid pigs than you can with 'dropped in water nodules and more
                importunately, the pigs will melt with very little loss!!!! The more
                exposure to O2, the more melt loss as in small jewelry size
                nodules!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                Best, Jerry

                Custom Castings by Twaddell


                foundryman@...


                http://members.igateway.net/~jtwad/













                http://members.igateway.net/~jtwad/
              • lawrence jackman
                Why not make a tube about 6 in dia and put a piece of hardware cloth 1 inside the top. Stand it up on end, cloth to the top, brace so it will not fall over.
                Message 7 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
                • 0 Attachment
                  Why not make a tube about 6" in dia and put a
                  piece of hardware cloth 1" inside the top. Stand
                  it up on end, cloth to the top, brace so it will
                  not fall over. Pour your metal into this slowly.
                  After each ladle empty the tube. This is the way
                  they make ball bearings and shot and other round
                  stuff.
                  Larry

                  Foundryman wrote:
                  >
                • Becnel Kirk
                  If you are sand casting, you can make some ingots by making impressions in sand with something then sprinkling some parting dust over it. Then just pour into
                  Message 8 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
                  • 0 Attachment
                    If you are sand casting, you can make some ingots by making impressions in
                    sand with something then sprinkling some parting dust over it. Then just
                    pour into them. This works good for me.

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: lawrence jackman [mailto:ljack70117@...]
                    Sent: Friday, October 06, 2000 2:13 PM
                    To: hobbicast@egroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots


                    Why not make a tube about 6" in dia and put a
                    piece of hardware cloth 1" inside the top. Stand
                    it up on end, cloth to the top, brace so it will
                    not fall over. Pour your metal into this slowly.
                    After each ladle empty the tube. This is the way
                    they make ball bearings and shot and other round
                    stuff.
                    Larry

                    Foundryman wrote:
                    >

                    Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                    http://budgetcastingsupply.com/

                    The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here:
                    http://members.xoom.com/HWilkinson/index.htm
                    It includes member project pages & links

                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                  • lynn.chidester@xtp.varian.com
                    Jerry: The split pipe idea sounds ok, but seems a little more work than my ingot molds made from channel. I used structural channel (provides the built in
                    Message 9 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Jerry:

                      The split pipe idea sounds ok, but seems a little more work than my ingot
                      molds made from channel. I used structural channel (provides the built in
                      draft) and cut the ends of the channel at the same angle (as the inside
                      wall/provides draft). Then just welded on (on the inside of the channel) 2
                      rect. pieces of steel to close the ends, and provide the feet (supports the
                      mold off the work surface, provides better cooling). The channel is avail.
                      in various sizes, so one can have several size ingots. I took the time to
                      grind/smooth the welds on one mold, but it doesn't work any better than the
                      ones I left rough.

                      Lynn C.



                      "Foundryman"
                      <foundryman@iga To: <hobbicast@egroups.com>
                      teway.net> cc:
                      Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots
                      10/06/00 12:59
                      PM
                      Please respond
                      to hobbicast





                      Goeff, I totally agree with Lynn's post. Don't pour in water--not a
                      problem in the pour if done carefully, but you could have trapped water in
                      the remelt--explosive!! The better option is to make some steel forms as
                      Lynn suggested. I have used angle iron with welded on and tapered ends,
                      but
                      now prefer to use iron/steel pipe split in half with welded on ends/make
                      sure you have a bit of draft on the ends. You will be able to melt more
                      metal with solid pigs than you can with 'dropped in water nodules and more
                      importunately, the pigs will melt with very little loss!!!! The more
                      exposure to O2, the more melt loss as in small jewelry size
                      nodules!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                      Best, Jerry

                      Custom Castings by Twaddell


                      foundryman@...


                      http://members.igateway.net/~jtwad/













                      http://members.igateway.net/~jtwad/







                      Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                      http://budgetcastingsupply.com/

                      The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here:
                      http://members.xoom.com/HWilkinson/index.htm
                      It includes member project pages & links

                      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                    • JBraun7747@aol.com
                      Why not go garage sales and pick up some muffin tims...(steel ones available for pennies) then pour the left over aluminum into them. I also bought a cast
                      Message 10 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Why not go garage sales and pick up some muffin tims...(steel ones available
                        for pennies) then pour the left over aluminum into them. I also bought a
                        cast iron cornbread mould that looks like miniature corn cobs (halves) and
                        pour my first left over aluminum into these. The make great gifts and also
                        can be used on remelts.
                        Jerry in Spokane
                      • Chuk
                        The whole reason for casting metal by dropping it molten into water is to enable you to use small, exact amounts of the metal for small delicate casting
                        Message 11 of 20 , Oct 6, 2000
                        • 0 Attachment
                          The whole reason for casting metal by dropping it molten into
                          water is to enable you to use small, exact amounts of the metal
                          for small delicate casting projects such as jewelry. Instead of
                          ingots, you have small shot and flakes which are much easier
                          and more exact to use.
                          I've used this process many times after making an alloy,
                          such as Sterling-dump a pound or so into a pail of water, and
                          you're ready to do several small castings. And there's never
                          been a problem with encapsulated water, either time or the
                          slow warmup of the crucible will get rid of it all......................

                          Cheers--Chuk
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: lynn.chidester@... <lynn.chidester@...>
                          To: hobbicast@egroups.com <hobbicast@egroups.com>
                          Date: Friday, October 06, 2000 7:58 AM
                          Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots


                          >
                          >Why not just cast the ingots in some ingot molds. They can be made (for
                          >next to nothing) from a couple of pieces of C channel with scrap welded on
                          >the ends. This gives me a chance to remove any tramp metal, and provides
                          >clean metal for the next melt.
                          >
                          >What I'd like to know is why one would want to do this? Sure, thin scrap
                          >melts better than thick scrap, and some liquid metal in the pot bottom
                          >does help transfer heat, but still WHY? Especially, when hot metals are
                          >more reactive than cooler metals, and some lawnmower parts are made from
                          >magnesium alloys. Sounds to me like a good formula for problems, with no
                          >obvious benefits.
                          >
                          >Lynn C.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > geoff40@gogo.
                          > net.au To: hobbicast@egroups.com
                          > cc:
                          > 10/05/00 Subject: [hobbicast] Casting
                          Ingots
                          > 08:34 PM
                          > Please
                          > respond to
                          > hobbicast
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >Hi all, this is my first post to this group so we'll see how I go.
                          >What I would like to know is if anyone has had any experience with
                          >casting into water to make ingots. I have tried it by dribbling
                          >molten
                          >aluminium into a deep drum of water and the resulting ingots come out
                          >like popcorn. The big question is, would this affect the alloy in any
                          >way ie: making it brittle or changing its structure etc, with the
                          >sudden cooling. My scrap consists mainly of lawnmower motors.
                          >
                          >***EXTREME CAUTION IS USED***
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >Regards
                          >Geoff Nutley
                          >Ipswich Queensland Australia
                          >
                          >
                          >Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                          >http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                          >
                          >The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here:
                          >http://members.xoom.com/HWilkinson/index.htm
                          >It includes member project pages & links
                          >
                          >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                          >hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                          >http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                          >
                          >The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here:
                          http://members.xoom.com/HWilkinson/index.htm
                          >It includes member project pages & links
                          >
                          >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                          >hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • lawrence jackman
                          If the water is trapped in side the small piece of metal, a slow warm up will not help. I have had brass explode and come out of the crucible and splatter all
                          Message 12 of 20 , Oct 7, 2000
                          • 0 Attachment
                            If the water is trapped in side the small piece of
                            metal, a slow warm up will not help. I have had
                            brass explode and come out of the crucible and
                            splatter all over the place.
                            Larry

                            Chuk wrote:
                            >
                            > The whole reason for casting metal by dropping it molten into
                            > water is to enable you to use small, exact amounts of the metal
                          • John Killian
                            Geoff You are using jewerly techniques designed for precisous metals. Gold and Silver, to a great extent, do not oxiodise. Aluinum does and will. Any surface
                            Message 13 of 20 , Oct 7, 2000
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Geoff
                              You are using jewerly techniques designed for precisous metals. Gold
                              and Silver, to a great extent, do not oxiodise. Aluinum does and
                              will.
                              Any surface will generate floss(oxide) and a large ammount of flux
                              will be needed to clear it up. Your jewerly casting was most probally
                              done with a open top flask for centrifical casting work. This will
                              drive off the mositure because you load the flask with all of the
                              metal and then heat. On the other hand metal casters start a heat
                              with only a part of the metal in the crubicle and after it has melted
                              more metal has melted more metal is added. This second (sometimes
                              third,forth...) load of metal must be dry. (I have also blown metal
                              all over the place from only one drop of water.)

                              If you use the star burst aluminum in an open top flask the torch
                              flame will convert a large ammount of the metal to dross defeating
                              thecontrol process. (Try melting a soft drink can or a beer can if one
                              is more handy.)In jewerly the metal is exteremlly expesive and the
                              control of it is necessary. In metal casting the time is the more
                              expensive. Fill the crubicle and poor the excess into ingots. (I
                              actally like pouring the ingots as the tops shrink and cool a little
                              different each time.) Any container will work as long as it will take
                              the heat and has slooping sides so the ingot will fall out. I use a
                              20 Ga sheet metal tray held at a 45 degree angle. I get a nice 10
                              inch
                              long ingot that is 2x2x2. The tray has deformed a bit but I still
                              have three more corners to use up.

                              Good Luck in your casting.

                              John Killian

                              > Hi all, this is my first post to this group so we'll see how I go.
                              > What I would like to know is if anyone has had any experience with
                              > casting into water to make ingots. I have tried it by dribbling
                              > molten
                              > aluminium into a deep drum of water and the resulting ingots come
                              out
                              > like popcorn. The big question is, would this affect the alloy in
                              any
                              > way ie: making it brittle or changing its structure etc, with the
                              > sudden cooling. My scrap consists mainly of lawnmower motors.
                              >
                              > ***EXTREME CAUTION IS USED***
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Regards
                              > Geoff Nutley
                              > Ipswich Queensland Australia
                            • Howard
                              John: ... Nobody responded to this post...... I m very curious why you wish to produce aluminum oxide.... Are you wanting an abrasive or refractory material of
                              Message 14 of 20 , Oct 8, 2000
                              • 0 Attachment
                                John:
                                You wrote:

                                >What other method could a person use to maximize the amount of
                                >aluminumoxide? john

                                Nobody responded to this post...... I'm very curious why you wish to
                                produce aluminum oxide.... Are you wanting an abrasive or refractory
                                material of some sort?
                                Aluminum is pretty reactive to oxygen..... the
                                surface oxidizes very quickly. It won't "cut" with a torch like steel
                                will, but I wonder if using a cutting torch on a piece of aluminum.....
                                melting it and blowing it off from the edge with the oxygen stream would do
                                what you want..... It is difficult to deal with using a torch due to the
                                high melt temp of the oxide surface.

                                I wonder what an oxygen lance as used in a cuppola would do in molten
                                aluminum...... A scary thought.... probably dangerous.... One should find
                                someone who knows before attempting anything like this.

                                It is interesting to note that aluminum powder is extremely flamable and
                                is used in demolition as fusing.... the stuff is in a plastic capillary tube
                                and is used because it has a very predictable burn rate, and will not be set
                                off accidentally by radio waves like electric caps can (induction I think).
                                The safest way to set off explosives. Powdered auminum is also used in some
                                explosive & high temp burning compositions.

                                H.W.
                                Howard
                                owly@...
                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: john <jgriffin@...>
                                To: hobbicast@egroups.com <hobbicast@egroups.com>
                                Date: Friday, October 06, 2000 12:57 PM
                                Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots


                                >What other method could a person use to maximize the amount of
                                >aluminumoxide? john
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                                >http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                                >
                                >The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here:
                                http://members.xoom.com/HWilkinson/index.htm
                                >It includes member project pages & links
                                >
                                >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                >hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • R. W. Smith
                                Aluminum powder is also used as a UV shield, mixed with nitrate or more currently butyrate dope after the base coats and before the color/finish coats on
                                Message 15 of 20 , Oct 8, 2000
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Aluminum powder is also used as a UV shield, mixed with nitrate or more
                                  currently butyrate dope after the base coats and before the color/finish
                                  coats on fabric covered aircraft (have sold the stuff for the same
                                  purpose on boat deck covering and also for the making of fireworks.)
                                  When this stuff catches fire, forget it, head for cover.

                                  Dick
                                  dws@...

                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: "Howard" <owly@...>
                                  To: <hobbicast@egroups.com>
                                  Sent: Sunday, October 08, 2000 8:46 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots


                                  > John:
                                  > You wrote:
                                  >
                                  > >What other method could a person use to maximize the amount of
                                  > >aluminumoxide? john
                                  >
                                  > Nobody responded to this post...... I'm very curious why you wish
                                  to
                                  > produce aluminum oxide.... Are you wanting an abrasive or refractory

                                  <><<><><

                                  > It is interesting to note that aluminum powder is extremely
                                  flamable and
                                  > is used in demolition as fusing.... the stuff is in a plastic
                                  capillary tube
                                  > and is used because it has a very predictable burn rate, and will not
                                  be set
                                  > off accidentally by radio waves like electric caps can (induction I
                                  think).
                                  > The safest way to set off explosives. Powdered auminum is also used
                                  in some
                                  > explosive & high temp burning compositions.
                                  >
                                  > H.W.
                                  > Howard
                                  > owly@...
                                  > -----Original Message-----
                                  > From: john <jgriffin@...>
                                  > To: hobbicast@egroups.com <hobbicast@egroups.com>
                                  > Date: Friday, October 06, 2000 12:57 PM
                                  > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > >What other method could a person use to maximize the amount of
                                  > >aluminumoxide? john
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                • gene
                                  I like to cast my ingots in open sand flasks. I made ingot patterns from scrap Bass Wood and used plenty of draft so the patterns would pull out of the sand
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Oct 11, 2000
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    I like to cast my ingots in open sand flasks. I made ingot patterns
                                    from scrap 'Bass Wood' and used plenty of draft so the patterns would
                                    pull out of the sand easily and attached them to a follow board.
                                    I made several to fit the different size flasks I had on hand.
                                    I spaced the patterns about 1 1/2" apart and the size of the ingots
                                    are dependent on the size of the crucible I will be useing. I gain
                                    several experiences by doing this.
                                    1st) I get used to ramming the sand and all the other aspects of
                                    handling the flasks ie: rolling over, pattern rapping & pull.
                                    2nd) I get the feel of pouring into sand.
                                    3rd) The thrill of shaking the hot metal out of sand.
                                    4th) Have never had an ingot stick into the channel iron mold, or
                                    muffin tin.
                                    5th) Got some experience making a pattern and how much parting
                                    powder to use for good pattern release.
                                    6th) Warms the sand on cold days so the actual piece I'm casting
                                    seems to mold better?
                                    7th) Never got enough of playing in the sand as a kid! Ha!
                                    8th) You can make fancy patterns with your logo or foundry name on
                                    ingots. ( I like showing off my handy work even if it's only
                                    ingots... )

                                    Cheers Gene
                                    Mountain Machine Works
                                    Gig Harbor, Wa.
                                  • wolfy360
                                    Sorry I was thinking of something else. Gene ... From: gene To: Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2000 8:52 PM
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Oct 11, 2000
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Sorry I was thinking of something else.
                                      Gene
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: "gene " <gene@...>
                                      To: <hobbicast@egroups.com>
                                      Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2000 8:52 PM
                                      Subject: [hobbicast] Casting Ingots


                                      > I like to cast my ingots in open sand flasks. I made ingot patterns
                                      > from scrap 'Bass Wood' and used plenty of draft so the patterns would
                                      > pull out of the sand easily and attached them to a follow board.
                                      > I made several to fit the different size flasks I had on hand.
                                      > I spaced the patterns about 1 1/2" apart and the size of the ingots
                                      > are dependent on the size of the crucible I will be useing. I gain
                                      > several experiences by doing this.
                                      > 1st) I get used to ramming the sand and all the other aspects of
                                      > handling the flasks ie: rolling over, pattern rapping & pull.
                                      > 2nd) I get the feel of pouring into sand.
                                      > 3rd) The thrill of shaking the hot metal out of sand.
                                      > 4th) Have never had an ingot stick into the channel iron mold, or
                                      > muffin tin.
                                      > 5th) Got some experience making a pattern and how much parting
                                      > powder to use for good pattern release.
                                      > 6th) Warms the sand on cold days so the actual piece I'm casting
                                      > seems to mold better?
                                      > 7th) Never got enough of playing in the sand as a kid! Ha!
                                      > 8th) You can make fancy patterns with your logo or foundry name on
                                      > ingots. ( I like showing off my handy work even if it's only
                                      > ingots... )
                                      >
                                      > Cheers Gene
                                      > Mountain Machine Works
                                      > Gig Harbor, Wa.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                                      > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                                      >
                                      > The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here:
                                      http://members.xoom.com/HWilkinson/index.htm
                                      > It includes member project pages & links
                                      >
                                      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                      > hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.