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Re: [hobbicast] Paint & Clear Coat For Brass

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  • Ray Brandes
    Jon, I have experience with enamal and I would make my buckle from copper and do the design in cloisonne. -Ray
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 1, 2001
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      Jon,
      I have experience with enamal and I would make my buckle from copper and do the design in cloisonne.
      -Ray

      jtcharbonneaux@... wrote:

      > Hi All,
      > I am in the final planning stages of an engraved brass belt buckle &
      > am wanting to paint the machined out sections (Letters & Logo). Has
      > anyone suggestions for paint/clear coat combinations? I would hate
      > to
      > give this to a business associate & have the paint chip out. I was
      > wondering if there was any bake type finishes or if plain old paint
      > would work. Many thanks in advance.
      > Regards,
      > Jon
      >
      > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
      > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
      >
      > The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here: http://members.nbci.com/HWilkinson/
      > It includes member project pages & links
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      >
      >
      >
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    • Ray Brandes
      Cloisonne is french for wall or partition. The enamal is actualy glass, finely ground and then fused to the substrate in a kiln. You can do it on a stove top
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 1, 2001
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        Cloisonne is french for wall or partition. The enamal is actualy glass, finely ground and then fused
        to the substrate in a kiln. You can do it on a stove top with a pot pie igloo, but it is tricky.
        I like to use copper, I have never tried brass. The piece needs a back coat of enamal to equalize the
        eventual stresses. The front side usually has a recess for the design. The closions are made from pure
        silver, about .007" thick and as high as necessary. They are bent to the shapes of the design and set
        in the recess. A light coat of clear enamal is fired to hold them in place. Then the color enamals are
        moistened for easier handling and placed very carefully inside the the silver bounded areas. This gets
        fused and the process is repeated until the enamal level is above the final surface. Then the top gets
        ground with a whet stone and finer and finer grades of wet-or-dry. When done right, the finished piece
        is exceptional in appearance and because it is glass it is very durable.
        - Ray

        GuyW wrote:

        > Use whatever type of enamel is used for "clossioned" (sp?) medallions.
        >
        > -Guy-
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: <jtcharbonneaux@...>
        > To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2001 4:28 PM
        > Subject: [hobbicast] Paint & Clear Coat For Brass
        >
        > > Hi All,
        > > I am in the final planning stages of an engraved brass belt buckle &
        > > am wanting to paint the machined out sections (Letters & Logo). Has
        > > anyone suggestions for paint/clear coat combinations? I would hate
        > > to
        > > give this to a business associate & have the paint chip out. I was
        > > wondering if there was any bake type finishes or if plain old paint
        > > would work. Many thanks in advance.
        > > Regards,
        > > Jon
        > >
        > >
        > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
        > >
        > > The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here:
        > http://members.nbci.com/HWilkinson/
        > > It includes member project pages & links
        > >
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > > hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        > >
        > >
        >
        > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
        >
        > The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here: http://members.nbci.com/HWilkinson/
        > It includes member project pages & links
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • John Grant
        Go to any hobby store that has copper enamling supplies. It comes as a fine powder that you sprinkel onto the buckle. You then fire it at around 1000 degrees
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 1, 2001
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          Go to any hobby store that has copper enamling supplies. It comes as a fine powder that you sprinkel
          onto the buckle. You then fire it at around 1000 degrees F. The enamel fuses to the buckel and you gave
          a hard surface just like a bath tub or sink.

          John Grant

          Jon wrote:

          > Hi John,
          > Many thanks for your reply! I am afraid that I don't know what type of enamel that it. Could you
          > by chance give the brand name(s) & possible sources for it? Again, many thanks.
          > Regards,
          > Jon
          >
          > John Grant wrote:
          >
          > > I have use used the type of enamal used in copper enamaling on brass.
          > >
          > > John Grant
          > >
          > > jtcharbonneaux@... wrote:
          > >
          > > > Hi All,
          > > > I am in the final planning stages of an engraved brass belt buckle &
          > > > am wanting to paint the machined out sections (Letters & Logo). Has
          > > > anyone suggestions for paint/clear coat combinations? I would hate
          > > > to
          > > > give this to a business associate & have the paint chip out. I was
          > > > wondering if there was any bake type finishes or if plain old paint
          > > > would work. Many thanks in advance.
          > > > Regards,
          > > > Jon
          > > >
          > > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
          > > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
          > > >
          > > > The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here: http://members.nbci.com/HWilkinson/
          > > > It includes member project pages & links
          > > >
          > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > > > hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > >
          > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
          > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
          > >
          > > The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here: http://members.nbci.com/HWilkinson/
          > > It includes member project pages & links
          > >
          > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > > hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
          > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
          >
          > The Home Foundrymen's Association website may be found here: http://members.nbci.com/HWilkinson/
          > It includes member project pages & links
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • John Grant
          ... I do not used a back coat. John Grant
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 1, 2001
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            Ray Brandes wrote:

            > Cloisonne is french for wall or partition. The enamal is actualy glass, finely ground and then fused
            > to the substrate in a kiln. You can do it on a stove top with a pot pie igloo, but it is tricky.
            > I like to use copper, I have never tried brass. The piece needs a back coat of enamal to equalize the
            > eventual stresses.

            I do not used a back coat.

            John Grant
          • Keith Baird
            ... .. engraved brass belt buckle & am wanting to paint the machined out sections (Letters & Logo). Has anyone suggestions for paint/clear coat combinations?
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 1, 2001
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              --- In hobbicast@y..., jtcharbonneaux@q... wrote:
              .. engraved brass belt buckle & am wanting to paint the machined out
              sections (Letters & Logo). Has anyone suggestions for paint/clear
              coat combinations?

              Jon

              Depending on the design and style of the belt, the (glass)enamel may
              or may not be practical. If this belt buckle is going to get rough
              use,(jeans, T shirt, have a few beers at teh pool hall, etc.)
              repairing cracked enamel can be a real headache since to melt new
              enamel in you have to remelt the existing stuff and you may have
              difficulty getting a good colour match.

              I studied goldsmithing for three years full-time in the mid -70's and
              when we were learning enamel repair, one trick was to mix epoxy glue
              with acrylic artists' colors and carefully repair the crack or chip.
              When it was hard you could carefully polish the finish to match.

              If this is a strictly dress belt, glass enamel may be fine. Depending
              on how large the buckle itself is you may be able to apply the enamel
              on the front, put it on a metal stand and heat the back of the buckle
              with a propane torch till the enamel fuses. Instead of clear coating
              the metal, I'd have it plated with 14 kt gold. It isn't that
              expensive and the gold won't tarnish. You can plate after the enamel
              is applied.

              One design option that you might consider is having the
              pierced/engraved piece like the top piece of bread in a sandwich with
              the decoration cut out. The meat in the sandwich could be a flat
              piece of polished silver with a transparent coat of coloured enamel
              over top. The top piece would protect the glass and the silver and
              transparent enamel would give a "candy apple" effect to the colored
              areas. Faberge, the jeweller to the Russian Court made some fantastic
              pieces with this tranparent color coat technique. By the way, you can
              grind your own enamel from colored glass.

              In any case, I'd suggest getting a book from the library on
              enamelling and experiment a bit before you work on the masterpiece.
              I see some writers suggest counter-enamelling the back of the piece
              and some don't . Generally, the thinner the metal the more likely it
              is to warp if both sides are not enamelled.

              Email me off line if you need more info.

              Keith Baird
            • LLandstrom
              IASCO used to have a powder which you would bake and it would flow into a glossy surface. I was called some sort of low temperature enamel. I ve never used
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 1, 2001
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                IASCO used to have a "powder" which you would bake and
                it would flow into a glossy surface. I was called some
                sort of low temperature enamel. I've never used it
                though.

                LL

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