Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [hobbicast] Digest Number 4129

Expand Messages
  • Brett Phillips
    I m a CWI in a weld shop in VA. We would likely run either a COREX Versatile E71-T1xxx wire or its Select Arc equivalent:
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 17, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm a CWI in a weld shop in VA. We would likely run either a COREX Versatile E71-T1xxx wire or its' Select Arc equivalent:


      If your power supply can hack 350 Amps and 30 volts at high duty cycles (LOOK IT UP UNLESS YOU WANT TO OWN SOMEONE ELSE'S DEAD WELDER), by all means go with the 1/16 wire.

      The positioner/live roller idea would be sweet if you were going to do more than 5-10 parts, but I agree that the setup time will be the killer.  A nice middle ground might be to use the trailer axle rollers, but in lieu of the electro-mechanicals you could go with something as simple as tacking short sections of angle to the perimeter of the roller next to each weld. These can be pushed with your foot or hand to advance to the next section, and they are easy to remove when you're done. Take some time to rig up a comfortable work platform with some sort of adjustable support for your arm that will permit easy access to the "positioners", then go to work.  As long as you can keep your arm steady and comfortable while doing all that, it won't be too bad.  Even if you have to stop and restart every 10 degrees, it won't take long to make a full rotation.

      Go burn wire!

      Brett


      On Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 12:00 PM, <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      15 New Messages

      Digest #4129
      1a
      Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
      1b
      Re: Ideas Needed by "Scott Trostel" blwloco
      1c
      Re: Ideas Needed by papermanfiler
      1d
      Re: Ideas Needed by redlupmi2
      1e
      Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
      1f
      Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
      1g
      Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
      1h
      Re: Ideas Needed by dhlh1984
      1i
      Re: Ideas Needed by dhlh1984
      1j
      Re: Ideas Needed by "Rupert" rwenig2
      1k
      Re: Ideas Needed by "Blair Bostick" bb768224
      1l
      Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
      1m
      Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
      1n
      Re: Ideas Needed by "Matthew Tinker" mattinker
      1o
      Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055

      Messages

      Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:19 am (PST) . Posted by:

      "StoneTool" owly055

      I have a large metal fabrication (non casting) project I need some
      ideas on. A customer of mine had a disaster with his land roller
      gang. This is a gang of 3 large land rollers used in farming. They
      are 54" diameter 1/2" wall steel pipe with axles and frames, filled with
      water and pulled with a large Steiger tractor. One is 14' long, and
      the other two are 10' long. These are massive!.
      An employee was instructed to drain them last fall, and reported
      that he had.......... when in fact he had not. All 3 froze and blew
      the ends out, which were half inch steel plate. The units were poorly
      made, having a 3" shaft for an axle, that was merely welded to the ends,
      and had gusset plates to make it rigid. Good rollers have an internal
      plate 18" or so inside the pipe, and an end plate, both with holes to
      retain the axle so that it is solid.

      My project will be to cut all 6 end plates out, and weld 12 new
      plates into the rollers, and build bearing assemblies. They used pillow
      block bearings instead of aluminum bronze bearings used in the better
      rollers. Both plates will be welded inside the pipe instead of having
      the outer one flush with the outer edge which causes breakage problems
      in the welds.

      That's 170' of weld just welding the ends into the rollers. I'll have
      considerably more than that with the spokes and stuff. I'll be
      getting some .062 dual shield mig wire, and doing it inside the shop to
      be out of the wind where I can use wire with gas. Good dual shield lays
      a superb bead and is all position.

      I'm going to flip a 14' tandem trailer I'm in the process of
      building (trailer house axles) upside down on the shop floor, and rest
      the pipes on the wheels of the trailer so I can turn them
      easily..........It probably won't be all that easy, but it will elevate
      the pipes and allow me to work in the flat position for most of my
      welds. What I haven't yet figured out is what I can use to rotate the
      pipe. I would like to be able to step on a pedal, and have the pipe
      creep around slowly as it turns on the wheels of the trailer. In a
      perfect world, I'd have a pickup axle for one axle, and an electric
      motor turning it through a belt drive......... but I don't have that.
      I may resort to some sort of pulley scabbed onto one wheel. If I was
      doing more than 3, I'd set up a submerged arc welder, a 5HP electric
      motor, and a cheap surplus ZTR pump and motor setup (surplus center),
      and fine tune the rotational speed so I could mount the mig gun and turn
      the pipe. A toggle switch would kick the mig on and off as the inner
      plate will have cut outs in it for the water to circulate through.

      As it is, I'm going to spend days and days welding using a hand
      held mig gun, but at least if I can turn the pipe with a foot switch, I
      will be able to really crank the power up, and run large wire. The
      welder is a Thermal Arc unit rated 400 amps. I'm going to have to look
      and see what the duty cycle is, but I suspect that I can easily run .062
      flux core or solid wire all day long, and I can crank the power and feed
      up. I'm not sure weather to run the flux core dual shield, which does
      an absolutely beautiful job and has excellent properties, or to try to
      achieve a spray transfer with solid wire. Esab offers some excellent
      dual shield wires that are designed to run on pure CO2........... that's
      a really cheap way to go for gas. The machine I will be using
      belongs to the customer, and has never had anything but .035 wire in it,
      so I have no idea how well it will handle .062........ I'd be reluctant
      to try .090 or .125 wire with it, though I have run the former on my
      machine at home (350 amp rated). I run .045 for almost everything on
      my own main shop welder, and I consider that a bit light for this job.

      Any ideas? I'm not looking forward to this job. It's
      just beyond a "normal repair", and just short of "production&quot;. For
      about $80, I can get a ZTR variable displacement pump from Surplus
      Center, and I own a fairly large hydraulic motor which would probably do
      the job.......but I don't have a suitable electric motor, and the
      fabrication time isn't really justified. I do have a couple of worm
      drive gear reduction boxes available, and an array of pulleys, and that
      would be pretty simple to knock together, and involve almost no cost and
      very little time. My trailer axles have to be mounted to channels
      because the spring pads are wider than the frame under the bed, so I can
      mount them and lay them sideways on top of my big trailer allowing me to
      load the pipes on the trailer and drag the trailer into the shop. That
      means I can have the project at a decent working height. I have a
      foot pedal on / off switch I can run the motor with........ mounted to
      my drill press (a wonderful innovation in terms of safety). I remove
      that and use it, along with the relay box I built to go with it, and use
      it to run the rotator.

      Is this being lazy or working smart???

      Howard

      Howard

      Howard

      Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:28 am (PST) . Posted by:

      "Scott Trostel" blwloco

      Howard:

      Can you boil this epistle down into something manageable to read . . . Please.  I spent many years in the welding business.  What AWS class of Dual Shield are you using?  What are the parent metals?

      Scott T

      On Monday, February 17, 2014 9:19 AM, StoneTool <owly@ttc-cmc.net> wrote:

       
      I have a large metal fabrication (non casting) project I need some
      ideas on. A customer of mine had a disaster with his land roller
      gang. This is a gang of 3 large land rollers used in farming. They
      are 54" diameter 1/2" wall steel pipe with axles and frames, filled with
      water and pulled with a large Steiger tractor. One is 14' long, and
      the other two are 10' long. These are massive!.
      An employee was instructed to drain them last fall, and reported
      that he had.......... when in fact he had not. All 3 froze and blew
      the ends out, which were half inch steel plate. The units were poorly
      made, having a 3" shaft for an axle, that was merely welded to the ends,
      and had gusset plates to make it rigid. Good rollers have an internal
      plate 18" or so inside the pipe, and an end plate, both with holes to
      retain the axle so that it is solid.

      My project will be to cut all 6 end plates out, and weld 12 new
      plates into the rollers, and build bearing assemblies. They used pillow
      block bearings instead of aluminum bronze bearings used in the better
      rollers. Both plates will be welded inside the pipe instead of having
      the outer one flush with the outer edge which causes breakage problems
      in the welds.

      That's 170' of weld just welding the ends into the rollers. I'll have
      considerably more than that with the spokes and stuff. I'll be
      getting some .062 dual shield mig wire, and doing it inside the shop to
      be out of the wind where I can use wire with gas. Good dual shield lays
      a superb bead and is all position.

      I'm going to flip a 14' tandem trailer I'm in the process of
      building (trailer house axles) upside down on the shop floor, and rest
      the pipes on the wheels of the trailer so I can turn them
      easily..........It probably won't be all that easy, but it will elevate
      the pipes and allow me to work in the flat position for most of my
      welds. What I haven't yet figured out is what I can use to rotate the
      pipe. I would like to be able to step on a pedal, and have the pipe
      creep around slowly as it turns on the wheels of the trailer. In a
      perfect world, I'd have a pickup axle for one axle, and an electric
      motor turning it through a belt drive......... but I don't have that.
      I may resort to some sort of pulley scabbed onto one wheel. If I was
      doing more than 3, I'd set up a submerged arc welder, a 5HP electric
      motor, and a cheap surplus ZTR pump and motor setup (surplus center),
      and fine tune the rotational speed so I could mount the mig gun and turn
      the pipe. A toggle switch would kick the mig on and off as the inner
      plate will have cut outs in it for the water to circulate through.

      As it is, I'm going to spend days and days welding using a hand
      held mig gun, but at least if I can turn the pipe with a foot switch, I
      will be able to really crank the power up, and run large wire. The
      welder is a Thermal Arc unit rated 400 amps. I'm going to have to look
      and see what the duty cycle is, but I suspect that I can easily run .062
      flux core or solid wire all day long, and I can crank the power and feed
      up. I'm not sure weather to run the flux core dual shield, which does
      an absolutely beautiful job and has excellent properties, or to try to
      achieve a spray transfer with solid wire. Esab offers some excellent
      dual shield wires that are designed to run on pure CO2........... that's
      a really cheap way to go for gas. The machine I will be using
      belongs to the customer, and has never had anything but .035 wire in it,
      so I have no idea how well it will handle .062........ I'd be reluctant
      to try .090 or .125 wire with it, though I have run the former on my
      machine at home (350 amp rated). I run .045 for almost everything on
      my own main shop welder, and I consider that a bit light for this job.

      Any ideas? I'm not looking forward to this job. It's
      just beyond a "normal repair", and just short of "production&quot;. For
      about $80, I can get a ZTR variable displacement pump from Surplus
      Center, and I own a fairly large hydraulic motor which would probably do
      the job.......but I don't have a suitable electric motor, and the
      fabrication time isn't really justified. I do have a couple of worm
      drive gear reduction boxes available, and an array of pulleys, and that
      would be pretty simple to knock together, and involve almost no cost and
      very little time. My trailer axles have to be mounted to channels
      because the spring pads are wider than the frame under the bed, so I can
      mount them and lay them sideways on top of my big trailer allowing me to
      load the pipes on the trailer and drag the trailer into the shop. That
      means I can have the project at a decent working height. I have a
      foot pedal on / off switch I can run the motor with........ mounted to
      my drill press (a wonderful innovation in terms of safety). I remove
      that and use it, along with the relay box I built to go with it, and use
      it to run the rotator.

      Is this being lazy or working smart???

      Howard

      Howard

      Howard

      Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:53 am (PST) . Posted by:

      papermanfiler

      Back to basis. 7/32 or 1/4 stick? Robert Kesling

      Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:00 am (PST) . Posted by:

      redlupmi2

      The trailer axle rollers will be a big help in this project, however the time to design a drive unit and set it up will not have a pay off unless you're going to make this a reoccurring job. For three rollers it will not pay back.

      Per my metallurgist friends say multiple passes of weld have better properties than a large single pass.

      Just put the helmet on and get this job done before it gets hot outside.

      R.T.

      Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:10 am (PST) . Posted by:

      "StoneTool" owly055

      There's no stick welder on site except a Miller Bobcat, and a bobcat
      won't run 1/4 stick, and I'm not bringing my PowCon over to do the
      job. I'll do it with wire...... at least most of it. I'll spot the
      disks in place and run large wire with a lot heat in a single
      pass.......more or less flat..... hence the rotator. If I didn't have
      wire available, I'd probably work with something like 7024........ as
      big as the Bobcat would run.

      Howard

      On 02/17/2014 07:39 AM, rkesling@packagingcorp.com wrote:
      >
      >
      > Back to basis. 7/32 or 1/4 stick? Robert Kesling
      >
      >
      >

      Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:18 am (PST) . Posted by:

      "StoneTool" owly055

      Scott:
      It's all mild steel.......... I haven't selected the dual shield
      yet........ I'll consult with a local expert. There is a really nice
      dual shield that will run on straight CO2 that Esab makes.......
      actually several. This is one I'm looking at:

      DUAL SHIELD II 71 ULTRA^®
      <http://esabna.com/us/en/products_catalog.cfm?Product_ID=241>

      <http://esabna.com/us/en/products_catalog.cfm?Product_ID=241>
      AWS A5.20: E71T-1CJ/T-9CJ/12CJ
      <http://esabna.com/us/en/products_catalog.cfm?Product_ID=241>
      <http://esabna.com/us/en/products_catalog.cfm?Product_ID=241>

      Dual Shield II 71 Ultra is an all-position flux cored wire that displays
      exceptional impact properties when used with CO2.
      <http://esabna.com/us/en/products_catalog.cfm?Product_ID=241>

      Howard

      On 02/17/2014 07:28 AM, Scott Trostel wrote:
      >
      >
      > Howard:
      >
      > Can you boil this epistle down into something manageable to read . . .
      > Please. I spent many years in the welding business. What AWS class
      > of Dual Shield are you using? What are the parent metals?
      >
      > Scott T
      >
      >
      >
      > On Monday, February 17, 2014 9:19 AM, StoneTool <owly@ttc-cmc.net> wrote:
      > I have a large metal fabrication (non casting) project I need some
      > ideas on. A customer of mine had a disaster with his land roller
      > gang. This is a gang of 3 large land rollers used in farming. They
      > are 54" diameter 1/2" wall steel pipe with axles and frames, filled with
      > water and pulled with a large Steiger tractor. One is 14' long, and
      > the other two are 10' long. These are massive!.
      > An employee was instructed to drain them last fall, and reported
      > that he had.......... when in fact he had not. All 3 froze and blew
      > the ends out, which were half inch steel plate. The units were poorly
      > made, having a 3" shaft for an axle, that was merely welded to the ends,
      > and had gusset plates to make it rigid. Good rollers have an internal
      > plate 18" or so inside the pipe, and an end plate, both with holes to
      > retain the axle so that it is solid.
      >
      > My project will be to cut all 6 end plates out, and weld 12 new
      > plates into the rollers, and build bearing assemblies. They used pillow
      > block bearings instead of aluminum bronze bearings used in the better
      > rollers. Both plates will be welded inside the pipe instead of having
      > the outer one flush with the outer edge which causes breakage problems
      > in the welds.
      >
      > That's 170' of weld just welding the ends into the rollers. I'll have
      > considerably more than that with the spokes and stuff. I'll be
      > getting some .062 dual shield mig wire, and doing it inside the shop to
      > be out of the wind where I can use wire with gas. Good dual shield lays
      > a superb bead and is all position.
      >
      > I'm going to flip a 14' tandem trailer I'm in the process of
      > building (trailer house axles) upside down on the shop floor, and rest
      > the pipes on the wheels of the trailer so I can turn them
      > easily..........It probably won't be all that easy, but it will elevate
      > the pipes and allow me to work in the flat position for most of my
      > welds. What I haven't yet figured out is what I can use to rotate the
      > pipe. I would like to be able to step on a pedal, and have the pipe
      > creep around slowly as it turns on the wheels of the trailer. In a
      > perfect world, I'd have a pickup axle for one axle, and an electric
      > motor turning it through a belt drive......... but I don't have that.
      > I may resort to some sort of pulley scabbed onto one wheel. If I was
      > doing more than 3, I'd set up a submerged arc welder, a 5HP electric
      > motor, and a cheap surplus ZTR pump and motor setup (surplus center),
      > and fine tune the rotational speed so I could mount the mig gun and turn
      > the pipe. A toggle switch would kick the mig on and off as the inner
      > plate will have cut outs in it for the water to circulate through.
      >
      > As it is, I'm going to spend days and days welding using a hand
      > held mig gun, but at least if I can turn the pipe with a foot switch, I
      > will be able to really crank the power up, and run large wire. The
      > welder is a Thermal Arc unit rated 400 amps. I'm going to have to look
      > and see what the duty cycle is, but I suspect that I can easily run .062
      > flux core or solid wire all day long, and I can crank the power and feed
      > up. I'm not sure weather to run the flux core dual shield, which does
      > an absolutely beautiful job and has excellent properties, or to try to
      > achieve a spray transfer with solid wire. Esab offers some excellent
      > dual shield wires that are designed to run on pure CO2........... that's
      > a really cheap way to go for gas. The machine I will be using
      > belongs to the customer, and has never had anything but .035 wire in it,
      > so I have no idea how well it will handle .062........ I'd be reluctant
      > to try .090 or .125 wire with it, though I have run the former on my
      > machine at home (350 amp rated). I run .045 for almost everything on
      > my own main shop welder, and I consider that a bit light for this job.
      >
      > Any ideas? I'm not looking forward to this job. It's
      > just beyond a "normal repair", and just short of "production&quot;. For
      > about $80, I can get a ZTR variable displacement pump from Surplus
      > Center, and I own a fairly large hydraulic motor which would probably do
      > the job.......but I don't have a suitable electric motor, and the
      > fabrication time isn't really justified. I do have a couple of worm
      > drive gear reduction boxes available, and an array of pulleys, and that
      > would be pretty simple to knock together, and involve almost no cost and
      > very little time. My trailer axles have to be mounted to channels
      > because the spring pads are wider than the frame under the bed, so I can
      > mount them and lay them sideways on top of my big trailer allowing me to
      > load the pipes on the trailer and drag the trailer into the shop. That
      > means I can have the project at a decent working height. I have a
      > foot pedal on / off switch I can run the motor with........ mounted to
      > my drill press (a wonderful innovation in terms of safety). I remove
      > that and use it, along with the relay box I built to go with it, and use
      > it to run the rotator.
      >
      > Is this being lazy or working smart???
      >
      > Howard
      >
      > Howard
      >
      > Howard
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

    • StoneTool
      Brett: Since I wrote earlier I uncovered a forgotten 12 volt winch............. perfect for rotation. I have enough electronic pieces on my desk right here
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 17, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        Brett:
           
            Since I wrote earlier I uncovered a forgotten 12 volt winch............. perfect for rotation.   I have enough electronic pieces on my desk right here to build a very simple PWM circuit so I could actually control rotation rate.

            The welder is rated 300 amp @ 40%, 250 @ 60%, and 195@100%   The wire I am currently looking at is Esab 710X which is a flux core dual shield wire.    Esab lists 20-26.2 volts,   127-263 amps, and 98-250 IPM wire speed for their 1/16 wire on CO2.   The specs on the inside cover of the machine list both flux core and solid wire at 1/16.   Looking at the duty cycle, I would say there is no problem at all here unless one decides to really crank it.   The machine is a Thermal Arc Fabricator 281 an inverter type welder with an external feeder....... It's hardly a toy.   It's in the same class as my PowCon, and I would have no hesitation about running it on that.   I've run .090 flux core before.  


                                                                                        Howard


        On 02/17/2014 08:36 PM, Brett Phillips wrote:
        I'm a CWI in a weld shop in VA. We would likely run either a COREX Versatile E71-T1xxx wire or its' Select Arc equivalent:


        If your power supply can hack 350 Amps and 30 volts at high duty cycles (LOOK IT UP UNLESS YOU WANT TO OWN SOMEONE ELSE'S DEAD WELDER), by all means go with the 1/16 wire.

        The positioner/live roller idea would be sweet if you were going to do more than 5-10 parts, but I agree that the setup time will be the killer.  A nice middle ground might be to use the trailer axle rollers, but in lieu of the electro-mechanicals you could go with something as simple as tacking short sections of angle to the perimeter of the roller next to each weld. These can be pushed with your foot or hand to advance to the next section, and they are easy to remove when you're done. Take some time to rig up a comfortable work platform with some sort of adjustable support for your arm that will permit easy access to the "positioners", then go to work.  As long as you can keep your arm steady and comfortable while doing all that, it won't be too bad.  Even if you have to stop and restart every 10 degrees, it won't take long to make a full rotation.

        Go burn wire!

        Brett


        On Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 12:00 PM, <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        15 New Messages

        Digest #4129
        1a
        Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
        1b
        Re: Ideas Needed by "Scott Trostel" blwloco
        1c
        Re: Ideas Needed by papermanfiler
        1d
        Re: Ideas Needed by redlupmi2
        1e
        Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
        1f
        Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
        1g
        Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
        1h
        Re: Ideas Needed by dhlh1984
        1i
        Re: Ideas Needed by dhlh1984
        1j
        Re: Ideas Needed by "Rupert" rwenig2
        1k
        Re: Ideas Needed by "Blair Bostick" bb768224
        1l
        Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
        1m
        Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055
        1n
        Re: Ideas Needed by "Matthew Tinker" mattinker
        1o
        Re: Ideas Needed by "StoneTool" owly055

        Messages

        Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:19 am (PST) . Posted by:

        "StoneTool" owly055

        I have a large metal fabrication (non casting) project I need some
        ideas on. A customer of mine had a disaster with his land roller
        gang. This is a gang of 3 large land rollers used in farming. They
        are 54" diameter 1/2" wall steel pipe with axles and frames, filled with
        water and pulled with a large Steiger tractor. One is 14' long, and
        the other two are 10' long. These are massive!.
        An employee was instructed to drain them last fall, and reported
        that he had.......... when in fact he had not. All 3 froze and blew
        the ends out, which were half inch steel plate. The units were poorly
        made, having a 3" shaft for an axle, that was merely welded to the ends,
        and had gusset plates to make it rigid. Good rollers have an internal
        plate 18" or so inside the pipe, and an end plate, both with holes to
        retain the axle so that it is solid.

        My project will be to cut all 6 end plates out, and weld 12 new
        plates into the rollers, and build bearing assemblies. They used pillow
        block bearings instead of aluminum bronze bearings used in the better
        rollers. Both plates will be welded inside the pipe instead of having
        the outer one flush with the outer edge which causes breakage problems
        in the welds.

        That's 170' of weld just welding the ends into the rollers. I'll have
        considerably more than that with the spokes and stuff. I'll be
        getting some .062 dual shield mig wire, and doing it inside the shop to
        be out of the wind where I can use wire with gas. Good dual shield lays
        a superb bead and is all position.

        I'm going to flip a 14' tandem trailer I'm in the process of
        building (trailer house axles) upside down on the shop floor, and rest
        the pipes on the wheels of the trailer so I can turn them
        easily..........It probably won't be all that easy, but it will elevate
        the pipes and allow me to work in the flat position for most of my
        welds. What I haven't yet figured out is what I can use to rotate the
        pipe. I would like to be able to step on a pedal, and have the pipe
        creep around slowly as it turns on the wheels of the trailer. In a
        perfect world, I'd have a pickup axle for one axle, and an electric
        motor turning it through a belt drive......... but I don't have that.
        I may resort to some sort of pulley scabbed onto one wheel. If I was
        doing more than 3, I'd set up a submerged arc welder, a 5HP electric
        motor, and a cheap surplus ZTR pump and motor setup (surplus center),
        and fine tune the rotational speed so I could mount the mig gun and turn
        the pipe. A toggle switch would kick the mig on and off as the inner
        plate will have cut outs in it for the water to circulate through.

        As it is, I'm going to spend days and days welding using a hand
        held mig gun, but at least if I can turn the pipe with a foot switch, I
        will be able to really crank the power up, and run large wire. The
        welder is a Thermal Arc unit rated 400 amps. I'm going to have to look
        and see what the duty cycle is, but I suspect that I can easily run .062
        flux core or solid wire all day long, and I can crank the power and feed
        up. I'm not sure weather to run the flux core dual shield, which does
        an absolutely beautiful job and has excellent properties, or to try to
        achieve a spray transfer with solid wire. Esab offers some excellent
        dual shield wires that are designed to run on pure CO2........... that's
        a really cheap way to go for gas. The machine I will be using
        belongs to the customer, and has never had anything but .035 wire in it,
        so I have no idea how well it will handle .062........ I'd be reluctant
        to try .090 or .125 wire with it, though I have run the former on my
        machine at home (350 amp rated). I run .045 for almost everything on
        my own main shop welder, and I consider that a bit light for this job.

        Any ideas? I'm not looking forward to this job. It's
        just beyond a "normal repair", and just short of "production&quot;. For
        about $80, I can get a ZTR variable displacement pump from Surplus
        Center, and I own a fairly large hydraulic motor which would probably do
        the job.......but I don't have a suitable electric motor, and the
        fabrication time isn't really justified. I do have a couple of worm
        drive gear reduction boxes available, and an array of pulleys, and that
        would be pretty simple to knock together, and involve almost no cost and
        very little time. My trailer axles have to be mounted to channels
        because the spring pads are wider than the frame under the bed, so I can
        mount them and lay them sideways on top of my big trailer allowing me to
        load the pipes on the trailer and drag the trailer into the shop. That
        means I can have the project at a decent working height. I have a
        foot pedal on / off switch I can run the motor with........ mounted to
        my drill press (a wonderful innovation in terms of safety). I remove
        that and use it, along with the relay box I built to go with it, and use
        it to run the rotator.

        Is this being lazy or working smart???

        Howard

        Howard

        Howard

        Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:28 am (PST) . Posted by:

        "Scott Trostel" blwloco

        Howard:

        Can you boil this epistle down into something manageable to read . . . Please.  I spent many years in the welding business.  What AWS class of Dual Shield are you using?  What are the parent metals?

        Scott T

        On Monday, February 17, 2014 9:19 AM, StoneTool <owly@...> wrote:

         
        I have a large metal fabrication (non casting) project I need some
        ideas on. A customer of mine had a disaster with his land roller
        gang. This is a gang of 3 large land rollers used in farming. They
        are 54" diameter 1/2" wall steel pipe with axles and frames, filled with
        water and pulled with a large Steiger tractor. One is 14' long, and
        the other two are 10' long. These are massive!.
        An employee was instructed to drain them last fall, and reported
        that he had.......... when in fact he had not. All 3 froze and blew
        the ends out, which were half inch steel plate. The units were poorly
        made, having a 3" shaft for an axle, that was merely welded to the ends,
        and had gusset plates to make it rigid. Good rollers have an internal
        plate 18" or so inside the pipe, and an end plate, both with holes to
        retain the axle so that it is solid.

        My project will be to cut all 6 end plates out, and weld 12 new
        plates into the rollers, and build bearing assemblies. They used pillow
        block bearings instead of aluminum bronze bearings used in the better
        rollers. Both plates will be welded inside the pipe instead of having
        the outer one flush with the outer edge which causes breakage problems
        in the welds.

        That's 170' of weld just welding the ends into the rollers. I'll have
        considerably more than that with the spokes and stuff. I'll be
        getting some .062 dual shield mig wire, and doing it inside the shop to
        be out of the wind where I can use wire with gas. Good dual shield lays
        a superb bead and is all position.

        I'm going to flip a 14' tandem trailer I'm in the process of
        building (trailer house axles) upside down on the shop floor, and rest
        the pipes on the wheels of the trailer so I can turn them
        easily..........It probably won't be all that easy, but it will elevate
        the pipes and allow me to work in the flat position for most of my
        welds. What I haven't yet figured out is what I can use to rotate the
        pipe. I would like to be able to step on a pedal, and have the pipe
        creep around slowly as it turns on the wheels of the trailer. In a
        perfect world, I'd have a pickup axle for one axle, and an electric
        motor turning it through a belt drive......... but I don't have that.
        I may resort to some sort of pulley scabbed onto one wheel. If I was
        doing more than 3, I'd set up a submerged arc welder, a 5HP electric
        motor, and a cheap surplus ZTR pump and motor setup (surplus center),
        and fine tune the rotational speed so I could mount the mig gun and turn
        the pipe. A toggle switch would kick the mig on and off as the inner
        plate will have cut outs in it for the water to circulate through.

        As it is, I'm going to spend days and days welding using a hand
        held mig gun, but at least if I can turn the pipe with a foot switch, I
        will be able to really crank the power up, and run large wire. The
        welder is a Thermal Arc unit rated 400 amps. I'm going to have to look
        and see what the duty cycle is, but I suspect that I can easily run .062
        flux core or solid wire all day long, and I can crank the power and feed
        up. I'm not sure weather to run the flux core dual shield, which does
        an absolutely beautiful job and has excellent properties, or to try to
        achieve a spray transfer with solid wire. Esab offers some excellent
        dual shield wires that are designed to run on pure CO2........... that's
        a really cheap way to go for gas. The machine I will be using
        belongs to the customer, and has never had anything but .035 wire in it,
        so I have no idea how well it will handle .062........ I'd be reluctant
        to try .090 or .125 wire with it, though I have run the former on my
        machine at home (350 amp rated). I run .045 for almost everything on
        my own main shop welder, and I consider that a bit light for this job.

        Any ideas? I'm not looking forward to this job. It's
        just beyond a "normal repair", and just short of "production&quot;. For
        about $80, I can get a ZTR variable displacement pump from Surplus
        Center, and I own a fairly large hydraulic motor which would probably do
        the job.......but I don't have a suitable electric motor, and the
        fabrication time isn't really justified. I do have a couple of worm
        drive gear reduction boxes available, and an array of pulleys, and that
        would be pretty simple to knock together, and involve almost no cost and
        very little time. My trailer axles have to be mounted to channels
        because the spring pads are wider than the frame under the bed, so I can
        mount them and lay them sideways on top of my big trailer allowing me to
        load the pipes on the trailer and drag the trailer into the shop. That
        means I can have the project at a decent working height. I have a
        foot pedal on / off switch I can run the motor with........ mounted to
        my drill press (a wonderful innovation in terms of safety). I remove
        that and use it, along with the relay box I built to go with it, and use
        it to run the rotator.

        Is this being lazy or working smart???

        Howard

        Howard

        Howard

        Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:53 am (PST) . Posted by:

        papermanfiler

        Back to basis. 7/32 or 1/4 stick? Robert Kesling

        Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:00 am (PST) . Posted by:

        redlupmi2



        (Message over 64 KB, truncated)
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.