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"J" type sprue

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  • Rupert
    Hello Guys, Just wondering if anyone has attempted using a J type sprue in any of your molds. If so, how did you do it? A J sprue would work best for the
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 10, 2013
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      Hello Guys,
      Just wondering if anyone has attempted using a "J" type sprue in any of
      your molds. If so, how did you do it? A "J" sprue would work best for
      the pattern I'm trying to cast as I could then sprue to an area I have
      to machine anyway.

      Rupert
      --

      yvt

      Rupert Wenig
      Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

      email: rwenig2@...

      http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
    • Dennis
      I would also be interested in knowing how it s done the right way.. Rupert what is it your molding? Dennis
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 10, 2013
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        I would also be interested in knowing how it's done the right way.. 
        Rupert what is it your molding?

        Dennis

        On Dec 10, 2013, at 9:16 PM, Rupert <rwenig2@...> wrote:

         

        Hello Guys,
        Just wondering if anyone has attempted using a "J" type sprue in any of
        your molds. If so, how did you do it? A "J" sprue would work best for
        the pattern I'm trying to cast as I could then sprue to an area I have
        to machine anyway.

        Rupert
        --

        yvt

        Rupert Wenig
        Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

        email: rwenig2@...

        http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/

      • Chris Bailey
        Guys, you might look up the term Horn Sprue . I think that s another name for what you re looking for. Chris
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 10, 2013
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          Guys, you might look up the term "Horn Sprue".  I think that's another name for what you're looking for. 


          Chris



          On Tue, Dec 10, 2013 at 8:25 PM, Dennis <volcom7114@...> wrote:
           

          I would also be interested in knowing how it's done the right way.. 
          Rupert what is it your molding?

          Dennis

          On Dec 10, 2013, at 9:16 PM, Rupert <rwenig2@...> wrote:

           

          Hello Guys,
          Just wondering if anyone has attempted using a "J" type sprue in any of
          your molds. If so, how did you do it? A "J" sprue would work best for
          the pattern I'm trying to cast as I could then sprue to an area I have
          to machine anyway.

          Rupert
          --

          yvt

          Rupert Wenig
          Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

          email: rwenig2@...

          http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/


        • Rupert
          I m building a CNC router table with a crazy idea of busing only aluminum castings in the construction. The casting I m working on now is the end plate of the
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 10, 2013
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            I'm building a CNC router table with a crazy idea of busing only
            aluminum castings in the construction. The casting I'm working on now is
            the end plate of the main frame. It measures 10" x 26" with most of the
            centre cut out. I used webs in the pattern for strengthening and to cut
            down on weight. This casting tests my crucible to the max limit as it
            weighs 11 lbs. There are only three areas that need machining. The
            measure roughly 2" x 4". I suppose I could turn the pattern over placing
            it in the cope but that would mean building a new higher cope. Don't
            really want to do that as the complete flask filled with rammed sand
            weighs 200 lbs or more already. Placing the pattern in the drag means
            the areas to be machined are on the bottom. That is why I thought to try
            a "J" type (or horn) sprue.
            I'll try to put up some pictures tomorrow.
            Rupert

            On 12/10/2013 7:25 PM, Dennis wrote:
            >
            >
            > I would also be interested in knowing how it's done the right way..
            > Rupert what is it your molding?
            >
            > Dennis
            --

            yvt

            Rupert Wenig
            Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

            email: rwenig2@...

            http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
          • Rupert
            Thanks Chris. I knew that but couldn t think of it when I asked the question. The Navy Manual shows pictures of a horn sprue but I couldn t find where they
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 10, 2013
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              Thanks Chris. I knew that but couldn't think of it when I asked the
              question. The Navy Manual shows pictures of a horn sprue but I couldn't
              find where they describe how to do it. They do however mention some
              advantages and disadvantages of using bottom sprues.

              Rupert



              On 12/10/2013 8:00 PM, Chris Bailey wrote:
              >
              >
              > Guys, you might look up the term "Horn Sprue". I think that's another
              > name for what you're looking for.
              >
              >
              > Chris
              >
              >
              --

              yvt

              Rupert Wenig
              Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

              email: rwenig2@...

              http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
            • Dennis
              Very cool pics would be great I m somewhat new to the back yard foundry stuff but been around a machine shop/gun smithing all my life and I got hurt some years
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 10, 2013
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                Very cool pics would be great I'm somewhat new to the back yard foundry stuff but been around a machine shop/gun smithing all my life and I got hurt some years back (nerve damage from my legs down to the feet) so now my machine shop is my full time hobby along with being a full time stay at home dad never missed working so much in my life tho for sure but anyway I built two furnaces one large it can hold up to a #40 crucible and the other much small able to hold a # 10 crucible my large furnace is a waste oil burner and the small runs on LPG but I would love to make a smaller waste oil burner for it but have not been successful in making a GOOD smaller burner for some reason I guess I just have to keep playing but I'm interested in your build I love making my own tools:) 

                Dennis

                On Dec 10, 2013, at 11:19 PM, Rupert <rwenig2@...> wrote:

                 

                I'm building a CNC router table with a crazy idea of busing only
                aluminum castings in the construction. The casting I'm working on now is
                the end plate of the main frame. It measures 10" x 26" with most of the
                centre cut out. I used webs in the pattern for strengthening and to cut
                down on weight. This casting tests my crucible to the max limit as it
                weighs 11 lbs. There are only three areas that need machining. The
                measure roughly 2" x 4". I suppose I could turn the pattern over placing
                it in the cope but that would mean building a new higher cope. Don't
                really want to do that as the complete flask filled with rammed sand
                weighs 200 lbs or more already. Placing the pattern in the drag means
                the areas to be machined are on the bottom. That is why I thought to try
                a "J" type (or horn) sprue.
                I'll try to put up some pictures tomorrow.
                Rupert

                On 12/10/2013 7:25 PM, Dennis wrote:
                >
                >
                > I would also be interested in knowing how it's done the right way..
                > Rupert what is it your molding?
                >
                > Dennis
                --

                yvt

                Rupert Wenig
                Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

                email: rwenig2@...

                http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/

              • Rupert
                Hello Dennis, Sorry to hear about your leg problems. Hope you health is good otherwise. I posted 3 pictures in my folder in the photos section. The scrap for
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                  Hello Dennis,
                  Sorry to hear about your leg problems. Hope you health is good otherwise.

                  I posted 3 pictures in my folder in the photos section. The scrap for
                  all the castings is/was old auto pistons.

                  My furnace is a Gingery propane fired design. It's designed for a #8
                  crucible but I can get a larger pipe crucible in it that will hold up to
                  12# if it is brimmed.

                  Rupert

                  On 12/10/2013 10:02 PM, Dennis wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Very cool pics would be great I'm somewhat new to the back yard foundry
                  > stuff but been around a machine shop/gun smithing all my life and I got
                  > hurt some years back (nerve damage from my legs down to the feet) so now
                  > my machine shop is my full time hobby along with being a full time stay
                  > at home dad never missed working so much in my life tho for sure but
                  > anyway I built two furnaces one large it can hold up to a #40 crucible
                  > and the other much small able to hold a # 10 crucible my large furnace
                  > is a waste oil burner and the small runs on LPG but I would love to make
                  > a smaller waste oil burner for it but have not been successful in making
                  > a GOOD smaller burner for some reason I guess I just have to keep
                  > playing but I'm interested in your build I love making my own tools:)
                  >
                  > Dennis

                  --

                  yvt

                  Rupert Wenig
                  Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

                  email: rwenig2@...

                  http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
                • Ron Thompson
                  ... Funny you should be on this track. I have just started to copy the cast cnc castings, myself. (The seller is not taking new orders.) I am using my small
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                    On 12/10/2013 11:19 PM, Rupert wrote:
                    > I'm building a CNC router table with a crazy idea of busing only
                    > aluminum castings in the construction.
                    Funny you should be on this track. I have just started to copy the "cast
                    cnc" castings, myself. (The seller is not taking new orders.)
                    I am using my small cnc router to make patterns from MDF.
                    http://www.castcnc.com/box.html
                    The plan is to make a Jos's 4x4 rack and pinion cnc router similar to
                    this one:
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rBTJyOaeWY&html5=1

                    --


                    Ron Thompson
                    On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

                    Think, Draw, Print. 3D printers ROCK!

                    http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/PrusaMendel2012-1/

                    http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
                    http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

                    Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
                    http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/
                  • Dennis
                    May I ask I m haven t got into CNC even tho I do know g-code and have Bobcad and inventor pro I have yet to turn my lathe or mill into CNC but I wanted to make
                    Message 9 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                      May I ask I'm haven't got into CNC even tho I do know g-code and have Bobcad and inventor pro I have yet to turn my lathe or mill into CNC but I wanted to make a small CNC table something like 3'x 3' what stepper motors and such would be best I'm far from rich like most of us but I do have a means of making my own parts and casting alike so where do you even start with a CNC table that I could use my router on and also be able to take it off and say take out the wood bottom and put a sheet of steel plate or rather a steel grid to lay in so it could be used for both?? I have a lot of older home use jet printers now I would say that the stepper motors would be way to small but Im not sure this is kinda new to me...

                      Dennis

                      On Dec 11, 2013, at 7:40 AM, Ron Thompson <ron@...> wrote:

                       

                      On 12/10/2013 11:19 PM, Rupert wrote:
                      > I'm building a CNC router table with a crazy idea of busing only
                      > aluminum castings in the construction.
                      Funny you should be on this track. I have just started to copy the "cast
                      cnc" castings, myself. (The seller is not taking new orders.)
                      I am using my small cnc router to make patterns from MDF.
                      http://www.castcnc.com/box.html
                      The plan is to make a Jos's 4x4 rack and pinion cnc router similar to
                      this one:
                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rBTJyOaeWY&html5=1

                      --

                      Ron Thompson
                      On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

                      Think, Draw, Print. 3D printers ROCK!

                      http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/PrusaMendel2012-1/

                      http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
                      http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

                      Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
                      http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/

                    • Ron Thompson
                      ... Dennis, I saw this, but am on my way to work. I ll give a more complete reply later. -- Ron Thompson On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the
                      Message 10 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                        On 12/11/2013 7:53 AM, Dennis wrote:
                        > May I ask I'm haven't got into CNC even tho I do know g-code and have
                        > Bobcad and inventor pro I have yet to turn my lathe or mill into CNC
                        > but I wanted to make a small CNC table something like 3'x 3' what
                        > stepper motors and such would be best I'm far from rich like most of
                        > us but I do have a means of making my own parts and casting alike so
                        > where do you even start with a CNC table that I could use my router on
                        > and also be able to take it off and say take out the wood bottom and
                        > put a sheet of steel plate or rather a steel grid to lay in so it
                        > could be used for both?? I have a lot of older home use jet printers
                        > now I would say that the stepper motors would be way to small but Im
                        > not sure this is kinda new to me...
                        >
                        > Dennis
                        >
                        Dennis,
                        I saw this, but am on my way to work.
                        I'll give a more complete reply later.

                        --


                        Ron Thompson
                        On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

                        Think, Draw, Print. 3D printers ROCK!

                        http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/PrusaMendel2012-1/

                        http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
                        http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

                        Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
                        http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/
                      • Dennis
                        That s fine no hurry :)
                        Message 11 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                          That's fine no hurry :)

                          On Dec 11, 2013, at 8:39 AM, Ron Thompson <ron@...> wrote:

                           

                          On 12/11/2013 7:53 AM, Dennis wrote:
                          > May I ask I'm haven't got into CNC even tho I do know g-code and have
                          > Bobcad and inventor pro I have yet to turn my lathe or mill into CNC
                          > but I wanted to make a small CNC table something like 3'x 3' what
                          > stepper motors and such would be best I'm far from rich like most of
                          > us but I do have a means of making my own parts and casting alike so
                          > where do you even start with a CNC table that I could use my router on
                          > and also be able to take it off and say take out the wood bottom and
                          > put a sheet of steel plate or rather a steel grid to lay in so it
                          > could be used for both?? I have a lot of older home use jet printers
                          > now I would say that the stepper motors would be way to small but Im
                          > not sure this is kinda new to me...
                          >
                          > Dennis
                          >
                          Dennis,
                          I saw this, but am on my way to work.
                          I'll give a more complete reply later.

                          --

                          Ron Thompson
                          On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

                          Think, Draw, Print. 3D printers ROCK!

                          http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/PrusaMendel2012-1/

                          http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
                          http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

                          Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
                          http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/

                        • David Knaack
                          If you haven t seen it before, you like http://www.cnczone.com/forums/ You probably wouldn t find advice precisely for what you are doing, but there is a ton
                          Message 12 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                            If you haven't seen it before, you like http://www.cnczone.com/forums/
                            You probably wouldn't find advice precisely for what you are doing, but there is a ton of great background info, and lots of ideas you might be able to use for your design.


                            On Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 6:53 AM, Dennis <volcom7114@...> wrote:
                             

                            May I ask I'm haven't got into CNC even tho I do know g-code and have Bobcad and inventor pro I have yet to turn my lathe or mill into CNC but I wanted to make a small CNC table something like 3'x 3' what stepper motors and such would be best I'm far from rich like most of us but I do have a means of making my own parts and casting alike so where do you even start with a CNC table that I could use my router on and also be able to take it off and say take out the wood bottom and put a sheet of steel plate or rather a steel grid to lay in so it could be used for both?? I have a lot of older home use jet printers now I would say that the stepper motors would be way to small but Im not sure this is kinda new to me...

                            Dennis

                          • Dennis
                            I am a member of that forum a lot of great info there and may be someone who has played around with something like that but really from the machinist to metal
                            Message 13 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                              I am a member of that forum a lot of great info there and may be someone who has played around with something like that but really from the machinist to metal foundry casting and other machines they all really go hand and hand that's the great thing about this hobbie. :) 

                              On Dec 11, 2013, at 10:11 AM, David Knaack <davidknaack@...> wrote:

                               

                              If you haven't seen it before, you like http://www.cnczone.com/forums/
                              You probably wouldn't find advice precisely for what you are doing, but there is a ton of great background info, and lots of ideas you might be able to use for your design.


                              On Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 6:53 AM, Dennis <volcom7114@...> wrote:
                               

                              May I ask I'm haven't got into CNC even tho I do know g-code and have Bobcad and inventor pro I have yet to turn my lathe or mill into CNC but I wanted to make a small CNC table something like 3'x 3' what stepper motors and such would be best I'm far from rich like most of us but I do have a means of making my own parts and casting alike so where do you even start with a CNC table that I could use my router on and also be able to take it off and say take out the wood bottom and put a sheet of steel plate or rather a steel grid to lay in so it could be used for both?? I have a lot of older home use jet printers now I would say that the stepper motors would be way to small but Im not sure this is kinda new to me...

                              Dennis

                            • mikey98118
                              Dennis, The easiest way to make a good smaller burner is to use a propane burning design. However, someone already into used oil burners would probably hate
                              Message 14 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                                Dennis,
                                The easiest way to make a "good" smaller burner is to use a propane burning design.
                                 
                                However, someone already into used oil burners would probably hate being reduced to paying for fuel gas. In such case, your most probable choice would be a not-so-standard kerosene burner (blow gun). Although previous attempts at powering small furnaces with gasoline or kerosene blow guns produced low end performance, according to their own builders (see on you-tube), this (in MHO) is do to their sloppy installation at the mouths of openings in these furnaces, rather than into dedicated burner ports. Adequately sealing the burner and furnace connection against entrainment of unlimited secondary air should raise performance to satisfactory levels.
                                 
                                Warning: Old gasoline and kerosene blow guns make a poor choice for safety (bad seals): these tools are still made in India and China. I suggest you at least spring for a new gun. I would further suggest you unscrew the burner head from the fuel tank, and separate them with pipe or hose rated for petroleum fuels.
                                Mikey
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Dennis <volcom7114@...>
                                To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 05:02:36 -0000 (UTC)
                                Subject: Re: [hobbicast] "J" type sprue
                                 
                                Very cool pics would be great I'm somewhat new to the back yard foundry stuff but been around a machine shop/gun smithing all my life and I got hurt some years back (nerve damage from my legs down to the feet) so now my machine shop is my full time hobby along with being a full time stay at home dad never missed working so much in my life tho for sure but anyway I built two furnaces one large it can hold up to a #40 crucible and the other much small able to hold a # 10 crucible my large furnace is a waste oil burner and the small runs on LPG but I would love to make a smaller waste oil burner for it but have not been successful in making a GOOD smaller burner for some reason I guess I just have to keep playing but I'm interested in your build I love making my own tools:) 
                                Dennis

                                On Dec 10, 2013, at 11:19 PM, Rupert <rwenig2@...> wrote:
                                 

                                I'm building a CNC router table with a crazy idea of busing only

                                aluminum castings in the construction. The casting I'm working on now is

                                the end plate of the main frame. It measures 10" x 26" with most of the

                                centre cut out. I used webs in the pattern for strengthening and to cut

                                down on weight. This casting tests my crucible to the max limit as it

                                weighs 11 lbs. There are only three areas that need machining. The

                                measure roughly 2" x 4". I suppose I could turn the pattern over placing

                                it in the cope but that would mean building a new higher cope. Don't

                                really want to do that as the complete flask filled with rammed sand

                                weighs 200 lbs or more already. Placing the pattern in the drag means

                                the areas to be machined are on the bottom. That is why I thought to try

                                a "J" type (or horn) sprue.

                                I'll try to put up some pictures tomorrow.

                                Rupert


                                On 12/10/2013 7:25 PM, Dennis wrote:

                                >

                                >

                                > I would also be interested in knowing how it's done the right way..

                                > Rupert what is it your molding?

                                >

                                > Dennis

                                --


                                yvt


                                Rupert Wenig

                                Camrose, Alberta, Canada.


                                email: rwenig2@...

                                http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/

                              • mikey98118
                                ... Very cool pics would be great I m somewhat new to the back yard foundry stuff but been around a machine shop/gun smithing all my life and I got hurt some
                                Message 15 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Dennis <volcom7114@...>
                                  To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 05:02:36 -0000 (UTC)
                                  Subject: Re: [hobbicast] "J" type sprue
                                   
                                  Very cool pics would be great I'm somewhat new to the back yard foundry stuff but been around a machine shop/gun smithing all my life and I got hurt some years back (nerve damage from my legs down to the feet) so now my machine shop is my full time hobby along with being a full time stay at home dad never missed working so much in my life tho for sure but anyway I built two furnaces one large it can hold up to a #40 crucible and the other much small able to hold a # 10 crucible my large furnace is a waste oil burner and the small runs on LPG but I would love to make a smaller waste oil burner for it but have not been successful in making a GOOD smaller burner for some reason I guess I just have to keep playing but I'm interested in your build I love making my own tools:) 
                                  Dennis

                                  On Dec 10, 2013, at 11:19 PM, Rupert <rwenig2@...> wrote:
                                   

                                  I'm building a CNC router table with a crazy idea of busing only

                                  aluminum castings in the construction. The casting I'm working on now is

                                  the end plate of the main frame. It measures 10" x 26" with most of the

                                  centre cut out. I used webs in the pattern for strengthening and to cut

                                  down on weight. This casting tests my crucible to the max limit as it

                                  weighs 11 lbs. There are only three areas that need machining. The

                                  measure roughly 2" x 4". I suppose I could turn the pattern over placing

                                  it in the cope but that would mean building a new higher cope. Don't

                                  really want to do that as the complete flask filled with rammed sand

                                  weighs 200 lbs or more already. Placing the pattern in the drag means

                                  the areas to be machined are on the bottom. That is why I thought to try

                                  a "J" type (or horn) sprue.

                                  I'll try to put up some pictures tomorrow.

                                  Rupert


                                  On 12/10/2013 7:25 PM, Dennis wrote:

                                  >

                                  >

                                  > I would also be interested in knowing how it's done the right way..

                                  > Rupert what is it your molding?

                                  >

                                  > Dennis

                                  --


                                  yvt


                                  Rupert Wenig

                                  Camrose, Alberta, Canada.


                                  email: rwenig2@...

                                  http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/

                                • Rupert
                                  Hello Ron, I looked at that one too before I decided to pattern mine after my old Router table which is a JGRO. The JGRO works fine but the accuracy is
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                                    Hello Ron,
                                    I looked at that one too before I decided to pattern mine after my old
                                    Router table which is a JGRO. The JGRO works fine but the accuracy is
                                    affected by humidity changes more than I was happy with. Thus, I decided
                                    to build a new machine out of castings. I had to limit the size to the
                                    capacity of my furnace so that set the maximum size. I'm still learning
                                    CNC so I didn't want to venture to far from what I knew on another
                                    design. I did do some modifications though to get more work area out of
                                    the table size. I should have a work are of 18 in. x 56 in. if I
                                    calculated correctly.

                                    Are planning to post pictures of your build?

                                    Rupert


                                    On 12/11/2013 5:40 AM, Ron Thompson wrote:
                                    > On 12/10/2013 11:19 PM, Rupert wrote:
                                    >> I'm building a CNC router table with a crazy idea of busing only
                                    >> aluminum castings in the construction.
                                    > Funny you should be on this track. I have just started to copy the "cast
                                    > cnc" castings, myself. (The seller is not taking new orders.)
                                    > I am using my small cnc router to make patterns from MDF.
                                    > http://www.castcnc.com/box.html
                                    > The plan is to make a Jos's 4x4 rack and pinion cnc router similar to
                                    > this one:
                                    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rBTJyOaeWY&html5=1
                                    >

                                    --

                                    yvt

                                    Rupert Wenig
                                    Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

                                    email: rwenig2@...

                                    http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
                                  • Rupert
                                    Hello Dennis, CNC was totally new to me too when I first got into it. I chose the JGRO design on the recommendations of a couple of members on our local metal
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Dec 11, 2013
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                                      Hello Dennis,
                                      CNC was totally new to me too when I first got into it. I chose the
                                      JGRO design on the recommendations of a couple of members on our local
                                      metal working group. The JGRO construction is all MDF so it is cheap to
                                      construct but being wood it is only good for machining wood. The
                                      downfall of the MDF is it changes dimensions when the humidity changes.
                                      Otherwise, I am happy with the way it worked.
                                      The electronics is the expensive part. Any cheap desk top computer is
                                      fine. I opted for a Gecko 540 controller which was the most expensive
                                      part but I'm not sorry I did. The stepper motors came from Automation
                                      direct. The size of the stepper motors depends on the size of the
                                      machine you build. The NEMA 23 work nicely on the JGRO design. Nothing
                                      else is needed except wiring if your computer has a 25 pin printer port.
                                      A laptop doesn't put out he same voltages at the printer port so a
                                      smooth stepper is needed between the computer and the controller. There
                                      are other brands and choices of electronics to use too but I'm not
                                      familiar with them.
                                      Then for software, I use Mach3 to run the machine. You know G-code and
                                      cad so I think that is about it.
                                      The total cost for mine was around $1000 in 2008.

                                      Rupert

                                      On 12/11/2013 5:53 AM, Dennis wrote:
                                      > May I ask I'm haven't got into CNC even tho I do know g-code and have
                                      > Bobcad and inventor pro I have yet to turn my lathe or mill into CNC but
                                      > I wanted to make a small CNC table something like 3'x 3' what stepper
                                      > motors and such would be best I'm far from rich like most of us but I do
                                      > have a means of making my own parts and casting alike so where do you
                                      > even start with a CNC table that I could use my router on and also be
                                      > able to take it off and say take out the wood bottom and put a sheet of
                                      > steel plate or rather a steel grid to lay in so it could be used for
                                      > both?? I have a lot of older home use jet printers now I would say that
                                      > the stepper motors would be way to small but Im not sure this is kinda
                                      > new to me...
                                      >
                                      > Dennis

                                      --

                                      yvt

                                      Rupert Wenig
                                      Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

                                      email: rwenig2@...

                                      http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
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