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Re: yellow metal

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  • Lyle
    Or if it says Volkswagen or Lawnboy on the casting....
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 19, 2013
      Or if it says Volkswagen or Lawnboy on the casting....



      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Rupert <rwenig2@...> wrote:
      >
      > Regular household white vinegar works fine too. You don't need
      > distilled vinegar.
      >
      > Rupert
      >
      >
      > On 2/19/2013 11:56 AM, Kerri Duncan wrote:
      > > Carl- simple test for Mg- scuff an area bright with some sandpaper and put a drop of distilled vinegar on it- if it fizzes- its Mg.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- On Tue, 2/19/13, Carl <carl_r2000@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Carl <carl_r2000@...>
      > > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: yellow metal
      > > To: "hobbicast@yahoogroups.com" <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Date: Tuesday, February 19, 2013, 1:20 PM
      > >
      > >
      > >
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      > >
      > > It is real hard to tell magnesium from aluminum. It is a little lighter but most of the scrap buyers think it is aluminum. The turnings catch fire very easy. Baking soda will put the fire out. For anybody melting scrap aluminum it would be a good idea to have a fair amount of baking soda near by just in case some of your scrap was magnesium. The main source would be VW engine and transmission cases but lots of things might be magnesium. Also when it is machined a fast cutter speed will set it on fire. I have done that three times and I am sure glad I had baking soda ready. It burns really hot and bright. I believe they use magnesium rods for welding under water. Carl
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Nelson Collar nel2lar@...>
      > > To: "hobbicast@yahoogroups.com" hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2013 9:02 AM
      > > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: yellow metal
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Lyle
      > > Do not try to melt magnesium,
      > > it has a very low burning temp and once burning there is no way to
      > > put it out except taking its oxygen away. I would not try melting it.
      > >
      > >
      > > Nelson Collar
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Lyle creepinogie@...>
      > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2013 11:42 AM
      > > Subject: [hobbicast] Re: yellow metal
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > If I can't find mag. bronze which is a yellow color, then I use silicon bronze which you can buy at most metal suppliers and add up to 30% zinc to get a yellow color. There is alloy 513 which is a silicon bronze with 15% zinc already added which casts to a yellow brass color but you need to remove the casting patina on it. Adding more zinc will make the casting more easlily machinable as silicon bronze is pretty tough stuff. I buy my zinc as "anodes" used in the construction trade and they come in about 1 lb balls. The price of ingot has really gone up but casting scrap is time consuing as one needs to cut it up, separate it, remove all the soldered sweat joints etc.
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
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      > --
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      > yvt
      >
      > Rupert Wenig
      > Camrose, Alberta, Canada.
      >
      > email: rwenig2@...
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      > http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
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    • Kerri Duncan
      Puprple gold is detrimental to electronics- that is for certain- but there are others that are actually using it to their advantage- true- they are jewelers...
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 21, 2013
        Puprple gold is detrimental to electronics- that is for certain- but there are others that are actually using it to their advantage- true- they are jewelers... but I like the results!
        Check out:
        http://www.meevis.com/jewelry-making-class-faceted-purple-gold.htm
         
        Meevis' initial experiments in the ingots:
        http://www.meevis.com/jewelery-making-class-purple-gold-experiments.htm
         
        And applied to lapidary:
        http://hansmeevis.blogspot.com/2007/09/tourmaline-and-purple-gold-lamination.html
         
        Just thought I would give a different take on the topic as to some it is a problem... and to other fields- its a fashion...
         
        If you guys like the purple gold you will also like his crystal steam engine- Made of CZ:
        http://ganoksin.com/blog/meevis/2012/02/14/the-mini-cz-steam-engine-part-2/
         
        Be safe and enjoy!
        Kerri

        --- On Thu, 2/21/13, postello@... <postello@...> wrote:


        From: postello@... <postello@...>
        Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: yellow metal
        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, February 21, 2013, 8:56 PM



         





         I'm still looking for the article, I think it was in Nature.  Purple plague is an aluminum-gold intermetallic, a problem in some integrated circuits.

        Without deviation from the norm, 'progress' is not possible. _ Frank Vincent Zappa Quoting Jeshua Lacock jeshua@...>:

        >
        > On Feb 17, 2013, at 10:50 PM, tmoranwms wrote:
        >
        >> Of these, copper obviously is the "pinkest"; gold is, well, golden;
        >> and cesium is only a tinge yellowish (it's also explosive around
        >> water..).
        >>
        >> As far as I know, alloys ONLY have a "plasma frequency" higher
        >> (i.e., more UV, less red) than the "reddest" element used. So,
        >> copper-gold alloys are still golden, but copper-silver alloys
        >> quickly turn from coppery to brassy to silvery, just as aluminum
        >> bronzes, and zinc brasses (past 40% zinc being "white" I believe).
        >>
        >> There are some oddball alloys, like "purple gold", an intermetallic
        >> with aluminum (brittle, of course). I haven't been able to find
        >> anything about this mixture, or why it's given the name it is. It
        >> could be merely a surface layer, much as anodized titanium takes on
        >> colors. I don't know. I also don't know if any other alloys, not
        >> involving copper, gold or cesium, are any other color than silvery,
        >> but I haven't heard of any.
        >
        > Thanks for the interesting post Tim.
        >
        > This is likely no help to the OP because ferrotitanum has a higher
        > melting temperature, but I recall the ferrotitanum that I have played
        > with (via aluminothermic reaction) had a light golden color.
        >
        > Perhaps it was also just the surface?
        >
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > Jeshua Lacock
        > Founder/Engineer
        > 3DTOPO Incorporated
        > http://3DTOPO.com>
        > Phone: 208.462.4171
        >
        >

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