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Re: [hobbicast] yellow metal

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  • Rupert
    hello Howard, Wish I could help you as the info is interesting to me too. I did a Google search on yellow metal. The closest I found was Muntz metal which is
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 18, 2013
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      hello Howard,
      Wish I could help you as the info is interesting to me too. I did a
      Google search on yellow metal. The closest I found was "Muntz metal"
      which is about 60% copper and 40% zinc. Your zamak may work to get a
      close proximity to that. Muntz metal melts at around 1700F so that isn't
      that much hotter than some aluminum alloys. But, Muntz metal is yellow,
      not red. The percentage of aluminum in zamak will probably make the
      yellow color a bit lighter.

      Rupert

      On 2/17/2013 7:56 PM, StoneTool wrote:
      > Does anybody know of any low temp castable "yellow metals", or of
      > colorants that can be used to give a coppery color to something like
      > aluminum or zamak (other than anodizing). I'm interested in achieving
      > a deep coppery color like red brass without dealing with the high melt
      > temp.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Howard
      >
      >
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    • Kerri Duncan
      Puprple gold is detrimental to electronics- that is for certain- but there are others that are actually using it to their advantage- true- they are jewelers...
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 21, 2013
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        Puprple gold is detrimental to electronics- that is for certain- but there are others that are actually using it to their advantage- true- they are jewelers... but I like the results!
        Check out:
        http://www.meevis.com/jewelry-making-class-faceted-purple-gold.htm
         
        Meevis' initial experiments in the ingots:
        http://www.meevis.com/jewelery-making-class-purple-gold-experiments.htm
         
        And applied to lapidary:
        http://hansmeevis.blogspot.com/2007/09/tourmaline-and-purple-gold-lamination.html
         
        Just thought I would give a different take on the topic as to some it is a problem... and to other fields- its a fashion...
         
        If you guys like the purple gold you will also like his crystal steam engine- Made of CZ:
        http://ganoksin.com/blog/meevis/2012/02/14/the-mini-cz-steam-engine-part-2/
         
        Be safe and enjoy!
        Kerri

        --- On Thu, 2/21/13, postello@... <postello@...> wrote:


        From: postello@... <postello@...>
        Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: yellow metal
        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, February 21, 2013, 8:56 PM



         





         I'm still looking for the article, I think it was in Nature.  Purple plague is an aluminum-gold intermetallic, a problem in some integrated circuits.

        Without deviation from the norm, 'progress' is not possible. _ Frank Vincent Zappa Quoting Jeshua Lacock jeshua@...>:

        >
        > On Feb 17, 2013, at 10:50 PM, tmoranwms wrote:
        >
        >> Of these, copper obviously is the "pinkest"; gold is, well, golden;
        >> and cesium is only a tinge yellowish (it's also explosive around
        >> water..).
        >>
        >> As far as I know, alloys ONLY have a "plasma frequency" higher
        >> (i.e., more UV, less red) than the "reddest" element used. So,
        >> copper-gold alloys are still golden, but copper-silver alloys
        >> quickly turn from coppery to brassy to silvery, just as aluminum
        >> bronzes, and zinc brasses (past 40% zinc being "white" I believe).
        >>
        >> There are some oddball alloys, like "purple gold", an intermetallic
        >> with aluminum (brittle, of course). I haven't been able to find
        >> anything about this mixture, or why it's given the name it is. It
        >> could be merely a surface layer, much as anodized titanium takes on
        >> colors. I don't know. I also don't know if any other alloys, not
        >> involving copper, gold or cesium, are any other color than silvery,
        >> but I haven't heard of any.
        >
        > Thanks for the interesting post Tim.
        >
        > This is likely no help to the OP because ferrotitanum has a higher
        > melting temperature, but I recall the ferrotitanum that I have played
        > with (via aluminothermic reaction) had a light golden color.
        >
        > Perhaps it was also just the surface?
        >
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > Jeshua Lacock
        > Founder/Engineer
        > 3DTOPO Incorporated
        > http://3DTOPO.com>
        > Phone: 208.462.4171
        >
        >

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