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Silicon carbide or ceramic filters

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  • Doug - SubmarineBoat.com
    Greetings Does anyone know of a source for small quantities of ceramic filters? Like these:
    Message 1 of 28 , Feb 15, 2012
      Greetings

      Does anyone know of a source for small quantities of ceramic filters?

      Like these: http://i01.i.aliimg.com/photo/v0/452811057/factory_of_ceramic_foam_filter_for_casting.jpg

      Thanks
      Doug
      SVSeeker.com
    • Jeshua Lacock
      ... I don t, but depending on what you are pouring, steel wool can work great. Cheap and readily available. Best, Jeshua Lacock Founder/Engineer 3DTOPO
      Message 2 of 28 , Feb 15, 2012
        On Feb 15, 2012, at 8:31 PM, Doug - SubmarineBoat.com wrote:

        > Does anyone know of a source for small quantities of ceramic filters?

        I don't, but depending on what you are pouring, steel wool can work great.

        Cheap and readily available.


        Best,

        Jeshua Lacock
        Founder/Engineer
        3DTOPO Incorporated
        <http://3DTOPO.com>
        Phone: 208.462.4171
      • Jeshua Lacock
        ... Another idea is volcanic/lava rock. They are quite porous and sell big bags at Home Depot. Not sure if the pores are large enough, but I have seen quite
        Message 3 of 28 , Feb 15, 2012
          On Feb 15, 2012, at 8:31 PM, Doug - SubmarineBoat.com wrote:

          > Does anyone know of a source for small quantities of ceramic filters?

          Another idea is volcanic/lava rock. They are quite porous and sell big bags at Home Depot.

          Not sure if the pores are large enough, but I have seen quite large pores in volcanic rock before.


          Best,

          Jeshua Lacock
          Founder/Engineer
          3DTOPO Incorporated
          <http://3DTOPO.com>
          Phone: 208.462.4171
        • Rupert
          Hello Doug, Check this site out . Might be what your looking for. I ve used the mica filters with good success. Rupert
          Message 4 of 28 , Feb 15, 2012
            Hello Doug,
            Check this site out <http://www.mgstevens.com/filters.html>. Might be
            what your looking for. I've used the mica filters with good success.

            Rupert

            On 2/15/2012 8:31 PM, Doug - SubmarineBoat.com wrote:
            > Greetings
            >
            > Does anyone know of a source for small quantities of ceramic filters?
            >
            > Like these: http://i01.i.aliimg.com/photo/v0/452811057/factory_of_ceramic_foam_filter_for_casting.jpg
            >
            > Thanks
            > Doug
            > SVSeeker.com
            >
            >
            >
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          • postello@msu.edu
            Sometimes they are available at www.sciplus.org, but I haven t seen them recently. Scott Walker; Wisconsin; Madison; Maddow the collective bargaining situation
            Message 5 of 28 , Feb 16, 2012
              Sometimes they are available at www.sciplus.org, but I haven't seen
              them recently.
              Scott Walker; Wisconsin; Madison; Maddow the collective bargaining
              situation in Wisconsin


              Quoting "Doug - SubmarineBoat.com" <svseeker@...>:

              > Greetings
              >
              > Does anyone know of a source for small quantities of ceramic filters?
              >
              > Like these:
              > http://i01.i.aliimg.com/photo/v0/452811057/factory_of_ceramic_foam_filter_for_casting.jpg
              >
              > Thanks
              > Doug
              > SVSeeker.com
              >
              >
            • Scott Trostel
              What does this mean? ________________________________ From: postello@msu.edu Scott Walker; Wisconsin; Madison; Maddow the collective
              Message 6 of 28 , Feb 16, 2012
                What does this mean?



                ________________________________
                From: "postello@..." <postello@...>


                Scott Walker; Wisconsin; Madison; Maddow the collective bargaining
                situation in Wisconsin

                Scott Trostel


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lyle
                OK, I ll bite. What metal does steel wool work great for when pouring thruogh? Have you ever done it? LL
                Message 7 of 28 , Feb 17, 2012
                  OK, I'll bite. What metal does steel wool work great for when pouring thruogh? Have you ever done it?
                  LL


                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > On Feb 15, 2012, at 8:31 PM, Doug - SubmarineBoat.com wrote:
                  >
                  > > Does anyone know of a source for small quantities of ceramic filters?
                  >
                  > I don't, but depending on what you are pouring, steel wool can work great.
                  >
                  > Cheap and readily available.
                  >
                  >
                  > Best,
                  >
                  > Jeshua Lacock
                  > Founder/Engineer
                  > 3DTOPO Incorporated
                  > <http://3DTOPO.com>
                  > Phone: 208.462.4171
                  >
                • Jeshua Lacock
                  ... I have used it for both aluminum and cast iron. I didn t specify this but I have only used the course type. Note they also make copper wool too if you were
                  Message 8 of 28 , Feb 17, 2012
                    On Feb 17, 2012, at 9:33 AM, Lyle wrote:

                    > OK, I'll bite. What metal does steel wool work great for when pouring thruogh? Have you ever done it?

                    I have used it for both aluminum and cast iron. I didn't specify this but I have only used the course type.

                    Note they also make copper wool too if you were concerned with chemistry with aluminum, but I haven't noticed any issues. I have used a steel crucible more times than I can count, so I don't see how it be any worse to pour aluminum through steel wool.


                    Best,

                    Jeshua Lacock
                    Founder/Engineer
                    3DTOPO Incorporated
                    <http://3DTOPO.com>
                    Phone: 208.462.4171
                  • Jeshua Lacock
                    ... One correction, I was thinking it was called steel wool, but what I meant was steel scouring pads . They are also available in copper and aluminum. Best,
                    Message 9 of 28 , Feb 17, 2012
                      On Feb 17, 2012, at 10:11 AM, Jeshua Lacock wrote:

                      >
                      > On Feb 17, 2012, at 9:33 AM, Lyle wrote:
                      >
                      > > OK, I'll bite. What metal does steel wool work great for when pouring thruogh? Have you ever done it?

                      One correction, I was thinking it was called steel wool, but what I meant was "steel scouring pads". They are also available in copper and aluminum.


                      Best,

                      Jeshua Lacock
                      Founder/Engineer
                      3DTOPO Incorporated
                      <http://3DTOPO.com>
                      Phone: 208.462.4171
                    • Pierre Coueffin
                      That makes sense... I was trying to figure out how you keep the steel wool from bursting into flames... I use the stuff for tinder when camping sometimes. I
                      Message 10 of 28 , Feb 17, 2012
                        That makes sense... I was trying to figure out how you keep the steel
                        wool from bursting into flames... I use the stuff for tinder when
                        camping sometimes. I guess the scouring pads are about the
                        consistancy of swarf from the lathe?

                        On 2/17/12, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                        > One correction, I was thinking it was called steel wool, but what I meant
                        > was "steel scouring pads". They are also available in copper and aluminum.
                      • Jeshua Lacock
                        ... Correct. Though, I don t think aluminum would be nearly hot enough to ignite steel wool. I guess it would need to be about 3,000 degrees first. Best,
                        Message 11 of 28 , Feb 17, 2012
                          On Feb 17, 2012, at 2:51 PM, Pierre Coueffin wrote:

                          > That makes sense... I was trying to figure out how you keep the steel
                          > wool from bursting into flames... I use the stuff for tinder when
                          > camping sometimes. I guess the scouring pads are about the
                          > consistancy of swarf from the lathe?

                          Correct.

                          Though, I don't think aluminum would be nearly hot enough to ignite steel wool. I guess it would need to be about 3,000 degrees first.


                          Best,

                          Jeshua Lacock
                          Founder/Engineer
                          3DTOPO Incorporated
                          <http://3DTOPO.com>
                          Phone: 208.462.4171
                        • stan campbell
                          you can light fine steel wool with a match or cigarette lighter, its, neat, a fast oxidation, rust! not much left.   STAN www.toolfools.com/forum [Non-text
                          Message 12 of 28 , Feb 18, 2012
                            you can light fine steel wool with a match or cigarette lighter, its, neat, a fast oxidation, rust! not much left.

                             
                            STAN
                            www.toolfools.com/forum


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Lyle
                            And brass or bronze will dissolve it almost instantaneously. I d really like some photos. LL
                            Message 13 of 28 , Feb 18, 2012
                              And brass or bronze will dissolve it almost instantaneously.
                              I'd really like some photos.
                              LL

                              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, stan campbell <stan2778@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > you can light fine steel wool with a match or cigarette lighter, its, neat, a fast oxidation, rust! not much left.
                              >
                              >  
                              > STAN
                              > www.toolfools.com/forum
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • Jeshua Lacock
                              ... Yup, or a touch of a 9-volt battery. Best, Jeshua Lacock Founder/Engineer 3DTOPO Incorporated Phone: 208.462.4171
                              Message 14 of 28 , Feb 18, 2012
                                On Feb 18, 2012, at 5:36 AM, stan campbell wrote:

                                > you can light fine steel wool with a match or cigarette lighter, its, neat, a fast oxidation, rust! not much left.

                                Yup, or a touch of a 9-volt battery.


                                Best,

                                Jeshua Lacock
                                Founder/Engineer
                                3DTOPO Incorporated
                                <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                Phone: 208.462.4171
                              • Jeshua Lacock
                                ... See photos of what? 1. I corrected myself, I meant scouring pads *not* fine steel wool. 2. I have never used a steel scouring pad or steel wool with brass
                                Message 15 of 28 , Feb 18, 2012
                                  On Feb 18, 2012, at 9:21 AM, Lyle wrote:

                                  > And brass or bronze will dissolve it almost instantaneously.
                                  > I'd really like some photos.

                                  See photos of what?

                                  1. I corrected myself, I meant scouring pads *not* fine steel wool.

                                  2. I have never used a steel scouring pad or steel wool with brass or bronze.

                                  3. Scouring pads and metal wool are available in many metals: stainless steel, copper, bronze, aluminum, etc. There is a good chance that a copper scouring pad would be fine with brass or bronze. I have used aluminum cans to raise my sprue sometimes, and even when I pour aluminum they are mostly intact after the pour. I also haven't done it, but I would guess stainless steel scouring pads would be fine for brass or bronze.

                                  So if you want a photo of it, I would suggest trying it yourself and take a photo since I have never done it.


                                  Best,

                                  Jeshua Lacock
                                  Founder/Engineer
                                  3DTOPO Incorporated
                                  <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                  Phone: 208.462.4171
                                • postello@msu.edu
                                  It might dissolve the fine steel wool. Dan P. Scott Walker; Wisconsin; Madison; Maddow the collective bargaining situation in Wisconsin
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Feb 18, 2012
                                    It might dissolve the fine steel wool. Dan P.
                                    Scott Walker; Wisconsin; Madison; Maddow the collective bargaining
                                    situation in Wisconsin


                                    Quoting Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...>:

                                    >
                                    > On Feb 17, 2012, at 2:51 PM, Pierre Coueffin wrote:
                                    >
                                    >> That makes sense... I was trying to figure out how you keep the steel
                                    >> wool from bursting into flames... I use the stuff for tinder when
                                    >> camping sometimes. I guess the scouring pads are about the
                                    >> consistancy of swarf from the lathe?
                                    >
                                    > Correct.
                                    >
                                    > Though, I don't think aluminum would be nearly hot enough to ignite
                                    > steel wool. I guess it would need to be about 3,000 degrees first.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Best,
                                    >
                                    > Jeshua Lacock
                                    > Founder/Engineer
                                    > 3DTOPO Incorporated
                                    > <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                    > Phone: 208.462.4171
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Jeshua Lacock
                                    ... It certainly might. Again, I never meant to say steel wool, I meant to say steel scouring pads. They are very similar and was easily mislabeled. Best,
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Feb 18, 2012
                                      On Feb 18, 2012, at 1:58 PM, postello@... wrote:

                                      > It might dissolve the fine steel wool. Dan P.

                                      It certainly might.

                                      Again, I never meant to say steel wool, I meant to say steel scouring pads. They are very similar and was easily mislabeled.


                                      Best,

                                      Jeshua Lacock
                                      Founder/Engineer
                                      3DTOPO Incorporated
                                      <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                      Phone: 208.462.4171
                                    • Lyle
                                      Ok, that s what I figured.
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Feb 20, 2012
                                        Ok, that's what I figured.


                                        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > On Feb 18, 2012, at 9:21 AM, Lyle wrote:
                                        >
                                        > > And brass or bronze will dissolve it almost instantaneously.
                                        > > I'd really like some photos.
                                        >
                                        > See photos of what?
                                        >
                                        > 1. I corrected myself, I meant scouring pads *not* fine steel wool.
                                        >
                                        > 2. I have never used a steel scouring pad or steel wool with brass or bronze.
                                        >
                                        > 3. Scouring pads and metal wool are available in many metals: stainless steel, copper, bronze, aluminum, etc. There is a good chance that a copper scouring pad would be fine with brass or bronze. I have used aluminum cans to raise my sprue sometimes, and even when I pour aluminum they are mostly intact after the pour. I also haven't done it, but I would guess stainless steel scouring pads would be fine for brass or bronze.
                                        >
                                        > So if you want a photo of it, I would suggest trying it yourself and take a photo since I have never done it.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Best,
                                        >
                                        > Jeshua Lacock
                                        > Founder/Engineer
                                        > 3DTOPO Incorporated
                                        > <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                        > Phone: 208.462.4171
                                        >
                                      • Jeshua Lacock
                                        ... What did you figure? You are talking about something that I used the wrong word for what I meant - after I already corrected myself on the issue. But you
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Feb 20, 2012
                                          On Feb 18, 2012, at 9:21 AM, Lyle wrote:

                                          > Ok, that's what I figured.

                                          What did you figure? You are talking about something that I used the wrong word for what I meant - after I already corrected myself on the issue. But you are still acting like I didn't correct myself.

                                          Steel scouring pads work great for a filter with aluminum and iron in my experience. That is all I was intending to say on the subject.

                                          Take my tip or leave it, but no need to make a big issue from the correction that I made. Sorry I am only human.


                                          Best,

                                          Jeshua Lacock
                                          Founder/Engineer
                                          3DTOPO Incorporated
                                          <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                          Phone: 208.462.4171
                                        • Thomas K
                                          The finer the steel wool is the faster oxidation takes place. You can light steel wool with a match and that barely burns hot enough to melt solder. On the
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Mar 4, 2012
                                            The finer the steel wool is the faster oxidation takes place. You can light steel wool with a match and that barely burns hot enough to melt solder. On the other hand any steel with any heft to it at all can't be set to a self-sustaining fire with any amount of heat, at least not in a 21 percent oxygen atmosphere.

                                            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > On Feb 17, 2012, at 2:51 PM, Pierre Coueffin wrote:
                                            >
                                            > > That makes sense... I was trying to figure out how you keep the steel
                                            > > wool from bursting into flames... I use the stuff for tinder when
                                            > > camping sometimes. I guess the scouring pads are about the
                                            > > consistancy of swarf from the lathe?
                                            >
                                            > Correct.
                                            >
                                            > Though, I don't think aluminum would be nearly hot enough to ignite steel wool. I guess it would need to be about 3,000 degrees first.
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Best,
                                            >
                                            > Jeshua Lacock
                                            > Founder/Engineer
                                            > 3DTOPO Incorporated
                                            > <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                            > Phone: 208.462.4171
                                            >
                                          • Bob
                                            I suspect that a match flame is closer to 1100-1500 fahrenheit: which is reachable by molten aluminum. but the liguid aluminum will also do a pretty good job
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Mar 6, 2012
                                              I suspect that a match flame is closer to 1100-1500 fahrenheit: which is reachable by molten aluminum. but the liguid aluminum will also do a pretty good job of excluding oxygen, except at the boundaries.

                                              Bob R

                                              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas K" <slowswimmer1@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > The finer the steel wool is the faster oxidation takes place. You can light steel wool with a match and that barely burns hot enough to melt solder. On the other hand any steel with any heft to it at all can't be set to a self-sustaining fire with any amount of heat, at least not in a 21 percent oxygen atmosphere.
                                              >
                                            • Jeshua Lacock
                                              ... A lighter/match flame is about 3000F. This is evident by the color of the gas which is white/bright yellow. If it was 1100F it would be a very dull red if
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Mar 6, 2012
                                                On Mar 6, 2012, at 11:53 AM, Bob wrote:

                                                > I suspect that a match flame is closer to 1100-1500 fahrenheit: which is reachable by molten aluminum. but the liguid aluminum will also do a pretty good job of excluding oxygen, except at the boundaries.

                                                A lighter/match flame is about 3000F.

                                                This is evident by the color of the gas which is white/bright yellow. If it was 1100F it would be a very dull red if you could even see it.


                                                Best,

                                                Jeshua Lacock
                                                Founder/Engineer
                                                3DTOPO Incorporated
                                                <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                                Phone: 208.462.4171
                                              • Lyle
                                                A match (or candle) isn t close to 3000F. A match flame is usually lower than a candle which can reach about $1500 max. A match won t even come close. It s not
                                                Message 23 of 28 , Mar 6, 2012
                                                  A match (or candle) isn't close to 3000F.
                                                  A match flame is usually lower than a candle which can reach about $1500 max. A match won't even come close. It's not as simple as just looking at the color. It depends upon the fuel source, laminar or turbulent, if the flame is losing heat (adiabatic?)how much oxidizer being used etc.

                                                  LL



                                                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > On Mar 6, 2012, at 11:53 AM, Bob wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > > I suspect that a match flame is closer to 1100-1500 fahrenheit: which is reachable by molten aluminum. but the liguid aluminum will also do a pretty good job of excluding oxygen, except at the boundaries.
                                                  >
                                                  > A lighter/match flame is about 3000F.
                                                  >
                                                  > This is evident by the color of the gas which is white/bright yellow. If it was 1100F it would be a very dull red if you could even see it.
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > Best,
                                                  >
                                                  > Jeshua Lacock
                                                  > Founder/Engineer
                                                  > 3DTOPO Incorporated
                                                  > <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                                  > Phone: 208.462.4171
                                                  >
                                                • Jeshua Lacock
                                                  ... Actually a candle is between 1200 F and 3500 F according to this: http://www.derose.net/steve/resources/engtables/flametemp.html Either way, I stand
                                                  Message 24 of 28 , Mar 6, 2012
                                                    On Mar 6, 2012, at 8:55 PM, Lyle wrote:

                                                    > A match (or candle) isn't close to 3000F.
                                                    > A match flame is usually lower than a candle which can reach about $1500 max. A match won't even come close. It's not as simple as just looking at the color. It depends upon the fuel source, laminar or turbulent, if the flame is losing heat (adiabatic?)how much oxidizer being used etc.

                                                    Actually a candle is between 1200 F and 3500 F according to this:

                                                    http://www.derose.net/steve/resources/engtables/flametemp.html


                                                    Either way, I stand corrected - it states that a match is only 1112 F and 1472 F. Interesting.


                                                    Best,

                                                    Jeshua Lacock
                                                    Founder/Engineer
                                                    3DTOPO Incorporated
                                                    <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                                    Phone: 208.462.4171
                                                  • Lyle
                                                    I think you better work on your C to F conversion. Even at it s hottest, a candle isn t near 3500F as you state. But using your link, we see that one cannot go
                                                    Message 25 of 28 , Mar 6, 2012
                                                      I think you better work on your C to F conversion. Even at it's hottest, a candle isn't near 3500F as you state.

                                                      But using your link, we see that one cannot go by color alone...


                                                      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > On Mar 6, 2012, at 8:55 PM, Lyle wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      > > A match (or candle) isn't close to 3000F.
                                                      > > A match flame is usually lower than a candle which can reach about $1500 max. A match won't even come close. It's not as simple as just looking at the color. It depends upon the fuel source, laminar or turbulent, if the flame is losing heat (adiabatic?)how much oxidizer being used etc.
                                                      >
                                                      > Actually a candle is between 1200 F and 3500 F according to this:
                                                      >
                                                      > http://www.derose.net/steve/resources/engtables/flametemp.html
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > Either way, I stand corrected - it states that a match is only 1112 F and 1472 F. Interesting.
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > Best,
                                                      >
                                                      > Jeshua Lacock
                                                      > Founder/Engineer
                                                      > 3DTOPO Incorporated
                                                      > <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                                      > Phone: 208.462.4171
                                                      >
                                                    • Jeshua Lacock
                                                      ... Ooops - typo. I meant 2500F not 3500F. ... Which is indeed interesting, thank you. Best, Jeshua Lacock Founder/Engineer 3DTOPO Incorporated
                                                      Message 26 of 28 , Mar 6, 2012
                                                        On Mar 6, 2012, at 9:19 PM, Lyle wrote:

                                                        > I think you better work on your C to F conversion. Even at it's hottest, a candle isn't near 3500F as you state.

                                                        Ooops - typo. I meant 2500F not 3500F.

                                                        > But using your link, we see that one cannot go by color alone...

                                                        Which is indeed interesting, thank you.


                                                        Best,

                                                        Jeshua Lacock
                                                        Founder/Engineer
                                                        3DTOPO Incorporated
                                                        <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                                        Phone: 208.462.4171
                                                      • postello@msu.edu
                                                         most matches use a perchlorate oxidiser ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                        Message 27 of 28 , Mar 8, 2012
                                                           most matches use a perchlorate oxidiser

                                                          Scott Walker; Wisconsin; Madison; Maddow the collective bargaining situation in Wisconsin Quoting Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...>:

                                                          >
                                                          > On Mar 6, 2012, at 8:55 PM, Lyle wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          >> A match (or candle) isn't close to 3000F.
                                                          >> A match flame is usually lower than a candle which can reach about
                                                          >> $1500 max. A match won't even come close. It's not as simple as just
                                                          >> looking at the color. It depends upon the fuel source, laminar or
                                                          >> turbulent, if the flame is losing heat (adiabatic?)how much oxidizer
                                                          >> being used etc.
                                                          >
                                                          > Actually a candle is between 1200 F and 3500 F according to this:
                                                          >
                                                          > http://www.derose.net/steve/resources/engtables/flametemp.html
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > Either way, I stand corrected -  it states that a match is only 1112
                                                          > F and 1472 F. Interesting.
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > Best,
                                                          >
                                                          > Jeshua Lacock
                                                          > Founder/Engineer
                                                          > 3DTOPO Incorporated
                                                          > <http://3DTOPO.com>
                                                          > Phone: 208.462.4171
                                                          >
                                                          >

                                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                        • Rowland Smuck
                                                          I recently bought a box of Farmer Matches thinking they would be good to light my shop stove, Biggg suprise I guess the govt is now controling them also, they
                                                          Message 28 of 28 , Mar 8, 2012
                                                            I recently bought a box of Farmer Matches thinking they would be good to light my shop stove, Biggg suprise I guess the govt is now controling them also, they are so bad I can't believe it, the heads sluff off dangerously you have to scratch them on the box and even that doesn't work well, I checked other stores and everyone has the same sh;;ty ones
                                                            Rowland

                                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                                            From: postello@...
                                                            To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                                                            Sent: Thursday, March 8, 2012 8:37:11 AM
                                                            Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: Silicon carbide or ceramic filters








                                                            most matches use a perchlorate oxidiser

                                                            Scott Walker; Wisconsin; Madison; Maddow the collective bargaining situation in Wisconsin Quoting Jeshua Lacock < jeshua@... >:

                                                            >
                                                            > On Mar 6, 2012, at 8:55 PM, Lyle wrote:
                                                            >
                                                            >> A match (or candle) isn't close to 3000F.
                                                            >> A match flame is usually lower than a candle which can reach about
                                                            >> $1500 max. A match won't even come close. It's not as simple as just
                                                            >> looking at the color. It depends upon the fuel source, laminar or
                                                            >> turbulent, if the flame is losing heat (adiabatic?)how much oxidizer
                                                            >> being used etc.
                                                            >
                                                            > Actually a candle is between 1200 F and 3500 F according to this:
                                                            >
                                                            > http://www.derose.net/steve/resources/engtables/flametemp.html
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            > Either way, I stand corrected - it states that a match is only 1112
                                                            > F and 1472 F. Interesting.
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            > Best,
                                                            >
                                                            > Jeshua Lacock
                                                            > Founder/Engineer
                                                            > 3DTOPO Incorporated
                                                            > < http://3DTOPO.com >
                                                            > Phone: 208.462.4171
                                                            >
                                                            >

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