Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Repairing green sand mold

Expand Messages
  • ferrman1001
    Do any of you repair a green sand mold if it is broken? Most times I do not but having seen this video I might change my mind. http://youtu.be/19g5-2tzz18
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 9 10:12 PM
      Do any of you repair a green sand mold if it is broken? Most times I do not but having seen this video I might change my mind. http://youtu.be/19g5-2tzz18 While I am on the subject I made a video of how I re enforced a green sand core so it will not break when lifting the pattern out. http://youtu.be/V13VhShM78A Ernie
    • Lyle
      Hey, I ve done that using the same type of threaded rod. It s called a gagger. Sometimes I will fix molds, usually just by reramming one of the halves.
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 10 1:52 PM
        Hey, I've done that using the same type of threaded rod. It's called a gagger. Sometimes I will fix molds, usually just by reramming one of the halves.

        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "ferrman1001" <ferrman1001@...> wrote:
        >
        > Do any of you repair a green sand mold if it is broken? Most times I do not but having seen this video I might change my mind. http://youtu.be/19g5-2tzz18 While I am on the subject I made a video of how I re enforced a green sand core so it will not break when lifting the pattern out. http://youtu.be/V13VhShM78A Ernie
        >
      • Jim Rogers
        I m using petrobond, but at the times where small pieces break off during demolding, I use a few drops of super glue, to stick that piece back in place - not
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 10 2:46 PM
          I'm using petrobond, but at the times where small pieces break off
          during demolding, I use a few drops of super glue, to stick that piece
          back in place - not very orthodox, but it does the job!

          Jim

          On 1/10/2012 1:52 PM, Lyle wrote:
          > Hey, I've done that using the same type of threaded rod. It's called a gagger. Sometimes I will fix molds, usually just by reramming one of the halves.
          >
          > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "ferrman1001"<ferrman1001@...> wrote:
          >> Do any of you repair a green sand mold if it is broken? Most times I do not but having seen this video I might change my mind. http://youtu.be/19g5-2tzz18 While I am on the subject I made a video of how I re enforced a green sand core so it will not break when lifting the pattern out. http://youtu.be/V13VhShM78A Ernie
          >>
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lyle
          I ve done that with coresand but not petrobond.
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 10 2:52 PM
            I've done that with coresand but not petrobond.


            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rogers <jr@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm using petrobond, but at the times where small pieces break off
            > during demolding, I use a few drops of super glue, to stick that piece
            > back in place - not very orthodox, but it does the job!
            >
            > Jim
            >
            > On 1/10/2012 1:52 PM, Lyle wrote:
            > > Hey, I've done that using the same type of threaded rod. It's called a gagger. Sometimes I will fix molds, usually just by reramming one of the halves.
            > >
            > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "ferrman1001"<ferrman1001@> wrote:
            > >> Do any of you repair a green sand mold if it is broken? Most times I do not but having seen this video I might change my mind. http://youtu.be/19g5-2tzz18 While I am on the subject I made a video of how I re enforced a green sand core so it will not break when lifting the pattern out. http://youtu.be/V13VhShM78A Ernie
            > >>
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Jim Rogers
            not big places, but it sure beats re-ramming a new mold! ... -- [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 10 2:54 PM
              not big places, but it sure beats re-ramming a new mold!

              On 1/10/2012 2:52 PM, Lyle wrote:
              > I've done that with coresand but not petrobond.
              >
              >
              > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rogers<jr@...> wrote:
              >> I'm using petrobond, but at the times where small pieces break off
              >> during demolding, I use a few drops of super glue, to stick that piece
              >> back in place - not very orthodox, but it does the job!
              >>
              >> Jim
              >>

              --


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lyle
              How do you keep it from crumbling? Anyone here ever add iron oxide to their petrobond?
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 11 3:52 PM
                How do you keep it from crumbling? Anyone here ever add iron oxide to their petrobond?


                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rogers <jr@...> wrote:
                >
                > not big places, but it sure beats re-ramming a new mold!
                >
                > On 1/10/2012 2:52 PM, Lyle wrote:
                > > I've done that with coresand but not petrobond.
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rogers<jr@> wrote:
                > >> I'm using petrobond, but at the times where small pieces break off
                > >> during demolding, I use a few drops of super glue, to stick that piece
                > >> back in place - not very orthodox, but it does the job!
                > >>
                > >> Jim
                > >>
                >
                > --
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.