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Re: [hobbicast] Re: Analysing metal

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  • Jeshua Lacock
    ... PopSci shows how to build a spectrometer from a cereal box and a CD.
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 20, 2011
      On Dec 20, 2011, at 10:44 AM, Evan Daniel wrote:

      > How much should I expect this service to cost?

      PopSci shows how to build a spectrometer from a cereal box and a CD.

      http://www.popsci.com/diy/article/2008-12/popscicom-5-minute-project-video-cereal-box-spectrometer

      I haven't used it, so can't comment on the quality of the emission lines. But looks like with a bit more work you can turn a prism into a spectrograph with the addition of a grating (which is really just a slit):

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectrometer

      I would hook it up a cheap digital camera.

      Then you just need to look at a spark with it. Maybe a grinding wheel on the metal? Analyze something known first - like known cast iron, then compare.

      Remember, this is 19th century technology, so it is quite achievable at home with modest effort.


      Cheers,

      Jeshua Lacock
      Founder/Engineer
      3DTOPO Incorporated
      <http://3DTOPO.com>
      Phone: 208.462.4171
    • ferrman1001
      Thank you for all the answers. I will have to look into who does this in my local area. I was thinking of using a strong acid to dissolve the iron and weigh
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 20, 2011
        Thank you for all the answers. I will have to look into who does this in my local area. I was thinking of using a strong acid to dissolve the iron and weigh what's left over but getting someone to do a proper test will give a more valid result.

        Ernie
      • Nick Andrews
        There was a similar project I read recently. Maybe in MAKE magazine? Nick A ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 20, 2011
          There was a similar project I read recently. Maybe in MAKE magazine?

          Nick A
          On Dec 20, 2011 10:45 AM, "Jeshua Lacock" <jeshua@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          >
          > On Dec 20, 2011, at 10:44 AM, Evan Daniel wrote:
          >
          > > How much should I expect this service to cost?
          >
          > PopSci shows how to build a spectrometer from a cereal box and a CD.
          >
          >
          > http://www.popsci.com/diy/article/2008-12/popscicom-5-minute-project-video-cereal-box-spectrometer
          >
          > I haven't used it, so can't comment on the quality of the emission lines.
          > But looks like with a bit more work you can turn a prism into a
          > spectrograph with the addition of a grating (which is really just a slit):
          >
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectrometer
          >
          > I would hook it up a cheap digital camera.
          >
          > Then you just need to look at a spark with it. Maybe a grinding wheel on
          > the metal? Analyze something known first - like known cast iron, then
          > compare.
          >
          > Remember, this is 19th century technology, so it is quite achievable at
          > home with modest effort.
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          > Jeshua Lacock
          > Founder/Engineer
          > 3DTOPO Incorporated
          > <http://3DTOPO.com>
          > Phone: 208.462.4171
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Carl
          http://home.nethere.net/rely/price.html#arc     Reed Laboratories in Carlsbad Ca. will do a 56 element analysis for $35. This is for an ore sample. You
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 21, 2011
            http://home.nethere.net/rely/price.html#arc%c2%a0    Reed Laboratories in Carlsbad Ca. will do a 56 element analysis for $35. This is for an ore sample. You would have to contact them to see if they can analyse a solid metal piece. Carl 



            ________________________________
            From: ferrman1001 <ferrman1001@...>
            To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 9:46 PM
            Subject: [hobbicast] Re: Analysing metal


             
            Thank you for all the answers. I will have to look into who does this in my local area. I was thinking of using a strong acid to dissolve the iron and weigh what's left over but getting someone to do a proper test will give a more valid result.

            Ernie




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Stone Tool
            That s an amazing figure.... Considering the cost of the equipment and of labor, they must be doing a tremendous volume to make it work............. From the
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 21, 2011
              That's an amazing figure.... Considering the cost of the equipment and
              of labor, they must be doing a tremendous volume to make it
              work............. From the unpackaging to the preparation to testing,
              generating the results and mailing out the results, book keeping,
              etc... There has to be considerable time involved in each test. I
              paid as I recollect, nearly $250 to have a sample (steel alloy) analyzed
              years ago (Seattle) simply to be able to do a proper weld repair on a
              critical component.... thankfully the supplier of the rod I used for the
              repair supplied the process engineering free of charge along with
              recommending the proper rod. The test made up a large percentage of the
              total cost of the repair which included the machining, heat treating,
              welding, etc.


              Howard


              On 12/21/2011 01:59 AM, Carl wrote:
              > http://home.nethere.net/rely/price.html#arc Reed Laboratories in Carlsbad Ca. will do a 56 element analysis for $35. This is for an ore sample. You would have to contact them to see if they can analyse a solid metal piece. Carl
              >
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: ferrman1001 <ferrman1001@...>
              > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 9:46 PM
              > Subject: [hobbicast] Re: Analysing metal
              >
              >
              >
              > Thank you for all the answers. I will have to look into who does this in my local area. I was thinking of using a strong acid to dissolve the iron and weigh what's left over but getting someone to do a proper test will give a more valid result.
              >
              > Ernie
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
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            • auto249243
              ... Most likely done with an ICP AA. That is Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The sample is dissolved in acid. The acid is feed
              Message 6 of 12 , Dec 24, 2011
                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                Most likely done with an ICP AA. That is Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer.
                The sample is dissolved in acid. The acid is feed into a plasma flame(heated by RF induction). The light goes into a grating spectrophotometer. The spectrum from the grating is imaged by a chip just like in a digital camera and analyzed by computer for dark absorption lines of the elements. 50-60 elements at once, 0.1 gram sample, as low as parts per billion.
                Back in the mid-90's they ran about 100K per instrument. Thermo Jarell Ash, one company.
                Way more than you wanted to know. :)
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