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Repurposing a propane tank into casting furnace

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  • Chad M
    Here s an article I wrote on repurposing a propane tank into a casting furnace. I m interested in some feedback from the group. I plan on writing some
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 26, 2011
      Here's an article I wrote on repurposing a propane tank into a casting furnace. I'm interested in some feedback from the group. I plan on writing some followup articles in the next few weeks to cover the rest of the design... Any suggestions will be gladly accepted.

      http://www.toolboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=68&t=46
    • David
      the easy way to remove the valve is to use a two inch wide ratchet strap and strap the tank to a telephone pole or small tree with a wedge shaped piece of wood
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 26, 2011
        the easy way to remove the valve is to use a two inch wide ratchet strap and strap the tank to a telephone pole or small tree with a wedge shaped piece of wood inserted between the tank and whatever you strap it to, so that when you try to remove the valve it will roll up on the wedge adn lock itself in place.
        use a pipe wrench to simply unscrew the valve after first opening it to make sure the tank is empty, if the valve is one of the new style valves remove the bleeder screw from the valve with a screw driver. the new style valves have a check valve built into them.

        If the valve protector the handle is in the way cut it off with a hack saw.

        and easier and cheaper way to do this is to go too find someone that works on water wells and offer to tank a used tank off their hands for a couple of dollars lots cheaper than a propane tank that your going to need to fuel your new furnace with.

        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chad M" <chadnkrisie@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here's an article I wrote on repurposing a propane tank into a casting furnace. I'm interested in some feedback from the group. I plan on writing some followup articles in the next few weeks to cover the rest of the design... Any suggestions will be gladly accepted.
        >
        > http://www.toolboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=68&t=46
        >
      • Chad M
        Hi David, Thanks for the quick reply. Do you mind if I quote you in the article? I d like to include your ideas.
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 26, 2011
          Hi David,
          Thanks for the quick reply. Do you mind if I quote you in the article? I'd like to include your ideas.


          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "David" <superdave257@...> wrote:
          >
          > the easy way to remove the valve is to use a two inch wide ratchet strap and strap the tank to a telephone pole or small tree with a wedge shaped piece of wood inserted between the tank and whatever you strap it to, so that when you try to remove the valve it will roll up on the wedge adn lock itself in place.
          > use a pipe wrench to simply unscrew the valve after first opening it to make sure the tank is empty, if the valve is one of the new style valves remove the bleeder screw from the valve with a screw driver. the new style valves have a check valve built into them.
          >
          > If the valve protector the handle is in the way cut it off with a hack saw.
          >
          > and easier and cheaper way to do this is to go too find someone that works on water wells and offer to tank a used tank off their hands for a couple of dollars lots cheaper than a propane tank that your going to need to fuel your new furnace with.
          >
          > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chad M" <chadnkrisie@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Here's an article I wrote on repurposing a propane tank into a casting furnace. I'm interested in some feedback from the group. I plan on writing some followup articles in the next few weeks to cover the rest of the design... Any suggestions will be gladly accepted.
          > >
          > > http://www.toolboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=68&t=46
          > >
          >
        • Dave
          It would be nice if you could put some pictures in there! Dave D http://metalshop.homestead.com
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 26, 2011
            It would be nice if you could put some pictures in there!

            Dave D
            http://metalshop.homestead.com



            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chad M" <chadnkrisie@...> wrote:
            >
            > Here's an article I wrote on repurposing a propane tank into a casting furnace. I'm interested in some feedback from the group. I plan on writing some followup articles in the next few weeks to cover the rest of the design... Any suggestions will be gladly accepted.
            >
            > http://www.toolboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=68&t=46
            >
          • Jeshua Lacock
            ... I have used several discarded tanks myself. I just burned off all of the fuel first, then filled the bottle full of water before cutting the top off. Any
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 26, 2011
              On Mar 26, 2011, at 8:59 AM, Chad M wrote:

              > Here's an article I wrote on repurposing a propane tank into a casting furnace. I'm interested in some feedback from the group. I plan on writing some followup articles in the next few weeks to cover the rest of the design... Any suggestions will be gladly accepted.
              >
              > http://www.toolboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=68&t=46

              I have used several discarded tanks myself. I just burned off all of the fuel first, then filled the bottle full of water before cutting the top off. Any fuel left will be displaced from the water. Every time I go to the dump there are dozens of free bottles to pick from.

              I find it easy and fast to cut the top off with a air/electric grinder/cutter (no need for a plasma torch, but great if you have one). Just went through a few cutting discs. Cost me about $3.

              I think it is pretty easy to build a whole furnace in a weekend (stating it takes a whole summer might turn people in the wrong direction). Just need a bottle, can, wrapped sheet metal etc. for the case. Make a form (cardboard sauna tubs are ideal) and pour the refractory. Of course a bit of thought and design does go into the process. For instance, you want your intake to be angled towards the wall as much as possible to help create the ideal spiral exhaust.

              A Reil burner takes a couple hours to build and then you are up and running once the refractory cures. Ron Reil happens to live in the same (small) town as I do, I have been lucky enough to visit his shop. His burner is great, and just uses parts you can find on the shelf of practically any hardware store.


              Best,

              Jeshua Lacock, Owner
              <http://OpenOSX.com>
              phone: 208.462.4171
            • David
              as long as you correct my misspelled words and include me in the disclamier about your not responsible for anyone that gets hurt and all that kinda stuff.
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 27, 2011
                as long as you correct my misspelled words and include me in the disclamier about your not responsible for anyone that gets hurt and all that kinda stuff.

                David

                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chad M" <chadnkrisie@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi David,
                > Thanks for the quick reply. Do you mind if I quote you in the article? I'd like to include your ideas.
                >
                >
                > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "David" <superdave257@> wrote:
                > >
                > > the easy way to remove the valve is to use a two inch wide ratchet strap and strap the tank to a telephone pole or small tree with a wedge shaped piece of wood inserted between the tank and whatever you strap it to, so that when you try to remove the valve it will roll up on the wedge adn lock itself in place.
                > > use a pipe wrench to simply unscrew the valve after first opening it to make sure the tank is empty, if the valve is one of the new style valves remove the bleeder screw from the valve with a screw driver. the new style valves have a check valve built into them.
                > >
                > > If the valve protector the handle is in the way cut it off with a hack saw.
                > >
                > > and easier and cheaper way to do this is to go too find someone that works on water wells and offer to tank a used tank off their hands for a couple of dollars lots cheaper than a propane tank that your going to need to fuel your new furnace with.
                > >
                > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chad M" <chadnkrisie@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Here's an article I wrote on repurposing a propane tank into a casting furnace. I'm interested in some feedback from the group. I plan on writing some followup articles in the next few weeks to cover the rest of the design... Any suggestions will be gladly accepted.
                > > >
                > > > http://www.toolboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=68&t=46
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • Chad M
                Excellent, And thanks for the reminder about disclaimer....
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 28, 2011
                  Excellent, And thanks for the reminder about disclaimer....

                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "David" <superdave257@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > as long as you correct my misspelled words and include me in the disclamier about your not responsible for anyone that gets hurt and all that kinda stuff.
                  >
                  > David
                  >
                  > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chad M" <chadnkrisie@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi David,
                  > > Thanks for the quick reply. Do you mind if I quote you in the article? I'd like to include your ideas.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "David" <superdave257@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > the easy way to remove the valve is to use a two inch wide ratchet strap and strap the tank to a telephone pole or small tree with a wedge shaped piece of wood inserted between the tank and whatever you strap it to, so that when you try to remove the valve it will roll up on the wedge adn lock itself in place.
                  > > > use a pipe wrench to simply unscrew the valve after first opening it to make sure the tank is empty, if the valve is one of the new style valves remove the bleeder screw from the valve with a screw driver. the new style valves have a check valve built into them.
                  > > >
                  > > > If the valve protector the handle is in the way cut it off with a hack saw.
                  > > >
                  > > > and easier and cheaper way to do this is to go too find someone that works on water wells and offer to tank a used tank off their hands for a couple of dollars lots cheaper than a propane tank that your going to need to fuel your new furnace with.
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chad M" <chadnkrisie@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Here's an article I wrote on repurposing a propane tank into a casting furnace. I'm interested in some feedback from the group. I plan on writing some followup articles in the next few weeks to cover the rest of the design... Any suggestions will be gladly accepted.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > http://www.toolboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=68&t=46
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
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