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Re: [hobbicast] Suppliers near Raleigh, NC?

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  • kabowers@NorthState.net
    ... I was cleaning off my desk this AM and ran across a receipt from the supply place in Mebane, NC. I also checked a yellow pages on the Internet and they
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 26, 2011
      On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 16:22:24 -0500, you wrote:

      >Hello all!
      >
      >I'm new to this group, and just starting to run a small scale aluminum
      >foundry (hoping to move to bronze as well fairly soon). I'm trying to
      >upgrade my green sand. Does anyone have a good source for suitable
      >bentonite clay, at the small hobby foundry scale (20-50 lb of
      >bentonite), near Raleigh, NC? I can get clean 80 grit silica sand at
      >reasonable prices courtesy Liberty Arts in Durham, but if there are
      >other options for sand near Raleigh I'd love to know about those as
      >well. I've been using sifted play sand (~ 30 grit) and ground cat
      >litter (workable, but a pain, and I understand not the highest quality
      >option).
      >
      >Thanks in advance!
      >
      >Evan Daniel
      >TechShopRDU
      >http://techshoprdu.com
      >
      >
      >------------------------------------
      >
      I was cleaning off my desk this AM and ran across a receipt from
      the supply place in Mebane, NC. I also checked a yellow
      pages on the Internet and they seem to still exist. Looks
      like they are part of a multi state operation.

      Campbell's Ceramic Supply Co
      818 Trollingwood Hawfields Rd
      Mebane, NC 27302-8170
      Telephone: 336-578-9011

      Keith Bowers WB4LSJ- Thomasville, NC
    • Rupert
      Hello Group, I have been taking advantage of the using the wood heater in my shop through the cool weather to turn some oak into charcoal. In doing some
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 3, 2011
        Hello Group,
        I have been taking advantage of the using the wood heater in my shop
        through the cool weather to turn some oak into charcoal. In doing some
        research into how to grind it into a fine powder I found out charcoal
        (particularly fresh charcoal) can be pyrophoric when conditions are
        right. Figured I should pass that tid-bit on. No, I didn't find out the
        hard way.

        Rupert
        --

        yvt

        Rupert Wenig
        Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

        email: rwenig2@...

        http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
      • Ron Thompson
        ... Yikes! And I thought wood dust was bad. You can take the dry wood powder from a sander and put a little on your finger. Flick it with your other hand to
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 4, 2011
          On 3/3/2011 10:51 PM, Rupert wrote:
          >
          > Hello Group,
          > I have been taking advantage of the using the wood heater in my shop
          > through the cool weather to turn some oak into charcoal. In doing some
          > research into how to grind it into a fine powder I found out charcoal
          > (particularly fresh charcoal) can be pyrophoric when conditions are
          > right. Figured I should pass that tid-bit on. No, I didn't find out the
          > hard way.
          >
          > Rupert
          >
          Yikes!
          And I thought wood dust was bad. You can take the dry wood powder from a
          sander and put a little on your finger. Flick it with your other hand to
          make a cloud of dust. Do it into a candle flame and it whooshes to flame
          like hairspray!
          Ever heard of a dust explosion?

          --


          Ron Thompson
          On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

          There are two kinds of posts on newsgroups.
          1. This is what I have done...
          2. This is what I think...
          Be aware of the difference!

          http://www.ourcadguy.com/

          http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
          http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

          Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
          http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/








          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Rupert
          Hello Ron, The demise of many grain elevators were caused by grain dust explosions. That is one reason I am not using the dust control system in my shop yet as
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 4, 2011
            Hello Ron,
            The demise of many grain elevators were caused by grain dust
            explosions. That is one reason I am not using the dust control system in
            my shop yet as I don't have the proper bonding for static done yet.

            I posted the below to another group. It has links to explain what
            pyrophoric is.

            Quote:
            > What pyrophoric is a form of spontaneous combustion. See
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrophoricity>. This is another
            > interesting page
            > <http://ask.reference.com/related/Pyrophoric+Material?qsrc=2892&l=dse&o=102882>
            > on pyrophoric substances. I found some of the info hard to believe
            > but,,,,,,,,,,,,, The word pyrophoric came up when I was Googling for
            > ways to grind the charcoal lumps into powder so I Googled it to come
            > up with this page
            > <http://www.google.ca/search?q=pyrophoric&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a>
            > In other words, I get the impression to be careful with
            > powdered charcoal (and for that matter, many other powders).
            > Rupert



            On 3/4/2011 6:22 AM, Ron Thompson wrote:
            > On 3/3/2011 10:51 PM, Rupert wrote:
            >>
            >> Hello Group, I have been taking advantage of the using the wood
            >> heater in my shop through the cool weather to turn some oak into
            >> charcoal. In doing some research into how to grind it into a fine
            >> powder I found out charcoal (particularly fresh charcoal) can be
            >> pyrophoric when conditions are right. Figured I should pass that
            >> tid-bit on. No, I didn't find out the hard way.
            >>
            >> Rupert
            >>
            > Yikes! And I thought wood dust was bad. You can take the dry wood
            > powder from a sander and put a little on your finger. Flick it with
            > your other hand to make a cloud of dust. Do it into a candle flame
            > and it whooshes to flame like hairspray! Ever heard of a dust
            > explosion?
            >

            --

            yvt

            Rupert Wenig
            Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

            email: rwenig2@...

            http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
          • Malcolm Parker-Lisberg
            Rupert Pyrophoric carbon is a myth, see: Malcolm I don t suffer from insanity I enjoy it! ... From:
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 4, 2011
              Rupert
              Pyrophoric carbon is a myth, see:

              <http://www.fire.nist.gov/bfrlpubs/fire00/PDF/f00161.pdf>

              Malcolm

              I don't suffer from insanity I enjoy it!

              --- On Fri, 3/4/11, Rupert <rwenig2@...> wrote:

              From: Rupert <rwenig2@...>
              Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Making charcoal
              To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, March 4, 2011, 3:37 PM







               









              Hello Ron,

              The demise of many grain elevators were caused by grain dust

              explosions. That is one reason I am not using the dust control system in

              my shop yet as I don't have the proper bonding for static done yet.



              I posted the below to another group. It has links to explain what

              pyrophoric is.



              Quote:

              > What pyrophoric is a form of spontaneous combustion. See

              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrophoricity>. This is another

              > interesting page

              > <http://ask.reference.com/related/Pyrophoric+Material?qsrc=2892&l=dse&o=102882>

              > on pyrophoric substances. I found some of the info hard to believe

              > but,,,,,,,,,,,,, The word pyrophoric came up when I was Googling for

              > ways to grind the charcoal lumps into powder so I Googled it to come

              > up with this page

              > <http://www.google.ca/search?q=pyrophoric&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a>

              > In other words, I get the impression to be careful with

              > powdered charcoal (and for that matter, many other powders).

              > Rupert



              On 3/4/2011 6:22 AM, Ron Thompson wrote:

              > On 3/3/2011 10:51 PM, Rupert wrote:

              >>

              >> Hello Group, I have been taking advantage of the using the wood

              >> heater in my shop through the cool weather to turn some oak into

              >> charcoal. In doing some research into how to grind it into a fine

              >> powder I found out charcoal (particularly fresh charcoal) can be

              >> pyrophoric when conditions are right. Figured I should pass that

              >> tid-bit on. No, I didn't find out the hard way.

              >>

              >> Rupert

              >>

              > Yikes! And I thought wood dust was bad. You can take the dry wood

              > powder from a sander and put a little on your finger. Flick it with

              > your other hand to make a cloud of dust. Do it into a candle flame

              > and it whooshes to flame like hairspray! Ever heard of a dust

              > explosion?

              >



              --



              yvt



              Rupert Wenig

              Camrose, Alberta, Canada.



              email: rwenig2@...



              http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/























              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ron Thompson
              ... Thanks Rupert, When I read your first post, I didn t know what pyrophoric was, so I Googled it. I sometimes think Google knows everything. -- Ron Thompson
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 4, 2011
                On 3/4/2011 10:37 AM, Rupert wrote:
                >
                > Hello Ron,
                > The demise of many grain elevators were caused by grain dust
                > explosions. That is one reason I am not using the dust control system in
                > my shop yet as I don't have the proper bonding for static done yet.
                >
                > I posted the below to another group. It has links to explain what
                > pyrophoric is.
                >
                > Quote:
                > > What pyrophoric is a form of spontaneous combustion. See
                > > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrophoricity>. This is another
                > > interesting page
                > >
                > <http://ask.reference.com/related/Pyrophoric+Material?qsrc=2892&l=dse&o=102882
                > <http://ask.reference.com/related/Pyrophoric+Material?qsrc=2892&l=dse&o=102882>>
                > > on pyrophoric substances. I found some of the info hard to believe
                > > but,,,,,,,,,,,,, The word pyrophoric came up when I was Googling for
                > > ways to grind the charcoal lumps into powder so I Googled it to come
                > > up with this page
                > >
                > <http://www.google.ca/search?q=pyrophoric&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
                > <http://www.google.ca/search?q=pyrophoric&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a>>
                > > In other words, I get the impression to be careful with
                > > powdered charcoal (and for that matter, many other powders).
                > > Rupert
                >
                Thanks Rupert,
                When I read your first post, I didn't know what pyrophoric was, so I
                Googled it. I sometimes think Google knows everything.

                --


                Ron Thompson
                On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

                There are two kinds of posts on newsgroups.
                1. This is what I have done...
                2. This is what I think...
                Be aware of the difference!

                http://www.ourcadguy.com/

                http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
                http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

                Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
                http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/








                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Rupert
                Hello Malcolm, I saw that. I was inclined to agree with you as charcoal is shipped and sold in paper bags until I noted the statement Freshly prepared
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 4, 2011
                  Hello Malcolm,
                  I saw that. I was inclined to agree with you as charcoal is shipped
                  and sold in paper bags until I noted the statement "Freshly prepared
                  charcoal can be pyrophoric even when not powdered and it must be allowed
                  to stand for a day at least before it is used in any compositions." It
                  doesn't jib with then articles on this page
                  <http://raw-torrefactiontechnology.blogspot.com/2011/02/pyrophoric-carbon-oxygen-depletion-and.html>
                  <http://www.doctorfire.com/contents.html>. So which one is believable? I
                  chose to play it safe.
                  Your link probably applies to charcoal that is past the aging period.
                  Rupert

                  On 3/4/2011 9:52 AM, Malcolm Parker-Lisberg wrote:
                  > Rupert
                  > Pyrophoric carbon is a myth, see:
                  >
                  > <http://www.fire.nist.gov/bfrlpubs/fire00/PDF/f00161.pdf>
                  >
                  > Malcolm
                  >
                  > I don't suffer from insanity I enjoy it!
                  >
                  > --- On Fri, 3/4/11, Rupert<rwenig2@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: Rupert<rwenig2@...>
                  > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Making charcoal
                  > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Friday, March 4, 2011, 3:37 PM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Hello Ron,
                  >
                  > The demise of many grain elevators were caused by grain dust
                  >
                  > explosions. That is one reason I am not using the dust control system in
                  >
                  > my shop yet as I don't have the proper bonding for static done yet.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I posted the below to another group. It has links to explain what
                  >
                  > pyrophoric is.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Quote:
                  >
                  >> What pyrophoric is a form of spontaneous combustion. See
                  >
                  >> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrophoricity>. This is another
                  >
                  >> interesting page
                  >
                  >> <http://ask.reference.com/related/Pyrophoric+Material?qsrc=2892&l=dse&o=102882>
                  >
                  >> on pyrophoric substances. I found some of the info hard to believe
                  >
                  >> but,,,,,,,,,,,,, The word pyrophoric came up when I was Googling for
                  >
                  >> ways to grind the charcoal lumps into powder so I Googled it to come
                  >
                  >> up with this page
                  >
                  >> <http://www.google.ca/search?q=pyrophoric&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a>
                  >
                  >> In other words, I get the impression to be careful with
                  >
                  > > powdered charcoal (and for that matter, many other powders).
                  >
                  >> Rupert
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On 3/4/2011 6:22 AM, Ron Thompson wrote:
                  >
                  >> On 3/3/2011 10:51 PM, Rupert wrote:
                  >
                  >>>
                  >
                  >>> Hello Group, I have been taking advantage of the using the wood
                  >
                  >>> heater in my shop through the cool weather to turn some oak into
                  >
                  >>> charcoal. In doing some research into how to grind it into a fine
                  >
                  >>> powder I found out charcoal (particularly fresh charcoal) can be
                  >
                  >>> pyrophoric when conditions are right. Figured I should pass that
                  >
                  >>> tid-bit on. No, I didn't find out the hard way.
                  >
                  >>>
                  >
                  >>> Rupert
                  >
                  >>>
                  >
                  >> Yikes! And I thought wood dust was bad. You can take the dry wood
                  >
                  >> powder from a sander and put a little on your finger. Flick it with
                  >
                  >> your other hand to make a cloud of dust. Do it into a candle flame
                  >
                  >> and it whooshes to flame like hairspray! Ever heard of a dust
                  >
                  >> explosion?
                  >
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  --

                  yvt

                  Rupert Wenig
                  Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

                  email: rwenig2@...

                  http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
                • hillwizard2@aol.com
                  Charcoal is made in a kiln, it get very hot and is a good insulator Sometime when it is taken out of the kiln it contains red hot coals Mike the Hillwizard
                  Message 8 of 14 , Mar 4, 2011
                    Charcoal is made in a kiln, it get very hot and is a good insulator

                    Sometime when it is taken out of the kiln it contains red hot coals



                    Mike the Hillwizard

                    I would rather be nine people's favorite thing then one hundred people's
                    ninth favorite thing.


                    In a message dated 3/4/2011 5:12:17 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
                    rwenig2@... writes:

                    Hello Malcolm,
                    I saw that. I was inclined to agree with you as charcoal is shipped
                    and sold in paper bags until I noted the statement "Freshly prepared
                    charcoal can be pyrophoric even when not powdered and it must be allowed
                    to stand for a day at least before it is used in any compositions." It
                    doesn't jib with then articles on this page




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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