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Re: air source and oil choice

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  • abascirocco
    I was going to make the same suggestion. Consider that the stoichiometric ratio of propane is 15.5:1, which means in order to have a neutral flame every gram
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 13, 2011
      I was going to make the same suggestion. Consider that the stoichiometric ratio of propane is 15.5:1, which means in order to have a neutral flame every gram of propane requires 15.5 grams of combustion air and in something like a Reil or Oliver upwind burner that's ALL carried in by the venturi action created with the jet of high pressure propane; a jet of high pressure air would have a similar effect and so a relatively small amount of high pressure air could easily be used to move a large volume of low pressure air.

      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Gordon Haag <mr.meker@...> wrote:
      >
      > If you hook an air compressor up to an Oliver Upwind burner, it will give
      > you lots of low pressure air.
      >
      > On Thu, Jan 13, 2011 at 7:28 PM, <hillwizard2@...> wrote:
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > air compressor are very expensive, also they make small volumes of high
      > > pressure air, the furnace need large volumes of low pressure air
      > >
      > >
      > > Mike the Hillwizard
      > >
      > > "Quando omni flunkus moritati" Red Green
      > >
      > > In a message dated 1/13/2011 5:45:34 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
      > > steven.squier@... <steven.squier%40sbcglobal.net> writes:
      > >
      > > I've read lots of threads and websites, and have learned that a shop vac is
      > >
      > > a good source for forced air for your furnace. I have read lots of
      > > alternatives, but I have never seen where anyone is using an aircompressor.
      > > Is
      > > there a reason why not?
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Glenn N
      Along that thought, I have a vortec nozzle for my air gun that actually uses the stream of compressed air to entrain more air. Sort of a volumizer if you
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 14, 2011
        Along that thought, I have a vortec nozzle for my air gun that actually uses
        the stream of compressed air to entrain more air. Sort of a volumizer if
        you like.. Hmmm .. how about an airbrush?? Harbor freight has em or a few
        bucks and they have a wide range of adjustment...
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "abascirocco" <elammers@...>
        To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, January 13, 2011 10:45 PM
        Subject: [hobbicast] Re: air source and oil choice


        I was going to make the same suggestion. Consider that the stoichiometric
        ratio of propane is 15.5:1, which means in order to have a neutral flame
        every gram of propane requires 15.5 grams of combustion air and in something
        like a Reil or Oliver upwind burner that's ALL carried in by the venturi
        action created with the jet of high pressure propane; a jet of high pressure
        air would have a similar effect and so a relatively small amount of high
        pressure air could easily be used to move a large volume of low pressure
        air.

        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Gordon Haag <mr.meker@...> wrote:
        >
        > If you hook an air compressor up to an Oliver Upwind burner, it will give
        > you lots of low pressure air.
        >
        > On Thu, Jan 13, 2011 at 7:28 PM, <hillwizard2@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > air compressor are very expensive, also they make small volumes of high
        > > pressure air, the furnace need large volumes of low pressure air
        > >
        > >
        > > Mike the Hillwizard
        > >
        > > "Quando omni flunkus moritati" Red Green
        > >
        > > In a message dated 1/13/2011 5:45:34 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
        > > steven.squier@... <steven.squier%40sbcglobal.net> writes:
        > >
        > > I've read lots of threads and websites, and have learned that a shop vac
        > > is
        > >
        > > a good source for forced air for your furnace. I have read lots of
        > > alternatives, but I have never seen where anyone is using an
        > > aircompressor.
        > > Is
        > > there a reason why not?
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >




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      • abascirocco
        Google the term air dryer gun and you ll find commercial designed to exploit the effect we re talking about. Air brushes are designed to entrain a liquid
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 14, 2011
          Google the term "air dryer gun" and you'll find commercial designed to exploit the effect we're talking about.

          Air brushes are designed to entrain a liquid i.e. paint into an air stream, I've seen guys use them to make effective oil burners.

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn N" <sleykin@...> wrote:
          >
          > Along that thought, I have a vortec nozzle for my air gun that actually uses
          > the stream of compressed air to entrain more air. Sort of a volumizer if
          > you like.. Hmmm .. how about an airbrush?? Harbor freight has em or a few
          > bucks and they have a wide range of adjustment...
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "abascirocco" <elammers@...>
          > To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Thursday, January 13, 2011 10:45 PM
          > Subject: [hobbicast] Re: air source and oil choice
          >
          >
          > I was going to make the same suggestion. Consider that the stoichiometric
          > ratio of propane is 15.5:1, which means in order to have a neutral flame
          > every gram of propane requires 15.5 grams of combustion air and in something
          > like a Reil or Oliver upwind burner that's ALL carried in by the venturi
          > action created with the jet of high pressure propane; a jet of high pressure
          > air would have a similar effect and so a relatively small amount of high
          > pressure air could easily be used to move a large volume of low pressure
          > air.
          >
          > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Gordon Haag <mr.meker@> wrote:
          > >
          > > If you hook an air compressor up to an Oliver Upwind burner, it will give
          > > you lots of low pressure air.
          > >
          > > On Thu, Jan 13, 2011 at 7:28 PM, <hillwizard2@> wrote:
          > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > air compressor are very expensive, also they make small volumes of high
          > > > pressure air, the furnace need large volumes of low pressure air
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Mike the Hillwizard
          > > >
          > > > "Quando omni flunkus moritati" Red Green
          > > >
          > > > In a message dated 1/13/2011 5:45:34 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
          > > > steven.squier@ <steven.squier%40sbcglobal.net> writes:
          > > >
          > > > I've read lots of threads and websites, and have learned that a shop vac
          > > > is
          > > >
          > > > a good source for forced air for your furnace. I have read lots of
          > > > alternatives, but I have never seen where anyone is using an
          > > > aircompressor.
          > > > Is
          > > > there a reason why not?
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
          > this list does not accept attachments.
          >
          > Files area and list services are at:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
          >
          > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
          > check out these two affiliated sites:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
          >
          > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
          > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
          >
          > List Owner:
          > owly@...
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
        • Robert Chilson
          Has anyone looked at a babbington burner in the waste watts group. they are exceptional waste oil burners that can use dirty fryer oil and not get clogged up.
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 16, 2011
            Has anyone looked at a babbington burner in the waste watts group. they
            are exceptional waste oil burners that can use dirty fryer oil and not
            get clogged up. They also use compressed air to power them (about
            80psi). I'm thinking about building one for a can recycling furnace,
            kind like a bath furnace.
          • Kerri Duncan
            If you would like more info and to see a few builds going on with Babbington burners- head over to backyardmetalcasting.com in the burner
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 16, 2011
              If you would like more info and to see a few builds going on with Babbington burners- head over to backyardmetalcasting.com in the burner engineering/construction forum thread. This group here is great for reference as well as theat one also.
              Kerri

              --- On Sun, 1/16/11, Robert Chilson <rchilso@...> wrote:


              From: Robert Chilson <rchilso@...>
              Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: air source and oil choice
              To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, January 16, 2011, 6:22 AM


               



              Has anyone looked at a babbington burner in the waste watts group. they
              are exceptional waste oil burners that can use dirty fryer oil and not
              get clogged up. They also use compressed air to power them (about
              80psi). I'm thinking about building one for a can recycling furnace,
              kind like a bath furnace.








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