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Re: [hobbicast] Re: [HomeFoundry_and_Casting] New Coffee can furnace

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  • michael.a.porter@comcast.net
    Rupert, I hope you ll write up the tool making process and take photos too. This should be just what people building CC furnaces need to learn next. I have
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 7, 2010
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      Rupert,
      I hope you'll write up the tool making process and take photos too. This should be just what people building CC furnaces need to learn next. I have decided to build my own tool set just like the charges were going to be large, but mainly this is to make things like the crucible tongs as fool proof as possible; not because they are best built that way, but once I become familiar with the process, I want the CC furnace and tools kept safe for beginners to play with (for show and tell). For instance, it wouldn't be good for a nervous first timer to crack the crucible from gripping it too tightly, or to let it slip out of the tongs while trying to avoid doing so.
      Mikey

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Rupert <rwenig2@...>
      To: HomeFoundry and Casting <HomeFoundry_and_Casting@yahoogroups.com>, castinghobby@yahoogroups.com, hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, 06 Oct 2010 03:29:18 -0000 (UTC)
      Subject: [hobbicast] Re: [HomeFoundry_and_Casting] New Coffee can furnace





























      Hello All,


      Just an update. My CC furnace came to life again today after receiving


      a coating of ITC100. Ran it at low heat to make sure the coating was


      dried out and then slowly brought the heat up to full heat. I ran it at


      full heat until I could see lots of red inside and shut the burner off.


      The crucible I have needed curing too so I stuck it inside the warm


      furnace to let it warm as the furnace cooled. I lit the furnace about an


      hour later and slowly brought the temp up until the crucible glowed red.


      Figured I'd take advantage of the heat so I stuck an old aluminum sprue


      (about 1 1/2 lb) into the crucible and melted it. I didn't time it as I


      was doing other things at the same time but I was happy with the melt.


      Now I have to make a new set of tools- skimmer, ingot molds, etc. :-)



      Rupert


      --



      yvt



      Rupert Wenig


      Camrose, Alberta, Canada.



      email: rwenig2@...

      http://sz0093.ev.mail.comcast.net/zimbra/h/%3Cspan%20class=" yui-spellcheck?>http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/" target=_blank>http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/











      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rupert
      Hello Mikey, Will try. I will be posting a few pics later. I have to correct a statement I mad about the amount of aluminum I melted as I weighed it today. It
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 7, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Mikey,
        Will try. I will be posting a few pics later.

        I have to correct a statement I mad about the amount of aluminum I
        melted as I weighed it today. It turns out it weighed just over 1 lb.,
        not 1 1/2 lb as I stated. I plan to fill it next time I do a melt and
        then weigh the melt after it cools for my own satisfaction if for no
        other reason.
        I could be wrong about my crucible size too. The one I have measures 3
        3/8" top dia., 2 1/4" bottom dia. and it's 3 3/4" tall. I still think it
        is a #2 but I can't find a crucible chart that shows a crucible with
        similar dimensions.
        The tools I'm making for the CC furnace are simple ones. The skimmer is
        made out of a teaspoon. My tongs for the clay graphite crucible are dual
        purpose used for lifting the crucible and for pouring. it's the same
        design I use for my larger furnace where I find it works well. One of my
        ingot molds is a small size muffin pan coated heavily with graphite ( a
        rust coating would do too). The other ingot mold I'm making is made out
        of old bed frame angle iron.I'll post on it when it is finished. I need
        a stirring rod yet. I could use wood but I think I will just buy a
        graphite rod for that purpose as they are not that expensive.
        I'm going now to edit and put up some pictures in my folder so stay tuned.

        Rupert



        On 10/7/2010 1:43 PM, michael.a.porter@... wrote:
        > Rupert, I hope you'll write up the tool making process and take
        > photos too. This should be just what people building CC furnaces need
        > to learn next. I have decided to build my own tool set just like the
        > charges were going to be large, but mainly this is to make things
        > like the crucible tongs as fool proof as possible; not because they
        > are best built that way, but once I become familiar with the process,
        > I want the CC furnace and tools kept safe for beginners to play with
        > (for show and tell). For instance, it wouldn't be good for a nervous
        > first timer to crack the crucible from gripping it too tightly, or to
        > let it slip out of the tongs while trying to avoid doing so. Mikey
        >
        > ----- Original Message ----- From: Rupert<rwenig2@...> To:
        > HomeFoundry and Casting<HomeFoundry_and_Casting@yahoogroups.com>,
        > castinghobby@yahoogroups.com, hobbicast@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed, 06
        > Oct 2010 03:29:18 -0000 (UTC) Subject: [hobbicast] Re:
        > [HomeFoundry_and_Casting] New Coffee can furnace
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hello All,
        >
        >
        > Just an update. My CC furnace came to life again today after
        > receiving
        >
        >
        > a coating of ITC100. Ran it at low heat to make sure the coating was
        >
        >
        > dried out and then slowly brought the heat up to full heat. I ran it
        > at
        >
        >
        > full heat until I could see lots of red inside and shut the burner
        > off.
        >
        >
        > The crucible I have needed curing too so I stuck it inside the warm
        >
        >
        > furnace to let it warm as the furnace cooled. I lit the furnace about
        > an
        >
        >
        > hour later and slowly brought the temp up until the crucible glowed
        > red.
        >
        >
        > Figured I'd take advantage of the heat so I stuck an old aluminum
        > sprue
        >
        >
        > (about 1 1/2 lb) into the crucible and melted it. I didn't time it as
        > I
        >
        >
        > was doing other things at the same time but I was happy with the
        > melt.
        >
        >
        > Now I have to make a new set of tools- skimmer, ingot molds, etc.
        > :-)
        >
        >
        >
        > Rupert
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG -
        > www.avg.com Version: 9.0.862 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3182 - Release
        > Date: 10/07/10 00:34:00
        >

        --

        yvt

        Rupert Wenig
        Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

        email: rwenig2@...

        http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
      • michael.a.porter@comcast.net
        Rupert, It is hard to find anything resembling crucible charts because most crucibles are rated by their manufacturers in accordance with the amount of charge
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 8, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Rupert,
          It is hard to find anything resembling crucible charts because most crucibles are rated by their manufacturers in accordance with the amount of charge they are supposed to hold (by weight). However weight is given as pounds of aluminum for the majority of crucibles, and by weight in gold for jewelers crucibles. However, getting back to your crucible, it is very close to the #2 size "A" crucible in Budget Casting Supply crucible lists: http://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/Crucibles.php">http://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/Crucibles.php If you look at Legend Mining Supply crucibles, you will note size variations between different manufacturers: lmine.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=LMS&Category_Code=crucibles">http://www.lmine.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=LMS&Category_Code=crucibles So, a perfect dimensional match to Budget's #A-2 crucible could only be happen if the crucible came from the same source as theirs.

          I like your tongs design, but plan to build a set that lock closed on each other with the crucible held loosely and trapped by a top hook. The point being to make up for lack of experience in the user, and avoid collective damage to some of my more expensive crucibles.
          Mikey

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Rupert <rwenig2@...>
          To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, 08 Oct 2010 02:40:48 -0000 (UTC)
          Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: [HomeFoundry_and_Casting] New Coffee can furnace





















          Hello Mikey,


          Will try. I will be posting a few pics later.



          I have to correct a statement I mad about the amount of aluminum I


          melted as I weighed it today. It turns out it weighed just over 1 lb.,


          not 1 1/2 lb as I stated. I plan to fill it next time I do a melt and


          then weigh the melt after it cools for my own satisfaction if for no


          other reason.


          I could be wrong about my crucible size too. The one I have measures 3


          3/8" top dia., 2 1/4" bottom dia. and it's 3 3/4" tall. I still think it


          is a #2 but I can't find a crucible chart that shows a crucible with


          similar dimensions.


          The tools I'm making for the CC furnace are simple ones. The skimmer is


          made out of a teaspoon. My tongs for the clay graphite crucible are dual


          purpose used for lifting the crucible and for pouring. it's the same


          design I use for my larger furnace where I find it works well. One of my


          ingot molds is a small size muffin pan coated heavily with graphite ( a


          rust coating would do too). The other ingot mold I'm making is made out


          of old bed frame angle iron.I'll post on it when it is finished. I need


          a stirring rod yet. I could use wood but I think I will just buy a


          graphite rod for that purpose as they are not that expensive.


          I'm going now to edit and put up some pictures in my folder so stay tuned.



          Rupert



          On 10/7/2010 1:43 PM, michael.a.porter%40comcast.net" target=_blank>michael.a.porter@... wrote:


          > Rupert, I hope you'll write up the tool making process and take


          > photos too. This should be just what people building CC furnaces need


          > to learn next. I have decided to build my own tool set just like the


          > charges were going to be large, but mainly this is to make things


          > like the crucible tongs as fool proof as possible; not because they


          > are best built that way, but once I become familiar with the process,


          > I want the CC furnace and tools kept safe for beginners to play with


          > (for show and tell). For instance, it wouldn't be good for a nervous


          > first timer to crack the crucible from gripping it too tightly, or to


          > let it slip out of the tongs while trying to avoid doing so. Mikey


          >


          > ----- Original Message ----- From: Rupert<rwenig2@...> To:


          > HomeFoundry and Casting<HomeFoundry_and_Casting@yahoogroups.com>,


          > castinghobby%40yahoogroups.com" target=_blank>castinghobby@yahoogroups.com, hobbicast@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed, 06


          > Oct 2010 03:29:18 -0000 (UTC) Subject: [hobbicast] Re:


          > [HomeFoundry_and_Casting] New Coffee can furnace


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          > Hello All,


          >


          >


          > Just an update. My CC furnace came to life again today after


          > receiving


          >


          >


          > a coating of ITC100. Ran it at low heat to make sure the coating was


          >


          >


          > dried out and then slowly brought the heat up to full heat. I ran it


          > at


          >


          >


          > full heat until I could see lots of red inside and shut the burner


          > off.


          >


          >


          > The crucible I have needed curing too so I stuck it inside the warm


          >


          >


          > furnace to let it warm as the furnace cooled. I lit the furnace about


          > an


          >


          >


          > hour later and slowly brought the temp up until the crucible glowed


          > red.


          >


          >


          > Figured I'd take advantage of the heat so I stuck an old aluminum


          > sprue


          >


          >


          > (about 1 1/2 lb) into the crucible and melted it. I didn't time it as


          > I


          >


          >


          > was doing other things at the same time but I was happy with the


          > melt.


          >


          >


          > Now I have to make a new set of tools- skimmer, ingot molds, etc.


          > :-)


          >


          >


          >


          > Rupert


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          >


          > No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG -


          > www.avg.com Version: 9.0.862 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3182 - Release


          > Date: 10/07/10 00:34:00


          >



          --



          yvt



          Rupert Wenig


          Camrose, Alberta, Canada.



          email: rwenig2@...

          http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/









          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Rupert
          Hello Mikey, ... That s what I m finding out. The #2 size BCS and LMS show in their charts will be too large for my furnace. I can t get more where I got the
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 9, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Hello Mikey,


            On 10/8/2010 10:36 AM, michael.a.porter@... wrote:
            > Rupert, It is hard to find anything resembling crucible charts
            > because most crucibles are rated by their manufacturers in accordance
            > with the amount of charge they are supposed to hold (by weight).

            That's what I'm finding out. The #2 size BCS and LMS show in their
            charts will be too large for my furnace. I can't get more where I got
            the crucible I have as I bought it on a going out of stock clearance
            sale. Guess I have to keep looking or settle for using a #1.

            > However weight is given as pounds of aluminum for the majority of
            > crucibles, and by weight in gold for jewelers crucibles. However,

            I intend to fill the crucible next time I do a melt and weigh the
            charge afterwards to confirm the size I actually have.

            > getting back to your crucible, it is very close to the #2 size "A"
            > crucible in Budget Casting Supply crucible lists:
            > http://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/Crucibles.php">http://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/Crucibles.php
            > If you look at Legend Mining Supply crucibles, you will note size
            > variations between different manufacturers:
            > lmine.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=LMS&Category_Code=crucibles">http://www.lmine.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=LMS&Category_Code=crucibles
            > So, a perfect dimensional match to Budget's #A-2 crucible could only
            > be happen if the crucible came from the same source as theirs.
            >
            > I like your tongs design, but plan to build a set that lock closed on
            > each other with the crucible held loosely and trapped by a top hook.
            > The point being to make up for lack of experience in the user, and
            > avoid collective damage to some of my more expensive crucibles.

            A hook can be added to my tong design if desired. My tongs hold a
            crucible well for both lifting and pouring when they are properly
            adjusted to fit the particular crucible. There is little danger of
            loosing a full crucible when it is right side up. The danger of loosing
            the crucible is when it is empty and upside down. I did loose an empty
            crucible once when I neglected to check the adjustment before I went to
            lift a crucible. The crucible was hot but empty at the time.
            Checking the adjustment of the tongs is easy when the crucible is cold.
            Simple grab the crucible with the tongs as you would to lift it out of
            the furnace, turn it upside down. The pressure on the crucible should be
            just enough to hold the empty crucible with a little shaking. That
            amount of pressure won't hurt the crucible either.

            Rupert

            > Mikey
            >
            --

            yvt

            Rupert Wenig
            Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

            email: rwenig2@...

            http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
          • michael.a.porter@comcast.net
            Rupert, You should find the following excerpts from my next book of personal interest: Crucible Tongs use a “scissors action” to close two metal rods
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 9, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Rupert,
              You should find the following excerpts from my next book of personal interest:




              Crucible Tongs use a “scissors action” to close two metal rods (shaped to match the crucible wall), which are pinned together just behind their pincer arms. Laboratory tongs are smaller lighter versions of crucible tongs, and are meant to handle heated glass beakers, but can serve well enough for up to thirty-gram jewelers crucibles. You can find them at some jewelers supply stores, laboratory supply dealers, and through eBay. There are also small jewelers crucible tongs made from shaped flat bar, available from the same sources; these don’t look as fancy, but actually are more ergonomic in use.


              Large tongs can often be purchased from suppliers of blacksmith tools, heated, and then reshaped to fit your crucible. For a lot less money than the price of a pair of blacksmith tongs, you can buy a book on blacksmithing, and build your own tongs by employing your crucible furnace as a gas forge. More complicated pull-out tongs, latched hand shanks (single operator), and single ended shanks (two operators) can be purchased through foundry supply dealers, such as Budget Casting Supply, and have the advantage that they were made to fit the crucibles supplied by the same sources.


              When making your tongs, you want to keep in mind that they not only have to hold the crucible securely, but also do so without fracturing it. For larger crucibles, or those meant to be used by novices, a good loose fit with a moderate amount of contact area (ex. tapered flat bar in the tongs area), a variable stop to ensure the right amount of applied pressure, and a top hook trapping the crucible, assure perfect performance every time. So how do you set the stop for the right amount of pressure?


              According to Rupert Wenig, a long time hobby caster from Camrose, Canada, small crucibles should be gently gripped while empty, turned upside down, and given a couple of shakes. The amount of pressure needed to hold the crucible during this test is sufficient to keep it trapped during an actual pour, without harming it.You also want to exchange any (finger and thumb) circles found on laboratory tongs for straight sections of tubing, to keep the tongs comfortably ergonomic through
              the twisting motion used to empty a crucible’s charge into your mold.

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Rupert <rwenig2@...>
              To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sat, 09 Oct 2010 18:47:47 -0000 (UTC)
              Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: [HomeFoundry_and_Casting] New Coffee can furnace





















              Hello Mikey,




              On 10/8/2010 10:36 AM, michael.a.porter%40comcast.net" target=_blank>michael.a.porter@... wrote:


              > Rupert, It is hard to find anything resembling crucible charts


              > because most crucibles are rated by their manufacturers in accordance


              > with the amount of charge they are supposed to hold (by weight).



              That's what I'm finding out. The #2 size BCS and LMS show in their


              charts will be too large for my furnace. I can't get more where I got


              the crucible I have as I bought it on a going out of stock clearance


              sale. Guess I have to keep looking or settle for using a #1.



              > However weight is given as pounds of aluminum for the majority of


              > crucibles, and by weight in gold for jewelers crucibles. However,



              I intend to fill the crucible next time I do a melt and weigh the


              charge afterwards to confirm the size I actually have.



              > getting back to your crucible, it is very close to the #2 size "A"


              > crucible in Budget Casting Supply crucible lists:


              > http://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/Crucibles.php" target=_blank>http://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/Crucibles.php">http://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/Crucibles.php


              > If you look at Legend Mining Supply crucibles, you will note size


              > variations between different manufacturers:


              > lmine.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=LMS&Category_Code=crucibles">http://www.lmine.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=LMS&Category_Code=crucibles


              > So, a perfect dimensional match to Budget's #A-2 crucible could only


              > be happen if the crucible came from the same source as theirs.


              >


              > I like your tongs design, but plan to build a set that lock closed on


              > each other with the crucible held loosely and trapped by a top hook.


              > The point being to make up for lack of experience in the user, and


              > avoid collective damage to some of my more expensive crucibles.



              A hook can be added to my tong design if desired. My tongs hold a


              crucible well for both lifting and pouring when they are properly


              adjusted to fit the particular crucible. There is little danger of


              loosing a full crucible when it is right side up. The danger of loosing


              the crucible is when it is empty and upside down. I did loose an empty


              crucible once when I neglected to check the adjustment before I went to


              lift a crucible. The crucible was hot but empty at the time.


              Checking the adjustment of the tongs is easy when the crucible is cold.


              Simple grab the crucible with the tongs as you would to lift it out of


              the furnace, turn it upside down. The pressure on the crucible should be


              just enough to hold the empty crucible with a little shaking. That


              amount of pressure won't hurt the crucible either.



              Rupert



              > Mikey


              >


              --



              yvt



              Rupert Wenig


              Camrose, Alberta, Canada.



              email: rwenig2@...

              http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/









              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Rupert
              Hello Mikey, I can t wait for your next book to hit he market. Do you have an estimated release date? Rupert ... -- yvt Rupert Wenig Camrose, Alberta, Canada.
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 9, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello Mikey,
                I can't wait for your next book to hit he market. Do you have an
                estimated release date?

                Rupert

                On 10/9/2010 2:24 PM, michael.a.porter@... wrote:
                > Rupert, You should find the following excerpts from my next book of
                > personal interest:
                >
                >
                >
                --

                yvt

                Rupert Wenig
                Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

                email: rwenig2@...

                http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/
              • michael.a.porter@comcast.net
                Rupert, I have 217 pages of text without adding a single drawing or photo. Yet, there are months of work to go before it s finished. I had thought to be
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 10, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  Rupert,
                  I have 217 pages of text without adding a single drawing or photo. Yet, there are months of work to go before it's finished. I had thought to be publishing already, but these books take the author where they want to go; they're not over until they're done. Hopefully that will happen by spring. I will finish the atmospheric burner section by Xmas, but there are still the fan-blown burners, and equipment sections after that.
                  Mikey

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Rupert <rwenig2@...>
                  To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sat, 09 Oct 2010 21:20:37 -0000 (UTC)
                  Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: [HomeFoundry_and_Casting] New Coffee can furnace





















                  Hello Mikey,


                  I can't wait for your next book to hit he market. Do you have an


                  estimated release date?



                  Rupert



                  On 10/9/2010 2:24 PM, michael.a.porter%40comcast.net" target=_blank>michael.a.porter@... wrote:


                  > Rupert, You should find the following excerpts from my next book of


                  > personal interest:


                  >


                  >


                  >


                  --



                  yvt



                  Rupert Wenig


                  Camrose, Alberta, Canada.



                  email: rwenig2@...

                  http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/" target=_blank>http://users.xplornet.com/~rwenig/Home/









                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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