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No Joy 3D

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  • Rod
    My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer were unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me samples of a couple
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 9, 2010
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      My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer were unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me samples of a couple models. There is a photo plus a closeup of the models in the photo's section <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/photos/album/738747855/pic/list> under Grantham. By using the 'change zoom level' in your browser you should be able to see the little jaggies that don't release cleanly from the sand.

      Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Guess I'll have to stick with photopolymer for the time being.

      Rod
    • Rupert
      Hello Rod, The idea was so promising. I m sorry that you got let down. I think investment is the way to go with those prints. Rupert ... -- yvt Rupert Wenig
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 9, 2010
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        Hello Rod,
        The idea was so promising. I'm sorry that you got let down. I think
        investment is the way to go with those prints.

        Rupert

        On 7/9/2010 8:40 PM, Rod wrote:
        > My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer
        > were unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me
        > samples of a couple models. There is a photo plus a closeup of the
        > models in the photo's
        > section<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/photos/album/738747855/pic/list>
        > under Grantham. By using the 'change zoom level' in your browser you
        > should be able to see the little jaggies that don't release cleanly
        > from the sand.
        >
        > Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Guess I'll have to stick with
        > photopolymer for the time being.
        >
        > Rod
        >
        >
        >
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        Rupert Wenig
        Camrose, Alberta, Canada.

        email: rwenig2@...

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      • Ron Thompson
        I attended a demo of 3d printers at a Solidworks meeting. They said, depending on the plastic used, you can smooth it with a chemical, I seem to recall lacquer
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 9, 2010
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          I attended a demo of 3d printers at a Solidworks meeting.
          They said, depending on the plastic used, you can smooth it with a
          chemical, I seem to recall lacquer thinner or something like that. It
          can also be sanded or flame smoothed.
          The newer machines print at a finer resolution, as well. They can
          duplicate features of .010"
          They showed some samples that were chrome plated and smooth and shiny.

          On 7/9/2010 10:40 PM, Rod wrote:
          >
          >
          > My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer were
          > unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me samples of
          > a couple models. There is a photo plus a closeup of the models in the
          > photo's section
          > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/photos/album/738747855/pic/list> under
          > Grantham. By using the 'change zoom level' in your browser you should be
          > able to see the little jaggies that don't release cleanly from the sand.
          >
          > Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Guess I'll have to stick with
          > photopolymer for the time being.
          >
          > Rod
          >
          >


          --


          Ron Thompson Riding my '07 XL883C Sportster
          On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space
          Center, USA

          The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance; it is the illusion
          of knowledge.
          —Daniel J. Boorstin

          http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
          http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

          Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
          http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/
        • abascirocco
          Earlier this year I attended a large manufacturing technologies trade show and had an opportunity to see 3d printers from several different manufacturers in
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 10, 2010
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            Earlier this year I attended a large manufacturing technologies trade show and had an opportunity to see 3d printers from several different manufacturers in action. My general impression was that it seemed like a technology (several technologies really) still very much in their infancy, very promising but leaving a lot to be desired in terms of build quality, build time, ease of use and expense. It reminded me a lot of the microcomputer industry around 1980, just prior to the introduction of the first IBM PC, very unfocused with lots of competing companies geared towards niche users but little or nothing suitable for the everyday business user. The introduction of the first PC changed all that, it marked a paradigm shift, new markets were created along with millions of new users and the industry and everything related to it boomed. The 3D printer industry seems poised for a similar shift, I wish I knew what it would take to make that happen and when because, there's a TON of money to be made by whomever gets it right first.

            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Rod" <rodney_grantham@...> wrote:
            >
            > My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer were unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me samples of a couple models. There is a photo plus a closeup of the models in the photo's section <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/photos/album/738747855/pic/list> under Grantham. By using the 'change zoom level' in your browser you should be able to see the little jaggies that don't release cleanly from the sand.
            >
            > Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Guess I'll have to stick with photopolymer for the time being.
            >
            > Rod
            >
          • oldstudentmsgt
            You could try dipping it in wax, which would smooth (somewhat) that jagged surface. Or just burn out and investment cast them. Or maybe use a coarser sand,
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 10, 2010
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              You could try dipping it in wax, which would smooth (somewhat) that jagged surface. Or just burn out and investment cast them. Or maybe use a coarser sand, although then you'd have to do more finish machining...

              Cast them in vacuum or vibration packed loose sand as a lost-object casting? If the jaggies aren't a problem for your application in the finished product, that might work if the material will get lost properly.

              Good luck!

              Bill in OKC

              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Rod" <rodney_grantham@...> wrote:
              >
              > My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer were unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me samples of a couple models. There is a photo plus a closeup of the models in the photo's section <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/photos/album/738747855/pic/list> under Grantham. By using the 'change zoom level' in your browser you should be able to see the little jaggies that don't release cleanly from the sand.
              >
              > Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Guess I'll have to stick with photopolymer for the time being.
              >
              > Rod
              >
            • David Patterson
              You need to treat it like a piece of wood all the steps need to be sanded down paint with a filling primer until thepart is smooth. I have used .stl models for
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 10, 2010
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                You need to treat it like a piece of wood all the steps need to be sanded down paint with a filling primer until thepart is smooth. I have used .stl models for patterns and they can make some nice castings. thick wall .stl models may not be solid(some liquid inside) this would need to be drained and filled with an epoxy. Or request that the model be made solid.

                Dave Patterson
                odd_kins@...
                http://home.comcast.net/~oddkins/foundry_home.html

                --- On Fri, 7/9/10, Rod <rodney_grantham@...> wrote:


                From: Rod <rodney_grantham@...>
                Subject: [hobbicast] No Joy 3D
                To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, July 9, 2010, 7:40 PM


                 



                My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer were unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me samples of a couple models. There is a photo plus a closeup of the models in the photo's section <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/photos/album/738747855/pic/list> under Grantham. By using the 'change zoom level' in your browser you should be able to see the little jaggies that don't release cleanly from the sand.

                Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Guess I'll have to stick with photopolymer for the time being.

                Rod











                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Rod
                Thanks guys for all the suggestions. They all seem to have merit, but I have no plans to pursue this any further. Rod
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 10, 2010
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                  Thanks guys for all the suggestions. They all seem to have merit, but I have no plans to pursue this any further. Rod
                • michael.a.porter@comcast.net
                  Hi Dave, Missed you at the last breakfast meeting. The guys said you were busy working on you property. Mikey ... From: David Patterson
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 10, 2010
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                    Hi Dave,
                    Missed you at the last breakfast meeting. The guys said you were busy working on you property.
                    Mikey

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: David Patterson <odd_kins@...>
                    To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sat, 10 Jul 2010 15:30:51 -0000 (UTC)
                    Subject: Re: [hobbicast] No Joy 3D













                    You need to treat it like a piece of wood all the steps need to be sanded down paint with a filling primer until thepart is smooth. I have used .stl models for patterns and they can make some nice castings. thick wall .stl models may not be solid(some liquid inside) this would need to be drained and filled with an epoxy. Or request that the model be made solid.



                    Dave Patterson
                    odd_kins@...
                    http://home.comcast.net/~oddkins/foundry_home.html



                    --- On Fri, 7/9/10, Rod <rodney_grantham@...> wrote:



                    From: Rod <rodney_grantham@...>


                    Subject: [hobbicast] No Joy 3D


                    To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com


                    Date: Friday, July 9, 2010, 7:40 PM







                    My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer were unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me samples of a couple models. There is a photo plus a closeup of the models in the photo's section <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/photos/album/738747855/pic/list> under Grantham. By using the 'change zoom level' in your browser you should be able to see the little jaggies that don't release cleanly from the sand.



                    Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Guess I'll have to stick with photopolymer for the time being.



                    Rod



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Jeshua Lacock
                    ... I would just point out that not all 3D printers are created equal either. My client Legacy Effects used a PolyJet 3D printer to print out finished (minus
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 10, 2010
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                      On Jul 10, 2010, at 1:15 PM, Rod wrote:

                      > Thanks guys for all the suggestions. They all seem to have merit, but I have no plans to pursue this any further. Rod

                      I would just point out that not all 3D printers are created equal either.

                      My client Legacy Effects used a PolyJet 3D printer to print out finished (minus the paint) parts for Iron Man 2:

                      http://www.fastcompany.com/1640497/ironman-2s-secret-sauce-3-d-printing

                      They have spun off a new business based on it:

                      http://www.repligrow.com/

                      See their slideshow at:

                      http://www.repligrow.com/project1.html

                      They take the parts straight off the printer and make a silicon mold of them.


                      Best,

                      Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                      <http://OpenOSX.com>
                      phone: 208.462.4171
                    • David Patterson
                      Yea, I got 40 acres to keep me busy. wait till I get the foundry going :-). the grapes beer brewing and outdoor cooking.   so how things going with everyone?
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jul 10, 2010
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                        Yea, I got 40 acres to keep me busy. wait till I get the foundry going :-). the grapes beer brewing and outdoor cooking.
                         
                        so how things going with everyone? I'll start casting as soon as I get a few other projects out of the way.

                        Dave Patterson
                        odd_kins@...
                        http://home.comcast.net/~oddkins/foundry_home.html

                        --- On Sat, 7/10/10, michael.a.porter@... <michael.a.porter@...> wrote:


                        From: michael.a.porter@... <michael.a.porter@...>
                        Subject: Re: [hobbicast] No Joy 3D
                        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Saturday, July 10, 2010, 12:17 PM


                         



                        Hi Dave,
                        Missed you at the last breakfast meeting. The guys said you were busy working on you property.
                        Mikey

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: David Patterson <odd_kins@...>
                        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Sat, 10 Jul 2010 15:30:51 -0000 (UTC)
                        Subject: Re: [hobbicast] No Joy 3D

                        You need to treat it like a piece of wood all the steps need to be sanded down paint with a filling primer until thepart is smooth. I have used .stl models for patterns and they can make some nice castings. thick wall .stl models may not be solid(some liquid inside) this would need to be drained and filled with an epoxy. Or request that the model be made solid.

                        Dave Patterson
                        odd_kins@...
                        http://home.comcast.net/~oddkins/foundry_home.html

                        --- On Fri, 7/9/10, Rod <rodney_grantham@...> wrote:

                        From: Rod <rodney_grantham@...>

                        Subject: [hobbicast] No Joy 3D

                        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com

                        Date: Friday, July 9, 2010, 7:40 PM

                        My attempt as making a casting from models created on a 3D printer were unsuccessful. The folks at uPrint were kind enough to send me samples of a couple models. There is a photo plus a closeup of the models in the photo's section <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/photos/album/738747855/pic/list> under Grantham. By using the 'change zoom level' in your browser you should be able to see the little jaggies that don't release cleanly from the sand.

                        Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Guess I'll have to stick with photopolymer for the time being.

                        Rod

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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