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Re: [hobbicast] [off?] CNC Machine Running

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  • Todd
    Jeshua, nice work! I ve been working on a Gingery Lathe for about 4 months w/o nearly the progress to show for it :o). Q: What is the 3D visualization/CAD
    Message 1 of 17 , Feb 1, 2010
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      Jeshua, nice work! I've been working on a Gingery Lathe for about 4
      months w/o nearly the progress to show for it :o).

      Q: What is the 3D visualization/CAD software that you show in the first
      part of your demo?

      Q: You mention in the thread that you used pycam. Could you elaborate on
      your CAD tool chain...and how well it's working for you? I've been using
      QCad...but it's a 2D only option...though somehow they have an
      additional GCode module, too.

      Q: You mention using the Roton ballscrews/nuts for your z axis... have
      you needed a brake? I ask b/c the Roton site claims that the translation
      of force to rotation is so efficient that their devices cannot be
      counted on to self-brake.

      Q: What linear motion system are you using, and what are it's
      performance characteristics (flatness, deflection, etc.)?

      My plan is to build the Gingery series and then start on a CNC...
      probably very similar to yours. At my current rate, I should be starting
      that project in about 2-5 years :o).

      -Todd

      On 1/31/10 7:25 PM, Jeshua Lacock wrote:
      >
      > On Jan 31, 2010, at 7:28 PM, Ron Thompson wrote:
      >
      >> Do you have dual belts on the x axis? I used two and two steppers
      >> slaved
      >> together, no racking of the y axis.
      >
      > No - I have two belts on the Y, but only one belt on the X.
      >
      > Interesting thought - might be worth trying.
      >
      >> I use mach3 to drive the steppers, so slaving was easy.
      >
      >
      > Cool. For my dual belts on the Y, I am using one servo (2 horsepower
      > geared down 2:1!) connected to a drive shaft that drives both belts.
      >
      > Makes for a cost effective solution - one servo, one controller, one
      > power supply....
      >
      >
      > Best,
      >
      > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
      > <http://OpenOSX.com>
      > phone: 208.462.4171
      >
      >
    • Ron Thompson
      In 2-5 years you can buy a cnc router at Wal-mart. ... -- Ron Thompson Riding my 07 XL883C Sportster On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the
      Message 2 of 17 , Feb 1, 2010
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        In 2-5 years you can buy a cnc router at Wal-mart.

        On 2/1/2010 10:39 AM, Todd wrote:
        >
        >
        > Jeshua, nice work! I've been working on a Gingery Lathe for about 4
        > months w/o nearly the progress to show for it :o).
        >
        > Q: What is the 3D visualization/CAD software that you show in the first
        > part of your demo?
        >
        > Q: You mention in the thread that you used pycam. Could you elaborate on
        > your CAD tool chain...and how well it's working for you? I've been using
        > QCad...but it's a 2D only option...though somehow they have an
        > additional GCode module, too.
        >
        > Q: You mention using the Roton ballscrews/nuts for your z axis... have
        > you needed a brake? I ask b/c the Roton site claims that the translation
        > of force to rotation is so efficient that their devices cannot be
        > counted on to self-brake.
        >
        > Q: What linear motion system are you using, and what are it's
        > performance characteristics (flatness, deflection, etc.)?
        >
        > My plan is to build the Gingery series and then start on a CNC...
        > probably very similar to yours. At my current rate, I should be starting
        > that project in about 2-5 years :o).
        >
        > -Todd
        >
        > On 1/31/10 7:25 PM, Jeshua Lacock wrote:
        > >
        > > On Jan 31, 2010, at 7:28 PM, Ron Thompson wrote:
        > >
        > >> Do you have dual belts on the x axis? I used two and two steppers
        > >> slaved
        > >> together, no racking of the y axis.
        > >
        > > No - I have two belts on the Y, but only one belt on the X.
        > >
        > > Interesting thought - might be worth trying.
        > >
        > >> I use mach3 to drive the steppers, so slaving was easy.
        > >
        > >
        > > Cool. For my dual belts on the Y, I am using one servo (2 horsepower
        > > geared down 2:1!) connected to a drive shaft that drives both belts.
        > >
        > > Makes for a cost effective solution - one servo, one controller, one
        > > power supply....
        > >
        > >
        > > Best,
        > >
        > > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
        > > <http://OpenOSX.com <http://OpenOSX.com>>
        > > phone: 208.462.4171
        > >
        > >
        >
        >


        --


        Ron Thompson Riding my '07 XL883C Sportster
        On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space
        Center, USA

        http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
        http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

        Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
        http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/

        Add yourself to the member map here:
        http://www.frappr.com/castinghobby

        Want to have some fun? The next time you're at McDonald's, wait until
        the kid has your change ready and then say "Wait, I've got the two cents."
        -Ron Thompson
      • Joseph Feldmann
        ... ????????????? Yvan Wolvesbane Pacifist ...with occasional lapses. ________________________________ [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 17 , Feb 1, 2010
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          >Ron Thompson sent: In 2-5 years you can buy a cnc router at Wal-mart.

          ?????????????

          Yvan Wolvesbane
          Pacifist ...with occasional lapses.




          ________________________________




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • postello@msu.edu
           You can get a few pieces run at 100kgarages, too, if you don t have enough work to kepp your own CNC busy. -- ... [Non-text portions of this message have
          Message 4 of 17 , Feb 1, 2010
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             You can get a few pieces run at 100kgarages, too, if you don't have enough work to kepp your own CNC busy.

            --
            "All that is artificial, is also natural." René Descartes 1644 Quoting Joseph Feldmann <yvanwolvesbane222@...>:

            >> Ron Thompson sent: In 2-5 years you can buy a cnc router at Wal-mart.
            >
            > ?????????????
            >
            >  Yvan Wolvesbane
            > Pacifist  ...with occasional lapses.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jeshua Lacock
            ... Sounds like a great project. One of the first things I plan to do with my CNC machine is make the patterns I need to make a turntable and a lathe
            Message 5 of 17 , Feb 1, 2010
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              On Feb 1, 2010, at 8:39 AM, Todd wrote:

              > Jeshua, nice work! I've been working on a Gingery Lathe for about 4
              > months w/o nearly the progress to show for it :o).

              Sounds like a great project. One of the first things I plan to do with
              my CNC machine is make the patterns I need to make a turntable and a
              lathe "attachment" for the CNC machine...

              > Q: What is the 3D visualization/CAD software that you show in the
              > first
              > part of your demo?

              It is a free application called Meshlab. It is not so much for
              modeling as it is a great 3D utility.

              I used it to reduce the complexity of the model that the CNC machine
              made and saved the model as a DXF as was required by Pycam.

              > Q: You mention in the thread that you used pycam. Could you
              > elaborate on
              > your CAD tool chain...and how well it's working for you? I've been
              > using
              > QCad...but it's a 2D only option...though somehow they have an
              > additional GCode module, too.

              I have been evaluating Vectorworks. It will create true surfaces or
              solids that can be used by high-end CAM software.

              The bonus for me is that it runs natively on the Mac.

              But for my first run, I just download a free model, reduced the
              complexity in Meshlab (on my Mac) and saved as a DXF, then copied to
              my Linux machine, opened the DXF in Pycam, saved the G-Code, and then
              opened in the EMC machine controller software.

              The cool thing is it was all done just between my Mac and my Linux
              machine from which I can control on my Mac. So I feel right at home.

              > Q: You mention using the Roton ballscrews/nuts for your z axis... have
              > you needed a brake? I ask b/c the Roton site claims that the
              > translation
              > of force to rotation is so efficient that their devices cannot be
              > counted on to self-brake.

              It is so efficient that when I got the ballscrew, just the weight of
              the ballnut would make it roll down the screw by gravity alone. It got
              up to a pretty healthy RPM too. So I wasn't sure if I would still need
              a break. I thought if nothing else, it would be much slower than a
              straight drop.

              But once I mounted it on my machine, the TDK rails with such a tight
              tolerance was just enough friction that it does not require a break. I
              think if it was using skate bearings instead of TDK bearings, it would
              like still need a break. Or if my router was any heavier....

              > Q: What linear motion system are you using, and what are it's
              > performance characteristics (flatness, deflection, etc.)?

              I am using a different linear system for each axis.

              I would have liked to use TDK everywhere - but the get very spendy
              when you need them 5 feet long.

              For my big Y carriage I am using VXB bearings:

              http://www.vxb.com/page/bearings/PROD/20mmLinearMotionSystems/Kit8389

              For my X, I am using a skate bearing carriage that I got from:

              http://www.cncrouterparts.com/product_info.php?cPath=21&products_id=33

              It just used a 1/4" steel plate for the guide. If I were to do it
              again, I would use these for the Y as well. Very nice system, low
              cost, cheap and easy to replace the bearings, and the bearings are
              sealed. The VXB system, the bearings are essentially open.

              And for the Z, I picked up some used TDK linear bearings on eBay.

              As for deflection, all of the rails are mounted on very rigid
              surfaces, so I think that would be very minimal.

              > My plan is to build the Gingery series and then start on a CNC...
              > probably very similar to yours. At my current rate, I should be
              > starting
              > that project in about 2-5 years :o).


              Good luck! Sounds fun.


              Best,

              Jeshua Lacock, Owner
              <http://OpenOSX.com>
              phone: 208.462.4171
            • Lance
              Group, I have an electric kiln about 15 diam x ~ 15 tall. It is sectional with fire brick. Two sections are wired. One wire is broken, the other
              Message 6 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                Group,

                I have an electric kiln about
                15" diam <hex> x ~ 15" tall.
                It is sectional with fire brick.
                Two sections are wired. One wire is
                broken, the other measures ~ 9 Ohms.

                I have two old never used wires for the kiln.
                They each read ~ 4 ohm.

                In addition, I have a 7.5" circular electric burner
                from a stove which has a high and a low
                spiral. One is 44 ohm, the other 70 ohm.

                I have several 110 and 220V outlets in the shop.

                I could connect new wires in series for 220V use or
                individually for separate 110V lines.
                I could create a hollow in the hinged top
                for the stove burner
                and wire it for two step 220V operation.

                The kiln is rated at 2100F

                I plan to use the kiln for glass slump / fuse
                small batch Al melt and steel anneal.

                What is your recommendations
                for connecting the new heaters?

                Thanks
                lance
                ++++
              • wheezer
                Group, I have an electric kiln about 15 diam x ~ 15 tall. It is sectional with fire brick. Two sections are wired. One wire is broken, the other
                Message 7 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                  Group,

                  I have an electric kiln about
                  15" diam <hex> x ~ 15" tall.
                  It is sectional with fire brick.
                  Two sections are wired. One wire is
                  broken, the other measures ~ 9 Ohms.

                  I have two old never used wires for the kiln.
                  They each read ~ 4 ohm.

                  In addition, I have a 7.5" circular electric burner
                  from a stove which has a high and a low
                  spiral. One is 44 ohm, the other 70 ohm.

                  I have several 110 and 220V outlets in the shop.

                  I could connect new wires in series for 220V use or
                  individually for separate 110V lines.
                  I could create a hollow in the hinged top
                  for the stove burner
                  and wire it for two step 220V operation.

                  The kiln is rated at 2100F

                  I plan to use the kiln for glass slump / fuse
                  small batch Al melt and steel anneal.

                  What is your recommendations
                  for connecting the new heaters?

                  Thanks
                  lance
                  ++++
                • Lance
                  Group, I have an electric kiln about 15 diam x ~ 15 tall. It is sectional with fire brick. Two sections are wired. One wire is broken, the other
                  Message 8 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                    Group,

                    I have an electric kiln about
                    15" diam <hex> x ~ 15" tall.
                    It is sectional with fire brick.
                    Two sections are wired. One wire is
                    broken, the other measures ~ 9 Ohms.

                    I have two old never used wires for the kiln.
                    They each read ~ 4 ohm.

                    In addition, I have a 7.5" circular electric burner
                    from a stove which has a high and a low
                    spiral. One is 44 ohm, the other 70 ohm.

                    I have several 110 and 220V outlets in the shop.

                    I could connect new wires in series for 220V use or
                    individually for separate 110V lines.
                    I could create a hollow in the hinged top
                    for the stove burner
                    and wire it for two step 220V operation.

                    The kiln is rated at 2100F

                    I plan to use the kiln for glass slump / fuse
                    small batch Al melt and steel anneal.

                    What is your recommendations
                    for connecting the new heaters?

                    Thanks
                    lance
                    ++++
                  • Stone Tool
                    4 ohms is going to give you roughly a 30 amp draw... or 3600 watts. That s a sizeable draw for 120 volts. I personally would series the wires and run it on
                    Message 9 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                      4 ohms is going to give you roughly a 30 amp draw... or 3600 watts.
                      That's a sizeable draw for 120 volts. I personally would series the
                      wires and run it on 220.... There are few 120V outlets that are going to
                      handle 30 amps.... but 30 amps total on a series system will easily be
                      carried by most 220 outlets.

                      Howard

                      On 02/07/2010 01:10 PM, Lance wrote:
                      > Group,
                      >
                      > I have an electric kiln about
                      > 15" diam <hex> x ~ 15" tall.
                      > It is sectional with fire brick.
                      > Two sections are wired. One wire is
                      > broken, the other measures ~ 9 Ohms.
                      >
                      > I have two old never used wires for the kiln.
                      > They each read ~ 4 ohm.
                      >
                      > In addition, I have a 7.5" circular electric burner
                      > from a stove which has a high and a low
                      > spiral. One is 44 ohm, the other 70 ohm.
                      >
                      > I have several 110 and 220V outlets in the shop.
                      >
                      > I could connect new wires in series for 220V use or
                      > individually for separate 110V lines.
                      > I could create a hollow in the hinged top
                      > for the stove burner
                      > and wire it for two step 220V operation.
                      >
                      > The kiln is rated at 2100F
                      >
                      > I plan to use the kiln for glass slump / fuse
                      > small batch Al melt and steel anneal.
                      >
                      > What is your recommendations
                      > for connecting the new heaters?
                      >
                      > Thanks
                      > lance
                      > ++++
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                      > this list does not accept attachments.
                      >
                      > Files area and list services are at:
                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                      >
                      > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                      > check out these two affiliated sites:
                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                      >
                      > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                      > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                      >
                      > List Owner:
                      > owly@...
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Rick Sparber
                      As the element heats up, the resistance should rise. If possible, I suggest you measure the voltage across one and the current through it at the same time to
                      Message 10 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                        As the element heats up, the resistance should rise. If possible, I suggest
                        you measure the voltage across one and the current through it at the same
                        time to determine the draw.

                        Rick

                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                        Of Stone Tool
                        Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2010 4:37 PM
                        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [hobbicast] re-wiring a kiln

                        4 ohms is going to give you roughly a 30 amp draw... or 3600 watts.
                        That's a sizeable draw for 120 volts. I personally would series the
                        wires and run it on 220.... There are few 120V outlets that are going to
                        handle 30 amps.... but 30 amps total on a series system will easily be
                        carried by most 220 outlets.

                        Howard

                        On 02/07/2010 01:10 PM, Lance wrote:
                        > Group,
                        >
                        > I have an electric kiln about
                        > 15" diam <hex> x ~ 15" tall.
                        > It is sectional with fire brick.
                        > Two sections are wired. One wire is
                        > broken, the other measures ~ 9 Ohms.
                        >
                        > I have two old never used wires for the kiln.
                        > They each read ~ 4 ohm.
                        >
                        > In addition, I have a 7.5" circular electric burner
                        > from a stove which has a high and a low
                        > spiral. One is 44 ohm, the other 70 ohm.
                        >
                        > I have several 110 and 220V outlets in the shop.
                        >
                        > I could connect new wires in series for 220V use or
                        > individually for separate 110V lines.
                        > I could create a hollow in the hinged top
                        > for the stove burner
                        > and wire it for two step 220V operation.
                        >
                        > The kiln is rated at 2100F
                        >
                        > I plan to use the kiln for glass slump / fuse
                        > small batch Al melt and steel anneal.
                        >
                        > What is your recommendations
                        > for connecting the new heaters?
                        >
                        > Thanks
                        > lance
                        > ++++
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                        > this list does not accept attachments.
                        >
                        > Files area and list services are at:
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                        >
                        > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                        > check out these two affiliated sites:
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                        >
                        > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                        > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                        >
                        > List Owner:
                        > owly@...
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        ------------------------------------

                        For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                        this list does not accept attachments.

                        Files area and list services are at:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast

                        For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                        check out these two affiliated sites:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1

                        Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                        http://budgetcastingsupply.com/

                        List Owner:
                        owly@...

                        Yahoo! Groups Links
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