Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Oil fired furnace etc.

Expand Messages
  • joebainum
    Sorry to everyone, I should have introduced myself. I ve been lurking for a while and never have really posted before. I tried to post at one point a few
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 24, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Sorry to everyone, I should have introduced myself. I've been lurking for a while and never have really posted before. I tried to post at one point a few months ago but I couldn't reply through my email server and didn't get around to logging in to yahoo. I have'nt seen much I'm very interested in until the discussion turned toward casting cylinder heads and oil fired furnaces. I have done some sand casting and mostly ingot making and casting odd sized billets for a good friend of mine who likes to play around with CNC stuff. I don't have a lot of experience with foundry work. I, like many of you it seems, caught this bug when I was in high school and we did some aluminum casting in shop class and I've been intrigue since then. I'm 35 now. My system consists of a wood and oil fired fired furnace inspired by the Dave Gingery Charcoal Foundry book. I scaled it up from the five gallon tin pale to a 55 gallon drum cut in half. I made my own fire brick and cast my own lid just as Gingery instructs in his book. I also put my air blast inlet in at an angle so the fire would swirl around my melting pot instead of tumbling under and around it. The jury's still out on that one as to whether or not it was a good idea. It probably doesn't really matter. At any rate, I use a heavy piece of six in pipe with an end welded to it for a pot and I melt only aluminum. I suppose it could handle brass because gingery talks about melting brass in a cofee can in his book and using vise grips to carefully lift it out. Sounds like a very bad idea to me. I manually lift my furnace lid off and use a pair of homemade tongs to lift out my pot. The pot has two one inch X 3/8 bolts welded at the top on the sides so I don't have to squeeze very tightly with the tongs. I have a one man ladle that is homemade also and I actually have some professional flasks that are quite large and work very well as they should. My sand is homemade per the recipe Gingery gives in his book and I would love to get my hands on some oil based sand or a recipe for it. Any help with the oil fired furnace or oil based sand will be greatly appreciated and I doubt I'm much help to anyone but I'm willing to offer the same to anyone on here. I'm in NW Missouri if any of you are nearby.

      Joe
    • Dave
      Welcome Joe, Here is a link to a site that talks about k-bond sand. This is an oil bonded sand that was developed to be more friendly to the environment I
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 26, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Welcome Joe,

        Here is a link to a site that talks about k-bond sand. This is an oil bonded sand that was developed to be more friendly to the environment I believe.
        http://www.foundry.ray-vin.com/k-bond/k-bond.htm

        http://BudgetCastingsupply.com carries Petro-bond...the more well known and used oil bonded sand. They used to carry the catalyst so that you could just add your own sand but I don't see that they still do that...probably because people didn't realize that you really need a muller to mix it up right. Remember that their prices do include shipping!

        Regular water bonded green sand is fine for almost anything. Take a look at this link:
        http://www.foundry101.com/racert2.htm
        I am not sure if this is using green sand or oil bonded, but I am sure it was done in the past using green sand.



        I have heard some people say that the strength of green sand is better than the oil bonded sands...and I think I agree...the oil bonded sand seems to crumble easily to me.

        The benefits of oil bonded... It doesn't have to be "fiddled" with to make sure the water content is exactly right...You can mold it and let the mold sit for a long time before pouring. It generates less steam...so you need less venting.

        Dave D
        http://metalshop.homestead.com
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.