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large aluminum castings

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  • Tim
    I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 16, 2010
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      I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
      castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
      larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
      but would probably use waste oil.

      Tim
    • Stinson_Voyager
      Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I ve done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
      Message 2 of 17 , Jan 17, 2010
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        Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
        When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
        On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.



        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@...> wrote:
        >
        > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
        > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
        > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
        > but would probably use waste oil.
        >
        > Tim
        >
      • Tim
        I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task, which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 17, 2010
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          I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
          which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
          an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
          in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
          lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
          than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
          risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
          lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.

          I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
          there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
          I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
          be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
          an old South Bend metal lathe.

          Tim

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@...> wrote:
          >
          > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
          > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
          > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
          > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
          > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
          > > but would probably use waste oil.
          > >
          > > Tim
          > >
          >
        • dlcranston
          Tim You might keep an eye on the Home Metal Shop Club of Houston website. www.homemetalshopclub.org We (I) put on metal casting workshops once or twice a
          Message 4 of 17 , Jan 18, 2010
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            Tim
            You might keep an eye on the Home Metal Shop Club of Houston
            website. www.homemetalshopclub.org We (I) put on metal casting workshops
            once or twice a year at a location northwest of Houston. We will probably
            have one this spring. Usually we use Petrobond as the sand. Metals are ZA
            (my favorite) or aluminum, although the techniques are the same for bronze.

            Dennis in Houston


            -----Original Message-----
            From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of Tim
            Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2010 11:27 PM
            To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [hobbicast] Re: large aluminum castings

            I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
            which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
            an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
            in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
            lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
            than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
            risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
            lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.

            I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
            there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
            I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
            be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
            an old South Bend metal lathe.

            Tim

            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@...> wrote:
            >
            > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time.
            I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple
            molds.
            > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in
            man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that
            require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
            > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the
            shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
            > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
            > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
            > > but would probably use waste oil.
            > >
            > > Tim
            > >
            >




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          • Jeshua Lacock
            ... Hi Tim, I have a 100-pound crucible in one of my furnaces. I designed the entire furnace to tilt for pouring large castings. In the pictures of it running,
            Message 5 of 17 , Jan 18, 2010
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              On Jan 17, 2010, at 10:27 PM, Tim wrote:

              > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
              > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
              > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
              > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
              > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
              > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
              > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
              > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.


              Hi Tim,

              I have a 100-pound crucible in one of my furnaces.

              I designed the entire furnace to tilt for pouring large castings. In
              the pictures of it running, it is burning oil, I also have a Reil
              propane burner, and a forced air wood burner for the same furnace:

              http://openosx.com/hotspring/foundry/tilt/tilt.html

              The (reconfigured) frame was from a salvaged concrete mixer.

              I have a video of me pouring about 50-pounds total (two 25-pound
              castings) up on YouTube using my smaller hand poured steel crucible
              (used the same furnace though) at:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Q3LmR4X1Bg

              The crucible weighs about 20-25 pounds, so with 50 pounds of aluminum
              it was right around 75 pounds I had to handle. I would think it would
              not be advisable to pour much bigger by hand (solo). It was a lot more
              hot and heavy then it looks on video!

              I could have just as well poured a single 50-pound casting as two
              separate castings.

              Next time I pour something that large, I am going to pour directly
              from the comfort and safety of my tilt furnace...


              Best,

              Jeshua Lacock, Owner
              <http://OpenOSX.com>
              phone: 208.462.4171
            • vintagepowerplus
              hi tim just a thaught if you want to cast a cylinder head it might be better if you make the mould and get a foundry to cast it for you as they are not to busy
              Message 6 of 17 , Jan 18, 2010
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                hi tim
                just a thaught
                if you want to cast a cylinder head it might be better if you
                make the mould and get a foundry to cast it for you as they are not to busy nowadays
                you should get a good deal and they can advise on materials and also heat treatment a good foundry will also advise on how to make the mould i wanted some small parts for my old 1920 indian and they went out of there way to help saying if it wasnt for guys like me there would not be any old stuff on the roads any more

                i just think that after all your work with the mould and machining the casting you would be pissed if the casting was porous or had some impurities

                hope this helps

                barry



                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@...> wrote:
                >
                > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                >
                > I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
                > there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
                > I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
                > be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
                > an old South Bend metal lathe.
                >
                > Tim
                >
                > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
                > > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
                > > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
                > > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
                > > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
                > > > but would probably use waste oil.
                > > >
                > > > Tim
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • giesser@aol.com
                Texas State University in San Marcos has an excellent Metal Casting program in the Sept of Manufacturing Technology. Contact Eulogio Velasco (512) 245-3789 or
                Message 7 of 17 , Jan 18, 2010
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                  Texas State University in San Marcos has an excellent Metal Casting program in the Sept of Manufacturing Technology. Contact Eulogio Velasco (512) 245-3789 or ev15@...

                  They can pour aluminum, brass, iron and steel. Describe what you want to do and that should be able to help you.

                  There are 25 Metal Casting schools in North America that are supported by the Foundry Educational Foundation. For a list go to. www.fefinc.org/schools/accreditedSchools.php

                  Tom Cobett

                  "In Pyro Veritas"

                  T
                  Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: "vintagepowerplus" <beach.buggy@...>
                  Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 19:18:07
                  To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
                  Subject: [hobbicast] Re: large aluminum castings


                  hi tim
                  just a thaught
                  if you want to cast a cylinder head it might be better if you
                  make the mould and get a foundry to cast it for you as they are not to busy nowadays
                  you should get a good deal and they can advise on materials and also heat treatment a good foundry will also advise on how to make the mould i wanted some small parts for my old 1920 indian and they went out of there way to help saying if it wasnt for guys like me there would not be any old stuff on the roads any more

                  i just think that after all your work with the mould and machining the casting you would be pissed if the casting was porous or had some impurities

                  hope this helps

                  barry



                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                  > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                  > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                  > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                  > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                  > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                  > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                  > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                  >
                  > I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
                  > there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
                  > I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
                  > be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
                  > an old South Bend metal lathe.
                  >
                  > Tim
                  >
                  > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
                  > > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
                  > > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
                  > > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
                  > > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
                  > > > but would probably use waste oil.
                  > > >
                  > > > Tim
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Dan Brewer
                  Jeshua , You really need to get a pouring shank to get you away from the heat. A splash would have taken out the family jewels. Dan in Auburn ... [Non-text
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jan 18, 2010
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                    Jeshua , You really need to get a pouring shank to get you away from the
                    heat. A splash would have taken out the family jewels.
                    Dan in Auburn

                    On Mon, Jan 18, 2010 at 10:48 AM, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > On Jan 17, 2010, at 10:27 PM, Tim wrote:
                    >
                    > > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                    > > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                    > > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                    > > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                    > > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                    > > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                    > > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                    > > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                    >
                    > Hi Tim,
                    >
                    > I have a 100-pound crucible in one of my furnaces.
                    >
                    > I designed the entire furnace to tilt for pouring large castings. In
                    > the pictures of it running, it is burning oil, I also have a Reil
                    > propane burner, and a forced air wood burner for the same furnace:
                    >
                    > http://openosx.com/hotspring/foundry/tilt/tilt.html
                    >
                    > The (reconfigured) frame was from a salvaged concrete mixer.
                    >
                    > I have a video of me pouring about 50-pounds total (two 25-pound
                    > castings) up on YouTube using my smaller hand poured steel crucible
                    > (used the same furnace though) at:
                    >
                    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Q3LmR4X1Bg
                    >
                    > The crucible weighs about 20-25 pounds, so with 50 pounds of aluminum
                    > it was right around 75 pounds I had to handle. I would think it would
                    > not be advisable to pour much bigger by hand (solo). It was a lot more
                    > hot and heavy then it looks on video!
                    >
                    > I could have just as well poured a single 50-pound casting as two
                    > separate castings.
                    >
                    > Next time I pour something that large, I am going to pour directly
                    > from the comfort and safety of my tilt furnace...
                    >
                    > Best,
                    >
                    > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                    > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                    > phone: 208.462.4171
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Jeshua Lacock
                    ... Hi Dan, As I said, next time I attempt something this large, I will use my tilting furnace which would put me away from the heat. At any rate - the jewels
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jan 18, 2010
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                      On Jan 18, 2010, at 1:39 PM, Dan Brewer wrote:

                      > Jeshua , You really need to get a pouring shank to get you away from
                      > the
                      > heat. A splash would have taken out the family jewels.


                      Hi Dan,

                      As I said, next time I attempt something this large, I will use my
                      tilting furnace which would put me away from the heat.

                      At any rate - the jewels were well protected - I had a double-layer of
                      aluminized Kevlar and Aramid pants and bib on...


                      Best,

                      Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                      <http://OpenOSX.com>
                      phone: 208.462.4171
                    • STEVEN SQUIER
                      Jesua,   Did you use some type of foam mold in the sand?  What is causing all of the fire and black smoke in the pour in the YouTube vidoe?       Steve
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jan 18, 2010
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                        Jesua,
                          Did you use some type of foam mold in the sand?  What is causing all of the fire and black smoke in the pour in the YouTube vidoe?
                         
                         
                         
                        Steve

                        --- On Mon, 1/18/10, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:


                        From: Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...>
                        Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: large aluminum castings
                        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Monday, January 18, 2010, 12:48 PM


                         




                        On Jan 17, 2010, at 10:27 PM, Tim wrote:

                        > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                        > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                        > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                        > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                        > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                        > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                        > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                        > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.

                        Hi Tim,

                        I have a 100-pound crucible in one of my furnaces.

                        I designed the entire furnace to tilt for pouring large castings. In
                        the pictures of it running, it is burning oil, I also have a Reil
                        propane burner, and a forced air wood burner for the same furnace:

                        http://openosx. com/hotspring/ foundry/tilt/ tilt.html

                        The (reconfigured) frame was from a salvaged concrete mixer.

                        I have a video of me pouring about 50-pounds total (two 25-pound
                        castings) up on YouTube using my smaller hand poured steel crucible
                        (used the same furnace though) at:

                        http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=7Q3LmR4X1Bg

                        The crucible weighs about 20-25 pounds, so with 50 pounds of aluminum
                        it was right around 75 pounds I had to handle. I would think it would
                        not be advisable to pour much bigger by hand (solo). It was a lot more
                        hot and heavy then it looks on video!

                        I could have just as well poured a single 50-pound casting as two
                        separate castings.

                        Next time I pour something that large, I am going to pour directly
                        from the comfort and safety of my tilt furnace...

                        Best,

                        Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                        <http://OpenOSX. com>
                        phone: 208.462.4171








                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Jeshua Lacock
                        ... Indeed - it was lost foam using extruded polystyrene (the blue stuff from Home Depot). It is also the source of the flames jumping out of the mold... Best,
                        Message 11 of 17 , Jan 18, 2010
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                          On Jan 18, 2010, at 3:11 PM, STEVEN SQUIER wrote:

                          > Did you use some type of foam mold in the sand? What is causing
                          > all of the fire and black smoke in the pour in the YouTube vidoe?


                          Indeed - it was lost foam using extruded polystyrene (the blue stuff
                          from Home Depot).

                          It is also the source of the flames jumping out of the mold...


                          Best,

                          Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                          <http://OpenOSX.com>
                          phone: 208.462.4171
                        • Martin
                          Have you folks ever looked at MIFCO? They are VERY FRIENDLY and easy to deal with. http://www.mifco.com/cpmelter.htm God Bless, Martin
                          Message 12 of 17 , Jan 19, 2010
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                            Have you folks ever looked at MIFCO?

                            They are VERY FRIENDLY and easy to deal with.
                            http://www.mifco.com/cpmelter.htm
                            God Bless,
                            Martin

                            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                            > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                            > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                            > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                            > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                            > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                            > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                            > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                            >
                            > I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
                            > there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
                            > I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
                            > be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
                            > an old South Bend metal lathe.
                            >
                            > Tim
                            >
                            > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
                            > > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
                            > > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
                            > > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
                            > > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
                            > > > but would probably use waste oil.
                            > > >
                            > > > Tim
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • Stinson_Voyager
                            I had a Mifco for awhile, got it from a school that closed it s industrial arts program. They re rather expensive. Ultimately though, I went back to a furnace
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jan 23, 2010
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                              I had a Mifco for awhile, got it from a school that closed it's industrial arts program. They're rather expensive.
                              Ultimately though, I went back to a furnace design that my grandfather used in his foundry biz. Built in the ground using a metal drum for a form and wedge-shaped firebrick to form the sides. Diesel fired from a tank about 5 feet above ground and used a surplus industrial blower. I first used a speed controller on the blower but found it was easier to control the furnace using a flapper-diverter and let the blower run at constant speed.
                              The furnace requies NO special burner! and runs on any flammable oil. I have run it sucessfully on Diesel #2, "Red Diesel", fryer oil waste (filtered to remove the onion ring chunks), and Jet-A. I can get all but the diesel for free so it's really cheap to run but if I cant get fuel and need to melt, I can always run down to the gas station.
                              The fuel is controlled with an ordinary petcock from home depot to control flow and fed tangentially to a tube situated in the airflow. Runs fantastic, easily melts bronze, makes a low-freq pleasant rumble when running.
                              It's no where near as unsightly when not in use and relatively inexpensive to make.
                              Downsides: since it's in the ground you're standing over it when it's open so if the pot is very heavy or if you're melting brass/bronze you really need help to lift the pot. I have a small wheeled "A-Frame" I made with a chain hoist that I use when I'm alone.
                              And, it's very hard to take with you if you move :)

                              There's a benefit to using oil that I rarely see anyone mention. The gases that result in oil burning act as a barrier over the metal that prevent gasses from becoming entrained in the melt. Often you need NO degassing and there is very little dross.


                              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Martin" <mrgutzmer@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Have you folks ever looked at MIFCO?
                              >
                              > They are VERY FRIENDLY and easy to deal with.
                              > http://www.mifco.com/cpmelter.htm
                              > God Bless,
                              > Martin
                              >
                              > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                              > > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                              > > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                              > > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                              > > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                              > > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                              > > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                              > > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                              > >
                              > > I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
                              > > there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
                              > > I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
                              > > be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
                              > > an old South Bend metal lathe.
                              > >
                              > > Tim
                              > >
                              > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
                              > > > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
                              > > > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
                              > > > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
                              > > > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
                              > > > > but would probably use waste oil.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Tim
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • Dave
                              I would love to see some pictures...I could put them on my site too if you want to send them to me. Dave D http://metalshop.homestead.com
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jan 23, 2010
                              • 0 Attachment
                                I would love to see some pictures...I could put them on my site too if you want to send them to me.

                                Dave D
                                http://metalshop.homestead.com


                                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I had a Mifco for awhile, got it from a school that closed it's industrial arts program. They're rather expensive.
                                > Ultimately though, I went back to a furnace design that my grandfather used in his foundry biz. Built in the ground using a metal drum for a form and wedge-shaped firebrick to form the sides. Diesel fired from a tank about 5 feet above ground and used a surplus industrial blower. I first used a speed controller on the blower but found it was easier to control the furnace using a flapper-diverter and let the blower run at constant speed.
                                > The furnace requies NO special burner! and runs on any flammable oil. I have run it sucessfully on Diesel #2, "Red Diesel", fryer oil waste (filtered to remove the onion ring chunks), and Jet-A. I can get all but the diesel for free so it's really cheap to run but if I cant get fuel and need to melt, I can always run down to the gas station.
                                > The fuel is controlled with an ordinary petcock from home depot to control flow and fed tangentially to a tube situated in the airflow. Runs fantastic, easily melts bronze, makes a low-freq pleasant rumble when running.
                                > It's no where near as unsightly when not in use and relatively inexpensive to make.
                                > Downsides: since it's in the ground you're standing over it when it's open so if the pot is very heavy or if you're melting brass/bronze you really need help to lift the pot. I have a small wheeled "A-Frame" I made with a chain hoist that I use when I'm alone.
                                > And, it's very hard to take with you if you move :)
                                >
                                > There's a benefit to using oil that I rarely see anyone mention. The gases that result in oil burning act as a barrier over the metal that prevent gasses from becoming entrained in the melt. Often you need NO degassing and there is very little dross.
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Martin" <mrgutzmer@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Have you folks ever looked at MIFCO?
                                > >
                                > > They are VERY FRIENDLY and easy to deal with.
                                > > http://www.mifco.com/cpmelter.htm
                                > > God Bless,
                                > > Martin
                                > >
                                > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                                > > > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                                > > > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                                > > > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                                > > > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                                > > > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                                > > > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                                > > > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                                > > >
                                > > > I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
                                > > > there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
                                > > > I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
                                > > > be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
                                > > > an old South Bend metal lathe.
                                > > >
                                > > > Tim
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
                                > > > > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
                                > > > > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
                                > > > > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
                                > > > > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
                                > > > > > but would probably use waste oil.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Tim
                                > > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • joebainum
                                If it s not too much trouble, I would love to see some kind of drawing or even more detailed text info about this diesel oil powered furnace. I ve had similar
                                Message 15 of 17 , Jan 24, 2010
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  If it's not too much trouble, I would love to see some kind of drawing or even more detailed text info about this diesel oil powered furnace. I've had similar results with used motor oil drizzled over carefully prepared oak firewood and charcoal. I've heard solid and liquid fuels can help with fluxing and my aluminum looks good when it melts. I've also been told a very rich mixture or an ' oxygen hungry fire' can act as a shield or flux for your melt so I always adjust my airflow to have a nice deep orange red flame coming out of the top of my furnace. (Any time I look at electric furnaces I have to wonder if this means an electric funace would need lots of flux because there is really no fire going on and oxygen would be very present.) If it won't do this, it means I'm about out of fuel. I've had to restock/ refuel my furnace with wood in the middle of a melt before and I hate having to do this. I know where I can get plenty of used motor oil and old diesel and fuel oil so this would be a good way for me to power a furnace.



                                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I had a Mifco for awhile, got it from a school that closed it's industrial arts program. They're rather expensive.
                                  > Ultimately though, I went back to a furnace design that my grandfather used in his foundry biz. Built in the ground using a metal drum for a form and wedge-shaped firebrick to form the sides. Diesel fired from a tank about 5 feet above ground and used a surplus industrial blower. I first used a speed controller on the blower but found it was easier to control the furnace using a flapper-diverter and let the blower run at constant speed.
                                  > The furnace requies NO special burner! and runs on any flammable oil. I have run it sucessfully on Diesel #2, "Red Diesel", fryer oil waste (filtered to remove the onion ring chunks), and Jet-A. I can get all but the diesel for free so it's really cheap to run but if I cant get fuel and need to melt, I can always run down to the gas station.
                                  > The fuel is controlled with an ordinary petcock from home depot to control flow and fed tangentially to a tube situated in the airflow. Runs fantastic, easily melts bronze, makes a low-freq pleasant rumble when running.
                                  > It's no where near as unsightly when not in use and relatively inexpensive to make.
                                  > Downsides: since it's in the ground you're standing over it when it's open so if the pot is very heavy or if you're melting brass/bronze you really need help to lift the pot. I have a small wheeled "A-Frame" I made with a chain hoist that I use when I'm alone.
                                  > And, it's very hard to take with you if you move :)
                                  >
                                  > There's a benefit to using oil that I rarely see anyone mention. The gases that result in oil burning act as a barrier over the metal that prevent gasses from becoming entrained in the melt. Often you need NO degassing and there is very little dross.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Martin" <mrgutzmer@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Have you folks ever looked at MIFCO?
                                  > >
                                  > > They are VERY FRIENDLY and easy to deal with.
                                  > > http://www.mifco.com/cpmelter.htm
                                  > > God Bless,
                                  > > Martin
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                                  > > > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                                  > > > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                                  > > > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                                  > > > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                                  > > > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                                  > > > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                                  > > > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
                                  > > > there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
                                  > > > I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
                                  > > > be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
                                  > > > an old South Bend metal lathe.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Tim
                                  > > >
                                  > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
                                  > > > > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
                                  > > > > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
                                  > > > > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
                                  > > > > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
                                  > > > > > but would probably use waste oil.
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > Tim
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • warren hughes
                                  I would love to see plans , pictures anything further would be appreciated. Warren Hughes ... From: joebainum Subject: [hobbicast] Re:
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Jan 25, 2010
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    I would love to see plans , pictures anything further would be appreciated. Warren Hughes

                                    --- On Sun, 1/24/10, joebainum <joebainum@...> wrote:


                                    From: joebainum <joebainum@...>
                                    Subject: [hobbicast] Re: large aluminum castings - Mifco Furnace
                                    To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Sunday, January 24, 2010, 9:54 AM


                                     



                                    If it's not too much trouble, I would love to see some kind of drawing or even more detailed text info about this diesel oil powered furnace. I've had similar results with used motor oil drizzled over carefully prepared oak firewood and charcoal. I've heard solid and liquid fuels can help with fluxing and my aluminum looks good when it melts. I've also been told a very rich mixture or an ' oxygen hungry fire' can act as a shield or flux for your melt so I always adjust my airflow to have a nice deep orange red flame coming out of the top of my furnace. (Any time I look at electric furnaces I have to wonder if this means an electric funace would need lots of flux because there is really no fire going on and oxygen would be very present.) If it won't do this, it means I'm about out of fuel. I've had to restock/ refuel my furnace with wood in the middle of a melt before and I hate having to do this. I know where I can get plenty of used motor oil and old
                                    diesel and fuel oil so this would be a good way for me to power a furnace.

                                    --- In hobbicast@yahoogrou ps.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@.. .> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I had a Mifco for awhile, got it from a school that closed it's industrial arts program. They're rather expensive.
                                    > Ultimately though, I went back to a furnace design that my grandfather used in his foundry biz. Built in the ground using a metal drum for a form and wedge-shaped firebrick to form the sides. Diesel fired from a tank about 5 feet above ground and used a surplus industrial blower. I first used a speed controller on the blower but found it was easier to control the furnace using a flapper-diverter and let the blower run at constant speed.
                                    > The furnace requies NO special burner! and runs on any flammable oil. I have run it sucessfully on Diesel #2, "Red Diesel", fryer oil waste (filtered to remove the onion ring chunks), and Jet-A. I can get all but the diesel for free so it's really cheap to run but if I cant get fuel and need to melt, I can always run down to the gas station.
                                    > The fuel is controlled with an ordinary petcock from home depot to control flow and fed tangentially to a tube situated in the airflow. Runs fantastic, easily melts bronze, makes a low-freq pleasant rumble when running.
                                    > It's no where near as unsightly when not in use and relatively inexpensive to make.
                                    > Downsides: since it's in the ground you're standing over it when it's open so if the pot is very heavy or if you're melting brass/bronze you really need help to lift the pot. I have a small wheeled "A-Frame" I made with a chain hoist that I use when I'm alone.
                                    > And, it's very hard to take with you if you move :)
                                    >
                                    > There's a benefit to using oil that I rarely see anyone mention. The gases that result in oil burning act as a barrier over the metal that prevent gasses from becoming entrained in the melt. Often you need NO degassing and there is very little dross.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In hobbicast@yahoogrou ps.com, "Martin" <mrgutzmer@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Have you folks ever looked at MIFCO?
                                    > >
                                    > > They are VERY FRIENDLY and easy to deal with.
                                    > > http://www.mifco com/cpmelter. htm
                                    > > God Bless,
                                    > > Martin
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogrou ps.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                                    > > > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                                    > > > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                                    > > > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                                    > > > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                                    > > > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                                    > > > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                                    > > > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
                                    > > > there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
                                    > > > I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
                                    > > > be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
                                    > > > an old South Bend metal lathe.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Tim
                                    > > >
                                    > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogrou ps.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
                                    > > > > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
                                    > > > > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogrou ps.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
                                    > > > > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
                                    > > > > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
                                    > > > > > but would probably use waste oil.
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > Tim
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >








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                                  • Stinson_Voyager
                                    The furnace is hard to photograph because all you really see is a hole in the ground :) I ll make up some sketches though. I ll be going to the Dominican
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Jan 26, 2010
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      The furnace is hard to photograph because all you really see is a hole in the ground :) I'll make up some sketches though. I'll be going to the Dominican Republic to help with Haiti relief for a week or two so please be patient.
                                      I've never tried used motor oil, I'm convinced it's too thick for this kind of furnace. Fuels like Diesel, JetA, vegetable oil, etc.. are thin enough to flow freely using gravity from a tank above ground 5-6 feet. During the winter we used to add a little denatured alcohol to thin out the oil a little. Nothing special about using alcohol, it was just a solvent we had in stock as we used it in the machine shop. Oh, sure, you ould add pumps and atomizers and stuff but that just increases the complexity and isnt necessary if you stick to less-viscous fuels.
                                      In my grandfathers shop we used diesel almost exclusively only because in those days it was pretty cheap and we could order a truck to deliver. Now I use JetA and Veg oil only because I can get it for free - I've used diesel when I needed to. Switching back and forth is no big deal and mixing it is fine - I just dump in whatever I can get my hands on, you just have to tweak the flow a little bit. The neighbors like it best when I use oil from fast food fryers, makes the neighborhood smell interesting. Free fryer oil is getting hard to get around here. Between the California waste regulations and increased demand for use a fuel most of the chain fast food places now keep the old oil locked up and *sell* it to reclaimers that are licensed to collect haz waste.
                                      It's funny how a guy who complains about the hassle of having to deal with waste oil will suddenly consider it a valuable commodity the moment you offer to take it off his hands :)
                                      My father and I built a Gingery-style natural gas furnace a few years ago that works really well, it will hold a #30 pot but it's a little tight, we use a #20 or #16 most of the time. I added an oil feed to it so we can use oil when it's available. You dont have to remove the gas fittings. We've tried running it on both at the same time - it works but it's a bit of trouble to get the fuels balanced. Dad likes to start with gas and run just a couple of minutes to get the furnace hot, then switch to oil. That works pretty good.
                                      All I did was put a 1/4" copper tube in the blower air chute situated so the end of the tube was concentric with the air chute and even with the end. It helps if you have a multi-turn valve to control the oil flow but if you're using a less-expensive valve you can smash the end of the tube into a fan shape to restrict the flow a little - trial and error will find the right amount. The height of the supply tank makes a difference too - higher = more pressure = more flow. Since the gas furnace is above ground and the tank is maybe 6 ft high, there's only 5 feet or so drop vs the 8 feet for my in-ground furnace.
                                      Lighting an oil furnace can be a challenge (I guess lighting any furnace has it's challenges). Oils are hard to light - just try throwing a match in puddle of diesel. To light mine, I soak newspaper or cardboard in oil, then light it with a BBQ lighter, match, torch, whatever. I put that in the furnace and turn on the oil flow slowly to get a little puddle going, then begin to add air. Once that's stable it's a matter of gradually increasing both the oil flow and air until it's running hot enough for you. Each furnace is a little different but fussing with the settings a little and after a few melts you'll learn the sweet-spot.
                                      Now if the furnace is hot - that's a whole different set of challenges. If it's really hot, chances are it will re-light easily by just turning on the oil. If it's been off for a few minutes and started to cool, the oil may "steam" - producing what looks like a LOT of blue-white "smoke". It's not smoke, it's vaporized fuel and once it lights-off it can launch furnace lids like a rocket! In those situations I'll put more fuel-wet paper in first and re-light the furnace with the lid off.. BE CAREFUL
                                      I'm a firm believer that using oil makes it posible to make high-quality gas-entrained-free castings much easier than natural gas or propane. Personally, I would never have an electric furnace. I grew up in a foundry that used oil furnaces exclusively, we never used any anti or degassing treatments and as long as we didnt remelt sprues we didnt have to use flux when melting aluminum. Just a little skimming was all that was ever necessary.


                                      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "joebainum" <joebainum@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > If it's not too much trouble, I would love to see some kind of drawing or even more detailed text info about this diesel oil powered furnace. I've had similar results with used motor oil drizzled over carefully prepared oak firewood and charcoal. I've heard solid and liquid fuels can help with fluxing and my aluminum looks good when it melts. I've also been told a very rich mixture or an ' oxygen hungry fire' can act as a shield or flux for your melt so I always adjust my airflow to have a nice deep orange red flame coming out of the top of my furnace. (Any time I look at electric furnaces I have to wonder if this means an electric funace would need lots of flux because there is really no fire going on and oxygen would be very present.) If it won't do this, it means I'm about out of fuel. I've had to restock/ refuel my furnace with wood in the middle of a melt before and I hate having to do this. I know where I can get plenty of used motor oil and old diesel and fuel oil so this would be a good way for me to power a furnace.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > I had a Mifco for awhile, got it from a school that closed it's industrial arts program. They're rather expensive.
                                      > > Ultimately though, I went back to a furnace design that my grandfather used in his foundry biz. Built in the ground using a metal drum for a form and wedge-shaped firebrick to form the sides. Diesel fired from a tank about 5 feet above ground and used a surplus industrial blower. I first used a speed controller on the blower but found it was easier to control the furnace using a flapper-diverter and let the blower run at constant speed.
                                      > > The furnace requies NO special burner! and runs on any flammable oil. I have run it sucessfully on Diesel #2, "Red Diesel", fryer oil waste (filtered to remove the onion ring chunks), and Jet-A. I can get all but the diesel for free so it's really cheap to run but if I cant get fuel and need to melt, I can always run down to the gas station.
                                      > > The fuel is controlled with an ordinary petcock from home depot to control flow and fed tangentially to a tube situated in the airflow. Runs fantastic, easily melts bronze, makes a low-freq pleasant rumble when running.
                                      > > It's no where near as unsightly when not in use and relatively inexpensive to make.
                                      > > Downsides: since it's in the ground you're standing over it when it's open so if the pot is very heavy or if you're melting brass/bronze you really need help to lift the pot. I have a small wheeled "A-Frame" I made with a chain hoist that I use when I'm alone.
                                      > > And, it's very hard to take with you if you move :)
                                      > >
                                      > > There's a benefit to using oil that I rarely see anyone mention. The gases that result in oil burning act as a barrier over the metal that prevent gasses from becoming entrained in the melt. Often you need NO degassing and there is very little dross.
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Martin" <mrgutzmer@> wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Have you folks ever looked at MIFCO?
                                      > > >
                                      > > > They are VERY FRIENDLY and easy to deal with.
                                      > > > http://www.mifco.com/cpmelter.htm
                                      > > > God Bless,
                                      > > > Martin
                                      > > >
                                      > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > I wanted to know if a home foundry is up to the task,
                                      > > > > which seems to be the case. The holy grail for me is
                                      > > > > an automobile cylinder head that weighs about 30 pounds
                                      > > > > in aluminum. I think the water core cavities might be
                                      > > > > lost foam. Sounds as if the metal poured might be more
                                      > > > > than 40 pounds. The long casting would need some major
                                      > > > > risers, I'm told. I'm only in the dream stage, been
                                      > > > > lurking around these foundry groups for a long time.
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > I'm in the Austin-San Antonio Texas area. If anyone from
                                      > > > > there is doing some casting I'd like to observe your work.
                                      > > > > I'm sure most of what I'd eventually learn to cast would
                                      > > > > be 5 pounds or less. I don't yet have a furnace. I own
                                      > > > > an old South Bend metal lathe.
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > Tim
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stinson_Voyager" <sandiego@> wrote:
                                      > > > > >
                                      > > > > > Tim, one of my furnaces can hold a #80 pot. I use a #40 most of the time. I've done fairly large castings but most often use them to pour multiple molds.
                                      > > > > > When making large parts the challenge isnt so much melting the metal as in man-handling the mold. I've often had to make a flask out of 2 X 6's that require 2-4 people to lift the cope.
                                      > > > > > On the other hand, if the castings are thick, then you need to manage the shrink, usually with large risers that, of course, require a lot more metal.
                                      > > > > >
                                      > > > > >
                                      > > > > >
                                      > > > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <tkeith@> wrote:
                                      > > > > > >
                                      > > > > > > I searched for messages pertaining to larger aluminum
                                      > > > > > > castings, greater than 30 pounds. Is anyone here doing
                                      > > > > > > larger castings ? I have not build a furnace yet,
                                      > > > > > > but would probably use waste oil.
                                      > > > > > >
                                      > > > > > > Tim
                                      > > > > > >
                                      > > > > >
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