Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [hobbicast] Manure and Straw

Expand Messages
  • giesser@aol.com
    Manure and Straw were mixed with silica sand and clay to make a mold for making bells. Both the cope and the drag were made with sweeps, and not an actual
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 31, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Manure and Straw were mixed with silica sand and clay to make a mold for
      making bells. Both the cope and the drag were made with sweeps, and not an
      actual bell pattern. Some traditional bell foundries still do this. The
      manure aids in moisture retention. Both the manure and the chopped straw
      eliminate mold expansion problems like rat tails and scabs. Most sand molding
      foundries today use starch and wood flour or cob flour to accomplish the same
      thing. Manure and straw will work, but, are no longer widely used.

      "In Pyro Veritas"

      Tom Cobett
      Cleveland, OH


      In a message dated 10/31/2009 10:04:15 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      gary_lekvold@... writes:




      There are many variations on the cire perdue, (lost wax) process, but one
      of the more off-the-wall methods was to use a mixture of cow manure and
      straw, instead of a wax pattern. I believe this process was used to cast church
      bells, etc. I just have to ask, would this method be called, "lost crap"
      casting?

      Gary

      --- In _hobbicast@yahoogrouhobbic_ (mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com) ,
      <jbrennan3@.jb> wrote:
      >
      > At Herman some idiots tried some lost wood castings in iron..
      > 3 at the other end of the field were small chalices. I didn't see these
      pours but took the left "efforts" home with me.
      > The other was a lost Log that was too close to me and it was very
      scary!!-- didn't work either.
      > jesse
      >
      >







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • postello@msu.edu
      The replacement for this ancient bell casting method is known as No-sh*t casting   -- Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible. -Frank
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 31, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        The replacement for this ancient bell casting method is known as
        "No-sh*t casting"
         

        --
        Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible. -Frank
        Zappa, composer, musician, film director (1940-1993) Quoting
        giesser@...:

        > Manure and Straw were mixed with silica sand and clay to make a
        mold  for
        > making bells. Both the cope and the drag were made with sweeps, and
        not an
        > actual bell pattern. Some traditional bell foundries still do this.
        The
        > manure  aids in moisture retention. Both the manure and the
        chopped straw
        > eliminate mold  expansion problems like rat tails and scabs. Most
        > sand molding
        > foundries today  use starch and wood flour or cob flour to
        accomplish
        > the same
        > thing. Manure and  straw will work, but, are no longer widely
        used.
        >
        > "In Pyro Veritas"
        >
        > Tom Cobett
        > Cleveland, OH
        >
        >
        > In a message dated 10/31/2009 10:04:15 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        > gary_lekvold@... writes:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > There are many variations on the cire perdue, (lost wax) process,
        but one
        > of the more off-the-wall methods was to use a mixture of cow manure
        and
        > straw,  instead of a wax pattern. I believe this process was used
        to
        > cast church
        >   bells, etc. I just have to ask, would this method be called,
        "lost crap"
        > casting?
        >
        > Gary
        >
        > --- In _hobbicast@yahoogrouhobbic_
        (mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com) ,
        > <jbrennan3@.jb> wrote:
        >>
        >> At Herman some idiots tried  some lost wood castings in iron..
        >> 3 at the other end of the field were  small chalices. I didn't
        see these
        > pours but took the left "efforts" home with  me.
        >> The other was a lost Log that was too close to me and it was very
        > scary!!-- didn't work either.
        >> jesse
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • scobeyguy
        Hi Tom, Yep, you are absolutely right. I stand corrected. As soon as I saw what you mentioned about using sweeps, it jogged my tired old memory banks and I
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 31, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Tom,

          Yep, you are absolutely right. I stand corrected. As soon as I saw what you mentioned about using sweeps, it jogged my tired old memory banks and I recall reading about that identical method. Somehow I got it twisted around and was thinking they burned out the manure and straw, instead of using it as part of a mold. Is there a generic term which could be used to describe any casting process where the pattern is a one-time deal and is burned out? If not, maybe , "lost pattern" would be appropriate. Basically, anything which will burn out, carbonize, and completely vaporize, could probably be used for the process. Years ago, I cast about 25 small scorpions in sterling silver. They were about two inches long. Even with their hard bodies and body parts like claws, stingers, etc. they made perfect castings.

          Gary

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, giesser@... wrote:
          >
          > Manure and Straw were mixed with silica sand and clay to make a mold for
          > making bells. Both the cope and the drag were made with sweeps, and not an
          > actual bell pattern. Some traditional bell foundries still do this. The
          > manure aids in moisture retention. Both the manure and the chopped straw
          > eliminate mold expansion problems like rat tails and scabs. Most sand molding
          > foundries today use starch and wood flour or cob flour to accomplish the same
          > thing. Manure and straw will work, but, are no longer widely used.
          >
          > "In Pyro Veritas"
          >
          > Tom Cobett
          > Cleveland, OH
          >
          >
          > In a message dated 10/31/2009 10:04:15 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
          > gary_lekvold@... writes:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > There are many variations on the cire perdue, (lost wax) process, but one
          > of the more off-the-wall methods was to use a mixture of cow manure and
          > straw, instead of a wax pattern. I believe this process was used to cast church
          > bells, etc. I just have to ask, would this method be called, "lost crap"
          > casting?
          >
          > Gary
          >
          > --- In _hobbicast@yahoogrouhobbic_ (mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com) ,
          > <jbrennan3@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > At Herman some idiots tried some lost wood castings in iron..
          > > 3 at the other end of the field were small chalices. I didn't see these
          > pours but took the left "efforts" home with me.
          > > The other was a lost Log that was too close to me and it was very
          > scary!!-- didn't work either.
          > > jesse
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.