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Re: Glass saucepan

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  • Dave
    My sister in law melted our glass microwave tray...she was trying to use the timer, but the oven was turned on and it over heated some random scrap of food or
    Message 1 of 15 , May 29, 2009
      My sister in law melted our glass microwave tray...she was trying to use the timer, but the oven was turned on and it over heated some random scrap of food or splatter which melted the pan.

      Dave D
      http://metalshop.homestead.com

      -- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Lyle" <creepinogie@...> wrote:
      >
      > We use a Pyrex glass pan for microwaving sand and soil samples to get the moisture content. You can melt a Pyrex pan in a microwave doing this if your not careful. I would not use it for a crucible.
      > LL
      >
      > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@> wrote:
      > >
      > > While pouring molten metal into glass is a bit foolish..... the "shatter
      > > and spray" event sounds like a highly improbable fantasy scenario.
      > > There is no energy to generate such an event from molten metal hitting
      > > glass...... it would simply break. "shatter and spray" is an explosive
      > > event that generally would only be created by steam.
      > >
      > > graham_h_miller wrote:
      > > > So, it might shatter and spray a mixture of glass shards and molten metal everywhere?
      > > >
      > > > I think I'll keep it in the kitchen and use it for heating up baked beans then.
      > > >
      > > > Thanks everyone!
      > > >
      > > > Graham
      > > >
      > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, David Patterson <odd_kins@> wrote:
      > > >> I used a pyrex storage dish for low temp metal (you can melt it with a match) it worked until i tried to pour lead into it. split into about 20 pieces.
      > > >>
      > > >> Dave Patterson
      > > >> odd_kins@
      > > >> http://home.comcast.net/~oddkins/foundry_home.html
      > > >>
      > > >> --- On Thu, 5/28/09, postello@ <postello@> wrote:
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >> From: postello@ <postello@>
      > > >> Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Glass saucepan
      > > >> To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      > > >> Date: Thursday, May 28, 2009, 6:17 PM
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >> Doing some quick checking, you could probably do Zamac, if it is
      > > >> pyrex. I don't think I would attempt anything with a higher melting
      > > >> point.
      > > >>
      > > >>> I agree, but wasn't there some ad about this in the '60's?, maybe
      > > >> pyrex?
      > > >>>> don't do it !! you don't want to find out.
      > > >>>>
      > > >>>> jesse
      > > >>>> ---- graham_h_miller <graham> wrote:
      > > >>>>> Hi
      > > >>>>>
      > > >>>>> Another daft question!
      > > >>>>>
      > > >>>>> I picked up a funky 70's style glass saucepan in a charity shop
      > > >>>>> today. Would it work as a crucible for aluminium? Or would
      > > >>> something
      > > >>>>> nasty happen?
      > > >>>>>
      > > >>>>> Cheers
      > > >>>>>
      > > >>>>> Graham
      > > >>>>>
      > > >>>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >>
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
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    • Jim
      Glass can store alot of energy in the stresses created as the piece cools. Its entirely dependent on the Glass type/composition and how it s Annealed. Glass
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 1, 2009
        Glass can store alot of energy in the stresses created as the piece cools. Its entirely dependent on the Glass type/composition and how it's Annealed. Glass is not thermally conductive. When working with Glass its very easy to have a piece that is hard on the outside and molten in the center and the opposite is just as easy when your taking to long between reheats
        I'm familiar with Soft Glass,not Boro-silicate or Hard glass so these temps are not for all glass
        Melting temp 1750-2150F (954-1177C)
        annealing temp - 850-950F (454-510C) highest temp it will maintain a solid form
        over 1000F(537C) and it will start to get plastic
        Annealing is a slow process that depends on type of glass and thickness it starts @ the temps listed and decreases gradually to ambient temps 1/4"(6mm) it could be fully annealed in 8 or so hours 2"(52mm) 2-3 days maybe longer

        Take that 2" piece and allow it to air cool, I would fully expect it to send pieces across the room with much enthusiasm, when it pops. A 1/8" thick vase Will pop when air cooled and send its pieces a few inches this is not to say it will not go further or that each will not just crack. its just that the pops are more typical.

        Jim
        Its not a dropped piece. Its Floor Art. Same as Designer Firewood
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