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Re: [hobbicast] Re: Hello!

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  • CaptonZap@aol.com
    In a message dated 5/16/2009 3:04:43 AM Mountain Daylight Time, graham_h_miller@hotmail.com writes: As I m into recycling as a part of the project and also
    Message 1 of 56 , May 16, 2009
      In a message dated 5/16/2009 3:04:43 AM Mountain Daylight Time,
      graham_h_miller@... writes:

      As I'm into recycling as a part of the project and also quite broke I'll
      start looking for scrap bits of plumbing copper pipe that I can weigh and add
      in to the crucible when I melt...

      Graham






      ----------------------------Reply---------------------------


      Take a pair of tin snips and cut the copper into slivers before you add it
      to the melt. It will take less time for it to be absorbed. CZ


      **************Recession-proof vacation ideas. Find free things to do in
      the U.S.
      (http://travel.aol.com/travel-ideas/domestic/national-tourism-week?ncid=emlcntustrav00000002)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dan Brewer
      look at this site for some supplies. http://www.mcgillswarehouse.com/groupslist.aspx?CategoryID=109&CN=FiberBoard,Blanket,Paper Dan in Auburn On Mon, May 18,
      Message 56 of 56 , May 19, 2009
        look at this site for some supplies.
        http://www.mcgillswarehouse.com/groupslist.aspx?CategoryID=109&CN=FiberBoard,Blanket,Paper

        Dan in Auburn

        On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 9:30 PM, Raymond Girard
        <rgirard@...>wrote:

        >
        >
        > Rick:
        >
        > Of what errors and omissions do you speak?
        >
        > Dan:
        >
        > I can buy the soft bricks locally but have to order and ship everything
        > else. I was planning to use the soft bricks for the face, and a certain
        > thickness (undecided) of the kastolite as the external shell. I am now
        > thinking to use a thinner wall of the refractory and use the inswool. Total
        > cost is about the same, but I get more product with less shipping as the
        > wool is lighter than refractory.
        >
        > Dave:
        >
        > We are in Las Vegas. Heat is not really a concern :). It broke 100
        > yesterday and frankly I'm not looking forward to this summer. I think its
        > gonna be a scorcher.
        >
        > Thanks to all for your help.
        >
        >
        > Raymond
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Rick Sparber
        > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Monday, May 18, 2009 7:55 PM
        > Subject: RE: [hobbicast] Electric vs. gas furnace
        >
        > Raymond ,
        >
        > If you plan to follow Hartman's book, you might be interested in the
        > errors I found as I built mine. Nothing earthshaking but there were
        > some rather confusing omissions.
        >
        > Rick
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
        > hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>] On
        > Behalf Of Raymond Girard
        > Sent: Monday, May 18, 2009 6:59 PM
        > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Electric vs. gas furnace
        >
        > Howard:
        >
        > An interesting point. How thick would you suggest for the refractory
        > face and insulating wool.
        >
        > I have a copy of Dan Hartman's Electric Furnace plans and intend to
        > modify them slightly to fit my needs.
        >
        > Again, thanks to all for the input.
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Stone Tool
        > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Monday, May 18, 2009 6:50 PM
        > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Electric vs. gas furnace
        >
        > It is rather illogical to have a massive body of refractory that
        > gets
        > heat soaked during the melt and sits radiating heat for hours
        > afterward.
        > Other than for the ruggedness of the refractory, it would be far
        > more
        > logical to use KO Wool with the surface coating. The coating would
        > create more rugged and rigid surface. KO wool has tremendous
        > insulation
        > capacity, and is very low density. The result would be to keep your
        > heat
        > inside the furnace heating the crucible... not the furnace walls.
        >
        > Howard
        >
        > Raymond Girard wrote:
        > > On this note. Is there any such things too much insulation?
        > >
        > > The refractory seems act both and an insulator keeping the inside
        > hot, but also as a heat repository. When the burner is off, the kiln
        > will remain hot because the refractory is hot. The more refractory,
        > the more energy it takes to get from cold to hot, but the longer it
        > will stay hot.
        > >
        > > I mean, going to an insane extreme, if you had three feet of
        > refractory would there be very little heat loss once the kiln got to
        > temp? Sure it would take some time to heat that much up, but it would
        > stay hot for some time, would it not? This would allow subsequent
        > pours to go much faster.
        > >
        > > Thanks for the input.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: Rick Sparber
        > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2009 8:47 PM
        > > Subject: RE: [hobbicast] Electric vs. gas furnace
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Raymond,
        > >
        > > Melt speed is the big one IMHO. Of course, you do need a
        > sufficient
        > > source of power.
        > >
        > > There are some secondary issues. The heating element will
        > eventually
        > > burn out and need replacing. With care it should last years. You
        > > should also use better insulation than with a gas furnace. I used
        > > backing refractory and faced with fire brick but with gas many use
        > > facing refractory.
        > >
        > > Rick
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
        > hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>]
        > On
        > > Behalf Of Raymond Girard
        > > Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2009 6:34 PM
        > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Electric vs. gas furnace
        > >
        > > Thank you all for the 2p's. I almost have enough to build a new
        > > furnace. ;)
        > >
        > > So the only downside is the melt speed?
        > >
        > > Raymond
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: Rick Sparber
        > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2009 11:32 AM
        > > Subject: RE: [hobbicast] Electric vs. gas furnace
        > >
        > > Jeshua,
        > >
        > > Sorry for the poor wording. I meant to say that the BIG
        > disadvantage
        > > to electric is how SLOW it is to melt the metal. I know that
        > burning
        > > used motor oil takes about 8 minutes for the first melt.
        > >
        > > Rick
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
        > hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>]
        > > On
        > > Behalf Of Jeshua Lacock
        > > Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2009 11:18 AM
        > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Electric vs. gas furnace
        > >
        > > On May 17, 2009, at 9:33 AM, Rick Sparber wrote:
        > >
        > > > The BIG disadvantage is speed. My first melt of the day takes
        > > around
        > > > 90 minutes and subsequent melts take about 45 minutes with a
        > full
        > > > charge of metal. By planning ahead, I rarely wait for the
        > furnace
        > > > since there is so much to do.
        > >
        > > Rick,
        > >
        > > No offense, but 90-minutes for a first melt is not very fast
        > > compared
        > >
        > > to propane (might be compared to charcoal).
        > >
        > > When I run on propane at only 10-psi, I start melting in about 15
        > > minutes from a cold furnace, and I can pour within 30-minutes. If
        > I
        > > bump it up to 15-psi, it starts melting in about 10 minutes.
        > >
        > > Best,
        > >
        > > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
        > > <http://OpenOSX.com>
        > > phone: 877.240.1364
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
        > > this list does not accept attachments.
        > >
        > > Files area and list services are at:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
        > >
        > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
        > > check out these two affiliated sites:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
        > >
        > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
        > >
        > > List Owner:
        > > owly@... <owly%40ttc-cmc.net>
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
        > > this list does not accept attachments.
        > >
        > > Files area and list services are at:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
        > >
        > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
        > > check out these two affiliated sites:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
        > >
        > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
        > >
        > > List Owner:
        > > owly@... <owly%40ttc-cmc.net>
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
        > this list does not accept attachments.
        >
        > Files area and list services are at:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
        >
        > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
        > check out these two affiliated sites:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
        >
        > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
        >
        > List Owner:
        > owly@... <owly%40ttc-cmc.net>
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


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