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Re: Nimitz CVN-77

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  • Dirk F Ganzinga
    Nice work, Bill! Fun to see my own Gingery divider being molded the same way. Molasses cores work great and indeed smell nice ;-) This made me wonder if by
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 10 5:01 AM
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      Nice work, Bill! Fun to see "my own" Gingery divider being molded the same way. Molasses cores work great and indeed smell nice ;-) This made me wonder if by any chance on CVN-77 they used a similar recepy instead of resin bonded sand. For the whole molding block! Why? Resin probably would stink, even more so when heated, sugar does neither. The worker mentioned "a strawberry-like smell" of the sand being poured. In comparison to the cores I baked, a whole block could be just as hard. Until the garden hose comes in. Just a thought.
      Dirk PG1D

      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <sandiego@...> wrote:
      >
      > If you add ordinary molasses to the mix, the gas created by the heated molasses helps to break down the bond... you wont have to use power tools to remove the core :) Smells good too.
      >
      > http://www.stinsonvoyager.com/HomeFoundry.htm
      >
      > Cores are halfway down the page.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Cranston" <dlcranston@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I saw that episode and noted the solid mold. It would appear to be one of
      > > the many resin based molding techniques used by commercial casters. Each
      > > competing supplier has their own special composition. Some systems use a
      > > catalyst to set the sand-resin, some require heat as in shell molding. The
      > > sand after casting tends to require a full processing system to get back to
      > > usability and in some cases can be used only one time.
      > > The closest a DIYer can get is to use sodium silicate. When hit with
      > > a blast of CO2 it gets rock hard and holds it shape very well. In fact, if a
      > > little too much sodium silicate is used it almost requires power tools to
      > > get it out of crevices.
      > >
      > > I haven't looked recently, but I would like to hear if anyone has got a
      > > source of resin molding supplies in reasonable amounts.
      > >
      > > Dennis in Houston
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On
      > > > Behalf Of Dirk F Ganzinga
      > > > Sent: Monday, March 09, 2009 7:52 AM
      > > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Subject: [hobbicast] Nimitz CVN-77
      > > >
      > > > Hi,
      > > > The other day I saw a Discovery-documentary of the building of this
      > > carrier. There
      > > > were some iron parts cast in yellowish, sweet smelling sand. The flask was
      > > > removed after curing and the solid block of sand was lifted away with a
      > > crane using
      > > > only a very simple barred clamping device. The block of sand seemed, had
      > > to be,
      > > > rock hard.
      > > > Any ideas which sand recepy, what kind of sand and curing agents or
      > > additives,
      > > > was used here?
      > > > Best regards, Dirk PG1D
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
      > > > this list does not accept attachments.
      > > >
      > > > Files area and list services are at:
      > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
      > > >
      > > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
      > > > check out these two affiliated sites:
      > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
      > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
      > > >
      > > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
      > > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
      > > >
      > > > List Owner:
      > > > owly@
      > > >
      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Bill
      Thanks for your kind words Dirk. I regret that I never finished the dividing head as a commercial one came into my life right after I made those parts. I did
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 11 6:17 AM
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        Thanks for your kind words Dirk. I regret that I never finished the dividing head as a commercial one came into my life right after I made those parts. I did give away 5 sets of castings to freinds and I know that at least 2 finished them.
        At the bottom of that same page is a part that I made solely using coresand mix. It's was a complex part that required 2 parting lines and a core.

        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Dirk F Ganzinga" <dfg1955@...> wrote:
        >
        > Nice work, Bill! Fun to see "my own" Gingery divider being molded the same way. Molasses cores work great and indeed smell nice ;-) This made me wonder if by any chance on CVN-77 they used a similar recepy instead of resin bonded sand. For the whole molding block! Why? Resin probably would stink, even more so when heated, sugar does neither. The worker mentioned "a strawberry-like smell" of the sand being poured. In comparison to the cores I baked, a whole block could be just as hard. Until the garden hose comes in. Just a thought.
        > Dirk PG1D
        >
        > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <sandiego@> wrote:
        > >
        > > If you add ordinary molasses to the mix, the gas created by the heated molasses helps to break down the bond... you wont have to use power tools to remove the core :) Smells good too.
        > >
        > > http://www.stinsonvoyager.com/HomeFoundry.htm
        > >
        > > Cores are halfway down the page.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Cranston" <dlcranston@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I saw that episode and noted the solid mold. It would appear to be one of
        > > > the many resin based molding techniques used by commercial casters. Each
        > > > competing supplier has their own special composition. Some systems use a
        > > > catalyst to set the sand-resin, some require heat as in shell molding. The
        > > > sand after casting tends to require a full processing system to get back to
        > > > usability and in some cases can be used only one time.
        > > > The closest a DIYer can get is to use sodium silicate. When hit with
        > > > a blast of CO2 it gets rock hard and holds it shape very well. In fact, if a
        > > > little too much sodium silicate is used it almost requires power tools to
        > > > get it out of crevices.
        > > >
        > > > I haven't looked recently, but I would like to hear if anyone has got a
        > > > source of resin molding supplies in reasonable amounts.
        > > >
        > > > Dennis in Houston
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > > -----Original Message-----
        > > > > From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On
        > > > > Behalf Of Dirk F Ganzinga
        > > > > Sent: Monday, March 09, 2009 7:52 AM
        > > > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
        > > > > Subject: [hobbicast] Nimitz CVN-77
        > > > >
        > > > > Hi,
        > > > > The other day I saw a Discovery-documentary of the building of this
        > > > carrier. There
        > > > > were some iron parts cast in yellowish, sweet smelling sand. The flask was
        > > > > removed after curing and the solid block of sand was lifted away with a
        > > > crane using
        > > > > only a very simple barred clamping device. The block of sand seemed, had
        > > > to be,
        > > > > rock hard.
        > > > > Any ideas which sand recepy, what kind of sand and curing agents or
        > > > additives,
        > > > > was used here?
        > > > > Best regards, Dirk PG1D
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > ------------------------------------
        > > > >
        > > > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
        > > > > this list does not accept attachments.
        > > > >
        > > > > Files area and list services are at:
        > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
        > > > >
        > > > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
        > > > > check out these two affiliated sites:
        > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
        > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
        > > > >
        > > > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        > > > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
        > > > >
        > > > > List Owner:
        > > > > owly@
        > > > >
        > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Dirk F Ganzinga
        Nice job too, with the core sand casting. The Gingery divider works well, even with an alu cast worm and wormwheel ;-). I had hoped on some more response to
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 12 3:02 PM
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          Nice job too, with the core sand casting. The Gingery divider works well, even with an alu cast worm and wormwheel ;-). I had hoped on some more response to the Newport recepy question. I reckon it must be ordinary resin sand afterall, with strawberry smell.
          Have a nice day, Dirk PG1D

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <sandiego@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for your kind words Dirk. I regret that I never finished the dividing head as a commercial one came into my life right after I made those parts. I did give away 5 sets of castings to freinds and I know that at least 2 finished them.
          > At the bottom of that same page is a part that I made solely using coresand mix. It's was a complex part that required 2 parting lines and a core.
          >
          > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Dirk F Ganzinga" <dfg1955@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Nice work, Bill! Fun to see "my own" Gingery divider being molded the same way. Molasses cores work great and indeed smell nice ;-) This made me wonder if by any chance on CVN-77 they used a similar recepy instead of resin bonded sand. For the whole molding block! Why? Resin probably would stink, even more so when heated, sugar does neither. The worker mentioned "a strawberry-like smell" of the sand being poured. In comparison to the cores I baked, a whole block could be just as hard. Until the garden hose comes in. Just a thought.
          > > Dirk PG1D
          > >
          > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <sandiego@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > If you add ordinary molasses to the mix, the gas created by the heated molasses helps to break down the bond... you wont have to use power tools to remove the core :) Smells good too.
          > > >
          > > > http://www.stinsonvoyager.com/HomeFoundry.htm
          > > >
          > > > Cores are halfway down the page.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Cranston" <dlcranston@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > I saw that episode and noted the solid mold. It would appear to be one of
          > > > > the many resin based molding techniques used by commercial casters. Each
          > > > > competing supplier has their own special composition. Some systems use a
          > > > > catalyst to set the sand-resin, some require heat as in shell molding. The
          > > > > sand after casting tends to require a full processing system to get back to
          > > > > usability and in some cases can be used only one time.
          > > > > The closest a DIYer can get is to use sodium silicate. When hit with
          > > > > a blast of CO2 it gets rock hard and holds it shape very well. In fact, if a
          > > > > little too much sodium silicate is used it almost requires power tools to
          > > > > get it out of crevices.
          > > > >
          > > > > I haven't looked recently, but I would like to hear if anyone has got a
          > > > > source of resin molding supplies in reasonable amounts.
          > > > >
          > > > > Dennis in Houston
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > > -----Original Message-----
          > > > > > From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On
          > > > > > Behalf Of Dirk F Ganzinga
          > > > > > Sent: Monday, March 09, 2009 7:52 AM
          > > > > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
          > > > > > Subject: [hobbicast] Nimitz CVN-77
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Hi,
          > > > > > The other day I saw a Discovery-documentary of the building of this
          > > > > carrier. There
          > > > > > were some iron parts cast in yellowish, sweet smelling sand. The flask was
          > > > > > removed after curing and the solid block of sand was lifted away with a
          > > > > crane using
          > > > > > only a very simple barred clamping device. The block of sand seemed, had
          > > > > to be,
          > > > > > rock hard.
          > > > > > Any ideas which sand recepy, what kind of sand and curing agents or
          > > > > additives,
          > > > > > was used here?
          > > > > > Best regards, Dirk PG1D
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > ------------------------------------
          > > > > >
          > > > > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
          > > > > > this list does not accept attachments.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Files area and list services are at:
          > > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
          > > > > >
          > > > > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
          > > > > > check out these two affiliated sites:
          > > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
          > > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
          > > > > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
          > > > > >
          > > > > > List Owner:
          > > > > > owly@
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
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