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RE: [hobbicast] Was:So, anyone CAST anything lately Now TV Suggestion

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  • Dick Morris
    A friend had a low cost hydraulic press and a low cost air over hydraulic jack that he was going to marry up so he could make the press work a bit quicker with
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 4, 2009
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      A friend had a low cost hydraulic press and a low cost air over
      hydraulic jack that he was going to marry up so he could make the
      press work a bit quicker with less work. I've thought that this set
      up might be a good substitute for a jolt squeeze machine for smaller
      flasks that could serve double duty as a press.

      At 05:23 PM 3/4/2009, you wrote:

      >I put a steel bar on top of the molds to prevent cope floating and poured
      >the metal. No flask needed during pouring! Good castings, and NO SAND
      >POUNDING!
      >

      Dick Morris
      Anchorage, Alaska
    • Dennis Cranston
      A hydraulic press would probably be even better then my arbor press. Less work, which is my objective. How hard to pack the sand seems to be a quantitative
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 4, 2009
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        A hydraulic press would probably be even better then my arbor press. Less
        work, which is my objective.

        How hard to pack the sand seems to be a quantitative value in industry, but
        a qualitative factor in hobby casting. Sand hardness is measured by how far
        a steel ball is pressed into sand by a a spring with the amount of
        depression measured by a dial indicator. It would be interesting to see a
        home shop designed hardness tester that could be correlated to industrial
        standards. From pictures, I have seen, that the amount of pressure is
        reasonable. But I don't know what that amount is.

        Two interesting points I observed was first, the jolt step was
        really important. Industry uses a sand delivery system that delivers
        'fluffed' sand. I used window screen to run the sand through to be sure
        there were no clumps. The jolt step really leveled the sand in the flask.
        Second point is the lack of need for flasks while pouring the metal.
        There was a minor amount of flash, but no more then I normally get. I have
        always been under the impression that each mold needed a flask when pouring.
        There is the process of using jumping flasks where a tapered flask is move
        from mold to mold when pouring. However, if the mold is weighted, then no
        flask may be needed. Interesting possibilities for experimenting.


        Dennis in Houston



        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf Of Dick Morris
        > Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2009 9:48 PM
        > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [hobbicast] Was:So, anyone CAST anything lately Now TV
        > Suggestion
        >
        > A friend had a low cost hydraulic press and a low cost air over
        > hydraulic jack that he was going to marry up so he could make the
        > press work a bit quicker with less work. I've thought that this set
        > up might be a good substitute for a jolt squeeze machine for smaller
        > flasks that could serve double duty as a press.
        >
        > At 05:23 PM 3/4/2009, you wrote:
        >
        > >I put a steel bar on top of the molds to prevent cope floating and poured
        > >the metal. No flask needed during pouring! Good castings, and NO SAND
        > >POUNDING!
        > >
        >
        > Dick Morris
        > Anchorage, Alaska
        >
        >
        >
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      • Dick Morris
        I a gauge were fitted to the hydraulic side of the jack, it would be easy to get repeatable, and hopefully predictable results. Here is a bench top press that
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 4, 2009
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          I a gauge were fitted to the hydraulic side of the jack, it would be
          easy to get repeatable, and hopefully predictable results.

          Here is a bench top press that might work, although the stroke is a
          bit short at 6-1/2".
          http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=65330



          At 07:17 PM 3/4/2009, you wrote:
          >A hydraulic press would probably be even better then my arbor press. Less
          >work, which is my objective.
          >
          >How hard to pack the sand seems to be a quantitative value in industry, but
          >a qualitative factor in hobby casting.

          Dick Morris
          Anchorage, Alaska
        • Jim Morton
          Dennis:   I saw that very same episode & marvelled at how fast the employee (which showed Mike how to make up the mold) was.  Of course, when you are paid by
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 5, 2009
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            Dennis:
             
            I saw that very same episode & marvelled at how fast the employee (which showed Mike how to make up the mold) was.  Of course, when you are paid by the piece, you do become very fast at what you do over time - but this guy FLEW through the process!
             
            I have been giving some thought to trying this myself - but I've had two bad habits to support get in the way - namely, eating and sleeping under a roof.  LOL
             
            Seriously, how many tries did it take before you arrived at a consistent method/feel for the pressure confidence?  Does this method perform well enough to consider giving up "normal" pounding of the cope & drag (for small parts anyway)?
             
            Thanks for the info!
             
            Jim




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