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Zinc mould

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  • Brian Kwan
    Home Foundrymen s discussion forum on home metal castingI am planning to slush cast pewter vials in the style of medieval pilgrim ampullae. I have tried slush
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 9, 2009
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      Home Foundrymen's discussion forum on home metal castingI am planning to slush cast pewter vials in the style of medieval pilgrim ampullae. I have tried slush casting in wood and silicone moulds, but apparently a metal mould is required to cool the outer layer and allow the molten centre to drain. I would like to use zinc to make the mould rather than the more traditional bronze, just because it uses less gas. Does anyone know the suitability of zinc as a mould for pewter?

      I also plan to make the design using air-drying clay from a craft store. I expect that this would easily withstand the temperature of molten zinc, but can it be used for bronze/brass casting if this is necessary?

      Regards Brian

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jbrennan3@austin.rr.com
      this should work fine. see http://www.eazall.com/moldbase.aspx you can find more on zinc alloys here too. jesse
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 9, 2009
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        this should work fine. see http://www.eazall.com/moldbase.aspx
        you can find more on zinc alloys here too.
        jesse
        ---- Brian Kwan <bkwan@...> wrote:
        > Home Foundrymen's discussion forum on home metal castingI am planning to slush cast pewter vials in the style of medieval pilgrim ampullae. I have tried slush casting in wood and silicone moulds, but apparently a metal mould is required to cool the outer layer and allow the molten centre to drain. I would like to use zinc to make the mould rather than the more traditional bronze, just because it uses less gas. Does anyone know the suitability of zinc as a mould for pewter?
        >
        > I also plan to make the design using air-drying clay from a craft store. I expect that this would easily withstand the temperature of molten zinc, but can it be used for bronze/brass casting if this is necessary?
        >
        > Regards Brian
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Lyle
        Why not just sluch cast the pewter in an RTV rubber mold? Easy to make, easy to use, and cheap. If I made a permanent metal mold, I d use aluminum. LL ... to
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 9, 2009
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          Why not just sluch cast the pewter in an RTV rubber mold? Easy to make,
          easy to use, and cheap. If I made a permanent metal mold, I'd use
          aluminum.
          LL

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Kwan" <bkwan@...> wrote:
          >
          > Home Foundrymen's discussion forum on home metal castingI am planning
          to slush cast pewter vials in the style of medieval pilgrim ampullae. I
          have tried slush casting in wood and silicone moulds, but apparently a
          metal mould is required to cool the outer layer and allow the molten
          centre to drain. I would like to use zinc to make the mould rather than
          the more traditional bronze, just because it uses less gas. Does anyone
          know the suitability of zinc as a mould for pewter?
          >
          > I also plan to make the design using air-drying clay from a craft
          store. I expect that this would easily withstand the temperature of
          molten zinc, but can it be used for bronze/brass casting if this is
          necessary?
          >
          > Regards Brian
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Andrew Werby
          1a. Zinc mould Posted by: Brian Kwan bkwan@slingshot.co.nz bcaffa Date: Fri Jan 9, 2009 12:32 am ((PST)) Home Foundrymen s discussion forum on home metal
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 9, 2009
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            1a. Zinc mould
            Posted by: "Brian Kwan" bkwan@... bcaffa
            Date: Fri Jan 9, 2009 12:32 am ((PST))

            Home Foundrymen's discussion forum on home metal castingI am planning to
            slush cast pewter vials in the style of medieval pilgrim ampullae. I
            have tried slush casting in wood and silicone moulds, but apparently a
            metal mould is required to cool the outer layer and allow the molten
            centre to drain. I would like to use zinc to make the mould rather than
            the more traditional bronze, just because it uses less gas. Does anyone
            know the suitability of zinc as a mould for pewter?
            [I'd do some tests before getting too hopeful about this. Zinc isn't too
            far off of pewter in terms of melting point; there may be some
            distortion of the mold, or adhesion. Try pouring some pewter onto a
            piece of zinc and see what happens. Saving a little gas isn't the main
            objective; it's getting this process to work. I'd suggest trying it the
            way that's been known to work before, then trying to refine the process
            to be cheaper or whatever afterwards.]

            I also plan to make the design using air-drying clay from a craft store.
            I expect that this would easily withstand the temperature of molten
            zinc, but can it be used for bronze/brass casting if this is necessary?

            [I'm not sure about this one either. "Airdrying" clay typically has
            polymers added to give it strength in the absence of firing. When you
            pour hot zinc on it, these will volatilize, as well as any water trapped
            inside. The effects can range from minor porosity in your zinc to a
            major explosion. These effects would only be greater if you used bronze
            instead of zinc, since it's a lot hotter.
            Metal casting has been practiced for thousands of years. There are many
            techniques that have been known to work. These are not among them. If
            your aim is experimentation and the development of new casting
            technologies, go ahead on (using appropriate safety measures). But if
            you're mostly just trying to make parts, then use casting methods that
            have been proved to actually work. If you're trying to recreate an
            antique part, then researching and applying the technique that was
            originally developed to make them (or as close as you can come to it)
            would seem to be the place to start.]

            Andrew Werby
            www.unitedartworks.com
          • postello@msu.edu
            I though that most of the medieval ampullae were made of lead. I would try a test piece, but I suspect that the molten pewter would melt the zinc. Did you
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 9, 2009
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              I though that most of the medieval ampullae were made of lead. I
              would try a test piece, but I suspect that the molten pewter would
              melt the zinc. Did you think of trying an aluminum mold? You can cast
              lead fishing sinkers in aluminum molds. There might be silicone
              molding compounds that allow you to slush cast pewter, but I don't do
              pewter, so I don't know for sure..


              > Quoting "Andrew Werby" <andrew@...>:

              > 1a. Zinc mould
              > Posted by: "Brian Kwan" bkwan@... bcaffa
              > Date: Fri Jan 9, 2009 12:32 am ((PST))
              >
              > Home Foundrymen's discussion forum on home metal castingI am
              planning to
              > slush cast pewter vials in the style of medieval pilgrim ampullae.
              I
              > have tried slush casting in wood and silicone moulds, but
              apparently a
              > metal mould is required to cool the outer layer and allow the
              molten
              > centre to drain. I would like to use zinc to make the mould rather
              than
              > the more traditional bronze, just because it uses less gas. Does
              anyone
              > know the suitability of zinc as a mould for pewter?
              > [I'd do some tests before getting too hopeful about this. Zinc
              isn't too
              > far off of pewter in terms of melting point; there may be some
              > distortion of the mold, or adhesion. Try pouring some pewter onto a
              > piece of zinc and see what happens. Saving a little gas isn't the
              main
              > objective; it's getting this process to work. I'd suggest trying it
              the
              > way that's been known to work before, then trying to refine the
              process
              > to be cheaper or whatever afterwards.]
              >
              > I also plan to make the design using air-drying clay from a craft
              store.
              > I expect that this would easily withstand the temperature of molten
              > zinc, but can it be used for bronze/brass casting if this is
              necessary?
              >
              > [I'm not sure about this one either. "Airdrying" clay typically has
              > polymers added to give it strength in the absence of firing. When
              you
              > pour hot zinc on it, these will volatilize, as well as any water
              trapped
              > inside. The effects can range from minor porosity in your zinc to a
              > major explosion. These effects would only be greater if you used
              bronze
              > instead of zinc, since it's a lot hotter.
              > Metal casting has been practiced for thousands of years. There are
              many
              > techniques that have been known to work. These are not among them.
              If
              > your aim is experimentation and the development of new casting
              > technologies, go ahead on (using appropriate safety measures). But
              if
              > you're mostly just trying to make parts, then use casting methods
              that
              > have been proved to actually work. If you're trying to recreate an
              > antique part, then researching and applying the technique that was
              > originally developed to make them (or as close as you can come to
              it)
              > would seem to be the place to start.]
              >
              > Andrew Werby
              > www.unitedartworks.com
              >
            • Brian Kwan
              Thanks for the pointers, I will try a couple of experiments and then Plan B if necessary. I will pour some pewter on my zinc ingot to see if it sticks, and I
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 9, 2009
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                Thanks for the pointers, I will try a couple of experiments and then Plan B
                if necessary. I will pour some pewter on my zinc ingot to see if it sticks,
                and I have normal clay as a backup. I need to add zinc to my previously
                melted brass anyway.

                Regards Brian


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Andrew Werby" <a.werby@...>
                To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>; <bkwan@...>
                Sent: Saturday, January 10, 2009 9:00 AM
                Subject: Re: Zinc mould


                > 1a. Zinc mould
                > Posted by: "Brian Kwan" bkwan@... bcaffa
                > Date: Fri Jan 9, 2009 12:32 am ((PST))
                >
                > Home Foundrymen's discussion forum on home metal castingI am planning to
                > slush cast pewter vials in the style of medieval pilgrim ampullae. I have
                > tried slush casting in wood and silicone moulds, but apparently a metal
                > mould is required to cool the outer layer and allow the molten centre to
                > drain. I would like to use zinc to make the mould rather than the more
                > traditional bronze, just because it uses less gas. Does anyone know the
                > suitability of zinc as a mould for pewter?
                > [I'd do some tests before getting too hopeful about this. Zinc isn't too
                > far off of pewter in terms of melting point; there may be some distortion
                > of the mold, or adhesion. Try pouring some pewter onto a piece of zinc and
                > see what happens. Saving a little gas isn't the main objective; it's
                > getting this process to work. I'd suggest trying it the way that's been
                > known to work before, then trying to refine the process to be cheaper or
                > whatever afterwards.]
                >
                > I also plan to make the design using air-drying clay from a craft store. I
                > expect that this would easily withstand the temperature of molten zinc,
                > but can it be used for bronze/brass casting if this is necessary?
                >
                > [I'm not sure about this one either. "Airdrying" clay typically has
                > polymers added to give it strength in the absence of firing. When you pour
                > hot zinc on it, these will volatilize, as well as any water trapped
                > inside. The effects can range from minor porosity in your zinc to a major
                > explosion. These effects would only be greater if you used bronze instead
                > of zinc, since it's a lot hotter.
                > Metal casting has been practiced for thousands of years. There are many
                > techniques that have been known to work. These are not among them. If your
                > aim is experimentation and the development of new casting technologies, go
                > ahead on (using appropriate safety measures). But if you're mostly just
                > trying to make parts, then use casting methods that have been proved to
                > actually work. If you're trying to recreate an antique part, then
                > researching and applying the technique that was originally developed to
                > make them (or as close as you can come to it) would seem to be the place
                > to start.]
                >
                > Andrew Werby
                > www.unitedartworks.com
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Regards Brian
                >
              • Gary Lekvold
                Hi Brian, If you think about it, the ingredients in pewter and the zinc combined, sounds a lot like solder doesn t it? I cast my ingot molds out of aluminum.
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 9, 2009
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                  Hi Brian,

                  If you think about it, the ingredients in pewter and the zinc
                  combined, sounds a lot like solder doesn't it? I cast my ingot molds
                  out of aluminum. Then I pour molten aluminum into the aluminum molds.
                  The chill factor you are talking about is what makes this possible.
                  However---- I have to be very careful to not weld the two together.
                  Oh great, this is where I get to tell a global audience about my
                  "special mixture". I have a small bottle with a wick in it. The
                  bottle is filled with a mixture of lacquer thinner, gasoline, 10w oil,
                  kerosene, 90w oil, lighter fluid, mineral spirits, and a lot of other
                  stuff. I light the wick and the black soot that comes out is
                  fabulous. I totally cover every surface on the inside of the ingot
                  molds with a layer of soot before each pour. Before I did this, I
                  lost a couple of molds due to welding. If you have a bottle of
                  acetylene and a torch handy, they will provide the best and quickest soot.

                  Gary

                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Kwan" <bkwan@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks for the pointers, I will try a couple of experiments and then
                  Plan B
                  > if necessary. I will pour some pewter on my zinc ingot to see if it
                  sticks,
                  > and I have normal clay as a backup. I need to add zinc to my previously
                  > melted brass anyway.
                  >
                  > Regards Brian
                  >
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "Andrew Werby" <a.werby@...>
                  > To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>; <bkwan@...>
                  > Sent: Saturday, January 10, 2009 9:00 AM
                  > Subject: Re: Zinc mould
                  >
                  >
                  > > 1a. Zinc mould
                  > > Posted by: "Brian Kwan" bkwan@... bcaffa
                  > > Date: Fri Jan 9, 2009 12:32 am ((PST))
                  > >
                  > > Home Foundrymen's discussion forum on home metal castingI am
                  planning to
                  > > slush cast pewter vials in the style of medieval pilgrim ampullae.
                  I have
                  > > tried slush casting in wood and silicone moulds, but apparently a
                  metal
                  > > mould is required to cool the outer layer and allow the molten
                  centre to
                  > > drain. I would like to use zinc to make the mould rather than the
                  more
                  > > traditional bronze, just because it uses less gas. Does anyone
                  know the
                  > > suitability of zinc as a mould for pewter?
                  > > [I'd do some tests before getting too hopeful about this. Zinc
                  isn't too
                  > > far off of pewter in terms of melting point; there may be some
                  distortion
                  > > of the mold, or adhesion. Try pouring some pewter onto a piece of
                  zinc and
                  > > see what happens. Saving a little gas isn't the main objective; it's
                  > > getting this process to work. I'd suggest trying it the way that's
                  been
                  > > known to work before, then trying to refine the process to be
                  cheaper or
                  > > whatever afterwards.]
                  > >
                  > > I also plan to make the design using air-drying clay from a craft
                  store. I
                  > > expect that this would easily withstand the temperature of molten
                  zinc,
                  > > but can it be used for bronze/brass casting if this is necessary?
                  > >
                  > > [I'm not sure about this one either. "Airdrying" clay typically has
                  > > polymers added to give it strength in the absence of firing. When
                  you pour
                  > > hot zinc on it, these will volatilize, as well as any water trapped
                  > > inside. The effects can range from minor porosity in your zinc to
                  a major
                  > > explosion. These effects would only be greater if you used bronze
                  instead
                  > > of zinc, since it's a lot hotter.
                  > > Metal casting has been practiced for thousands of years. There are
                  many
                  > > techniques that have been known to work. These are not among them.
                  If your
                  > > aim is experimentation and the development of new casting
                  technologies, go
                  > > ahead on (using appropriate safety measures). But if you're mostly
                  just
                  > > trying to make parts, then use casting methods that have been
                  proved to
                  > > actually work. If you're trying to recreate an antique part, then
                  > > researching and applying the technique that was originally
                  developed to
                  > > make them (or as close as you can come to it) would seem to be the
                  place
                  > > to start.]
                  > >
                  > > Andrew Werby
                  > > www.unitedartworks.com
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Regards Brian
                  > >
                  >
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