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melting glass

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  • kdurstine
    Haven t read anyone here discussing casting glass for awhile but I stumbled onto this, might have some applications.... Kenny
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 12, 2008
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      Haven't read anyone here discussing casting glass for awhile but I
      stumbled onto this, might have some applications....

      Kenny
    • Clint D
      Kenny run into what? link? Clint ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 13, 2008
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        Kenny
        run into what? link?
        Clint

        kdurstine wrote:
        > Haven't read anyone here discussing casting glass for awhile but I
        > stumbled onto this, might have some applications....
        >
        > Kenny
        >
        >
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      • kdurstine
        ... Hmmm, the link didn t make it. http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1004040/melt_a_frickn_beer_bottle/ You might have to click on the advanced button for the
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 13, 2008
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          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Clint D <driggars@...> wrote:
          >
          > Kenny
          > run into what? link?
          > Clint
          >
          Hmmm, the link didn't make it.

          http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1004040/melt_a_frickn_beer_bottle/

          You might have to click on the advanced button for the video to play.

          Apparently, once you get heat glass to the point where some of it is
          dull red, it absorbs micrwave energy just fine. The video shows a guy
          heating a beer bottle with a MAPP torch until a small part glows,
          then zapping it in a microwave and melting a big hole in it. I think
          I remember several years back some people discussing glass casting by
          placing ground glass over a mold and then putting it in an oven, the
          glass melts and then slumps into the mold.

          Kenny
        • Rexarino
          There are now microwave kilns for glass workers, used for small slumped and fused items like pendants. The Bullseye Glass gallery here in Portland has some
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 13, 2008
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            There are now microwave kilns for glass workers, used for small slumped and
            fused items like pendants.

            The Bullseye Glass gallery here in Portland has some really nice examples of
            glass castings done by the employees. My son and I toured it this afternoon
            for his birthday.

            Melting ground glass (frit) into a mold is one of many ways to shape glass.
            One thing I want to try is a "pot melt" where a bunch of varying colors of
            glass are stacked together in a raised clay pot, then heated in the kiln
            until the glass fuses and flows out of the pot - I've seen some very
            striking designs.

            rex

            On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 12:00 PM, kdurstine <kdurstine@...> wrote:

            > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Clint D <driggars@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Kenny
            > > run into what? link?
            > > Clint
            > >
            > Hmmm, the link didn't make it.
            >
            > http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1004040/melt_a_frickn_beer_bottle/
            >
            > You might have to click on the advanced button for the video to play.
            >
            > Apparently, once you get heat glass to the point where some of it is
            > dull red, it absorbs micrwave energy just fine. The video shows a guy
            > heating a beer bottle with a MAPP torch until a small part glows,
            > then zapping it in a microwave and melting a big hole in it. I think
            > I remember several years back some people discussing glass casting by
            > placing ground glass over a mold and then putting it in an oven, the
            > glass melts and then slumps into the mold.
            >
            > Kenny
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lyle
            You can melt glass is a standard microwave oven although I doubt it s good for it. I first noticed it happening when we dried a soil sample for a proctor test.
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 14, 2008
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              You can melt glass is a standard microwave oven although I doubt it's
              good for it. I first noticed it happening when we dried a soil sample
              for a proctor test. The sample was in pyrex cake dish and I've seen
              it happen a few times since then.
              LL

              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Rexarino <rexarino@...> wrote:
              >
              > There are now microwave kilns for glass workers, used for small
              slumped and
              > fused items like pendants.
              >
              > The Bullseye Glass gallery here in Portland has some really nice
              examples of
              > glass castings done by the employees. My son and I toured it this
              afternoon
              > for his birthday.
              >
              > Melting ground glass (frit) into a mold is one of many ways to
              shape glass.
              > One thing I want to try is a "pot melt" where a bunch of varying
              colors of
              > glass are stacked together in a raised clay pot, then heated in the
              kiln
              > until the glass fuses and flows out of the pot - I've seen some very
              > striking designs.
              >
              > rex
              >
              > On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 12:00 PM, kdurstine <kdurstine@...> wrote:
              >
              > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Clint D <driggars@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Kenny
              > > > run into what? link?
              > > > Clint
              > > >
              > > Hmmm, the link didn't make it.
              > >
              > > http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1004040/melt_a_frickn_beer_bottle/
              > >
              > > You might have to click on the advanced button for the video to
              play.
              > >
              > > Apparently, once you get heat glass to the point where some of it
              is
              > > dull red, it absorbs micrwave energy just fine. The video shows a
              guy
              > > heating a beer bottle with a MAPP torch until a small part glows,
              > > then zapping it in a microwave and melting a big hole in it. I
              think
              > > I remember several years back some people discussing glass
              casting by
              > > placing ground glass over a mold and then putting it in an oven,
              the
              > > glass melts and then slumps into the mold.
              > >
              > > Kenny
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • oldstudentmsgt
              About 30 years ago, I put a chicken pot pie in an aluminum foil pan in my monster Kenmore microwave, and set it for 10 minutes. It was on a glass dish. No
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 14, 2008
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                About 30 years ago, I put a chicken pot pie in an aluminum foil pan
                in my monster Kenmore microwave, and set it for 10 minutes. It was on
                a glass dish. No preheating, frozen pot pie. I melted the bottom out
                of the glass dish, and filled my house with acrid black smoke, and
                irritated the heck out of my ex.

                Preheating is not necessary if your microwave is fairly powerful.

                Bill in OKC.

                BTW, you can melt glass with a propane torch, but most of the fancy
                glassblowers use oxy-acetylene.


                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "kdurstine" <kdurstine@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Clint D <driggars@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Kenny
                > > run into what? link?
                > > Clint
                > >
                > Hmmm, the link didn't make it.
                >
                > http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1004040/melt_a_frickn_beer_bottle/
                >
                > You might have to click on the advanced button for the video to
                play.
                >
                > Apparently, once you get heat glass to the point where some of it
                is
                > dull red, it absorbs micrwave energy just fine. The video shows a
                guy
                > heating a beer bottle with a MAPP torch until a small part glows,
                > then zapping it in a microwave and melting a big hole in it. I
                think
                > I remember several years back some people discussing glass casting
                by
                > placing ground glass over a mold and then putting it in an oven,
                the
                > glass melts and then slumps into the mold.
                >
                > Kenny
                >
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