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Gingery Crucible Book

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  • jer29_11_13
    Does anyone have this book? How is it - any good? Has anyone made their own crucibles following this book - if so how were they? Thanks for your review -
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 25, 2008
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      Does anyone have this book? How is it - any good?

      Has anyone made their own crucibles following this book - if so how
      were they?

      Thanks for your review - advice?

      Fred
    • John Junkroski
      I bought the book about six months ago. As a total rookie at casting, I think it is a good introduction, but to use this method you need a lathe ( and some
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 25, 2008
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        I bought the book about six months ago.
        As a total rookie at casting, I think it is a good introduction, but
        to use this method you need a lathe ( and some knowledge of how to
        use it ) to make a form.
        I've set it aside and will purchase commercial crucibles for my first
        attempts.

        John

        On June 25, 2008Wednesday, at 8:22 PM, jer29_11_13 wrote:

        > Does anyone have this book? How is it - any good?
        >
        > Has anyone made their own crucibles following this book - if so how
        > were they?
        >
        > Thanks for your review - advice?
        >
        > Fred
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • terry l. ridder
        hello; ... yes i have the book. it is very good quality and information. ... they are very good. following the instructions concerning air-drying ,
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 26, 2008
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          hello;

          On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, jer29_11_13 wrote:

          > Does anyone have this book? How is it - any good?
          >

          yes i have the book.
          it is very good quality and information.

          >
          > Has anyone made their own crucibles following
          > this book - if so how were they?
          >

          they are very good.
          following the instructions concerning air-drying
          , kiln-drying, then glazing they came out very nice.
          there were two that i did question their integrity
          so they are now pencil holders and a shop flower vase.

          >
          > Thanks for your review - advice?
          >
          > Fred
          >

          --
          terry l. ridder ><>
        • Bill
          I have great respect for Gingery but, making your own crucibles is that WORST place to be fooling around. Purchase a good crucible, treat it with care. It s
          Message 4 of 17 , Jun 26, 2008
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            I have great respect for Gingery but, making your own crucibles is
            that WORST place to be fooling around.
            Purchase a good crucible, treat it with care. It's the best money
            you'll spend not only from a casting quality aspect for more
            importantly, for SAFETY.

            I'm been making castings both for a living and for a hobby since the
            60s. I've seen more crucible accidents that I care to remember, all
            but one resulted in serious ugly injuries.

            The molten metal in that pot looks beautiful and serene but let it
            out and it's an ugly meanace that can will burn without mercy.





            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "jer29_11_13" <fconte@...> wrote:
            >
            > Does anyone have this book? How is it - any good?
            >
            > Has anyone made their own crucibles following this book - if so how
            > were they?
            >
            > Thanks for your review - advice?
            >
            > Fred
            >
          • Ron Thompson
            I bought the book on Gingery s reputation amassed from his other works. It is typical in that it provides good coverage of the material and is a workable
            Message 5 of 17 , Jun 26, 2008
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              I bought the book on Gingery's reputation amassed from his other works.
              It is typical in that it provides good coverage of the material and is a
              workable solution.
              That said, I decided the small amount of possible savings over store
              bought crucibles wasn't worth it. Regular crucibles last a long time if
              cared for properly and truly aren't that expensive. This has been the
              consensus from castinghobby, as well. Your mileage may vary.
              --


              Ron Thompson
              Riding my '07 XL883C Sportster
              On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast,
              right beside the Kennedy Space Center,
              USA

              http://www.plansandprojects.com
              My hobby pages are here:
              http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

              Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
              http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/

              Add yourself to the member map here:
              http://www.frappr.com/castinghobby

              Want to have some fun? The next time you're at McDonald's, wait until
              the kid has your change ready and then say "Wait, I've got the two cents."
              -Ron Thompson


              jer29_11_13 wrote:
              >
              >
              > Does anyone have this book? How is it - any good?
              >
              > Has anyone made their own crucibles following this book - if so how
              > were they?
              >
              > Thanks for your review - advice?
              >
              > Fred
              >
              >
            • Chris Horne
              ... Fred, I have no doubt that it can be done, but, I have been casting since 1976, home casting since 2005, I have a whole workshop full of home built
              Message 6 of 17 , Jun 27, 2008
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                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "jer29_11_13" <fconte@...> wrote:
                >
                > Does anyone have this book? How is it - any good?
                >
                > Has anyone made their own crucibles following this book - if so how
                > were they?
                >
                > Thanks for your review - advice?
                >
                > Fred
                >

                Fred, I have no doubt that it can be done, but, I have been casting
                since 1976, home casting since 2005, I have a whole workshop full of
                home built machines, and like several others, I would not consider
                using home made ceramic crucibles.

                Do yourself a favour, buy your crucibles, as well as wear proper
                footwear, gloves and a face mask, don't cast direct on concrete, and
                avoid water and hot metal like the plague!

                with the best of intentions.. and apologies if I am preaching to the
                converted...

                Chris
              • jer29_11_13
                ... Many thanks to everyone for your valued input!!! Chris - you can preach anytime - no offense taken...thanks! Though I have been reading all the posts for
                Message 7 of 17 , Jun 28, 2008
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                  > Fred, I have no doubt that it can be done, but, I have been casting
                  > since 1976, home casting since 2005, I have a whole workshop full of
                  > home built machines, and like several others, I would not consider
                  > using home made ceramic crucibles.
                  >
                  > Do yourself a favour, buy your crucibles, as well as wear proper
                  > footwear, gloves and a face mask, don't cast direct on concrete, and
                  > avoid water and hot metal like the plague!
                  >
                  > with the best of intentions.. and apologies if I am preaching to the
                  > converted...
                  >
                  > Chris
                  >

                  Many thanks to everyone for your valued input!!!

                  Chris - you can preach anytime - no offense taken...thanks!

                  Though I have been reading all the posts for nearly a year now and
                  have several books I can't even be considered a newbie cause I don't
                  have a furnance...yet! The only thing I lack is a local source for
                  the refractory. The closest place is over 3 hours from me, which is
                  a little to far to drive especially with the gasoline prices so high.

                  Fred
                • Ron Thompson
                  Don t let that stop you. Refractory is not essential to furnace manufacture. You can make your furnace with a steel inner and outer skin and air, sand or dirt
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jun 28, 2008
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                    Don't let that stop you. Refractory is not essential to furnace
                    manufacture. You can make your furnace with a steel inner and outer skin
                    and air, sand or dirt in between. It may use a little more fuel and the
                    inner liner will burn out eventually, but it will get you melting.
                    People were melting metal long before anyone sold refractory.
                    --


                    Ron Thompson
                    Riding my '07 XL883C Sportster
                    On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast,
                    right beside the Kennedy Space Center,
                    USA

                    http://www.plansandprojects.com
                    My hobby pages are here:
                    http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

                    Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
                    http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/

                    Add yourself to the member map here:
                    http://www.frappr.com/castinghobby

                    Want to have some fun? The next time you're at McDonald's, wait until
                    the kid has your change ready and then say "Wait, I've got the two cents."
                    -Ron Thompson


                    jer29_11_13 wrote:
                    > >
                    >
                    > Many thanks to everyone for your valued input!!!
                    >
                    > Chris - you can preach anytime - no offense taken...thanks!
                    >
                    > Though I have been reading all the posts for nearly a year now and
                    > have several books I can't even be considered a newbie cause I don't
                    > have a furnance...yet! The only thing I lack is a local source for
                    > the refractory. The closest place is over 3 hours from me, which is
                    > a little to far to drive especially with the gasoline prices so high.
                    >
                    > Fred
                  • Jeshua Lacock
                    ... True - and let us not forget that the oldest furnace in the world is a hole in the ground! I made a really nice hole furnace that used no refractory and no
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jun 28, 2008
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                      On Jun 28, 2008, at 6:01 PM, Ron Thompson wrote:
                      > Don't let that stop you. Refractory is not essential to furnace
                      > manufacture. You can make your furnace with a steel inner and outer
                      > skin
                      > and air, sand or dirt in between. It may use a little more fuel and
                      > the
                      > inner liner will burn out eventually, but it will get you melting.
                      > People were melting metal long before anyone sold refractory.


                      True - and let us not forget that the oldest furnace in the world is a
                      hole in the ground!

                      I made a really nice hole furnace that used no refractory and no
                      lining...

                      Fred, you also might look at ordering some fiber blanket (like
                      Kaowool), it is relatively light compared to castable refractory, and
                      is well worth the price in my opinion. You can get it on ebay or most
                      pottery stores.


                      Cheers,

                      Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                      <http://OpenOSX.com>
                      phone: 877.240.1364
                    • jer29_11_13
                      ... outer ... and ... is a ... Thanks Ron and Jeshua! You both made me realize that I have gotten caught up in all the nice propane furnaces I ve seen and read
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jun 28, 2008
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                        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > On Jun 28, 2008, at 6:01 PM, Ron Thompson wrote:
                        > > Don't let that stop you. Refractory is not essential to furnace
                        > > manufacture. You can make your furnace with a steel inner and
                        outer
                        > > skin
                        > > and air, sand or dirt in between. It may use a little more fuel
                        and
                        > > the
                        > > inner liner will burn out eventually, but it will get you melting.


                        > True - and let us not forget that the oldest furnace in the world
                        is a
                        > hole in the ground!
                        >
                        > I made a really nice hole furnace that used no refractory and no
                        > lining...
                        >
                        > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                        > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                        > phone: 877.240.1364
                        >

                        Thanks Ron and Jeshua!

                        You both made me realize that I have gotten caught up in all the nice
                        propane furnaces I've seen and read about, I truly lost sight of the
                        original goal - to melt metal!(LOL)
                        I have several 20 gal well tanks, parts to make the propane burners,
                        regulators, etc. but not having the refractory has been a major
                        stumbling block for me.

                        I didn't consider making my own refractory from various recipes
                        because I was under the impression that they weren't that good. But
                        I could have been melting metal - not in the most energy efficient
                        way - but melting and casting none the less! This has to be the
                        biggest DUH! on my part(LOL!) and probably won't be the last...

                        Thanks for the encouragement and suggestions.

                        Regards - Fred
                      • John
                        In our local museum (Peterborough UK) there used to be an exhibit that I omitted to take a photo of, Along the banks of the river Nene nearby was the Roman
                        Message 11 of 17 , Jun 29, 2008
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                          In our local museum (Peterborough UK) there used to be an exhibit that I omitted to take a photo of,
                          Along the banks of the river Nene nearby was the Roman settlement called Durobrivae where the pottery known now as Castorware was produced from the clay that these days is used for house bricks. This has nothing directly to do with metal as the exhibit was bronze orientated. The display was a complete Roman furnace for melting bronze that had apparently been removed from the North side of the valley so the front of this furnace would obviously then faced the prevailing winds which are from the South to South West. The furnace had been made from the clay from the surrounding area as must have been some sort of vessel in which it was melted but at the time I saw the display I was not interested in casting so took not much notice of the finer details. One day I'll return to the museum and ask if I can get to see the cabinet with this display in and take some photos but the point of the mail is that it used clay from the ground as opposed to anything fancy.
                          Moving on a little As far as I know there are no remains of the kilns used to fire the pottery but perhaps they are of not much interest to local visitors so are not included in the displays but might be something else to make inquiries about.
                          John.

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Brian Pitt
                          ... theres probably one closer than that ,call around to the local fireplace and wood stove shops or ask any building contractor where they would go if they
                          Message 12 of 17 , Jun 29, 2008
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                            On Saturday 28 June 2008 12:34, jer29_11_13 wrote:
                            > The only thing I lack is a local source for
                            > the refractory.   The closest place is over 3 hours from me, which is
                            > a little to far to drive especially with the gasoline prices so high.
                            > Fred

                            theres probably one closer than that ,call around to the local fireplace and wood stove shops
                            or ask any building contractor where they would go if they had to repair a chimney or furnace
                            they may not stock it ,but they can have it there inside a week

                            or have it sent right to your door
                            http://www.seattlepotterysupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc
                            look under Kilns & Supplies

                            Brian
                            --
                            "Nemo me impune lacesset"
                          • MAGGIE ALLEN
                            Hey there, folks- These days we take for granted the wide array of materials & supplies that we have access to. In days of yor, people wouldn t generally
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jun 29, 2008
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                              Hey there, folks-
                              These days we take for granted the wide array of materials & supplies that we have access to. In days of yor, people wouldn't generally import large weights of clay at huge expense, they'd use the best local clay they had & live with the attendant failure rates. My meaning is that it was cheaper to use local materials with only a 20% success rate, than to import a wagon load of much better clay from accross the country at the cost of a third of a year's income. (Note that these numbers are pulled from my butt, but you take my meaning.) Another thing to add to your estimation of few finds of furnacesor kilns (or molds, for that matter) is that being basically earth materials, they tend to rejoin the ground from which they came.

                              John <elijon@...> wrote:
                              In our local museum (Peterborough UK) there used to be an exhibit that I omitted to take a photo of,
                              Along the banks of the river Nene nearby was the Roman settlement called Durobrivae where the pottery known now as Castorware was produced from the clay that these days is used for house bricks. This has nothing directly to do with metal as the exhibit was bronze orientated. The display was a complete Roman furnace for melting bronze that had apparently been removed from the North side of the valley so the front of this furnace would obviously then faced the prevailing winds which are from the South to South West. The furnace had been made from the clay from the surrounding area as must have been some sort of vessel in which it was melted but at the time I saw the display I was not interested in casting so took not much notice of the finer details. One day I'll return to the museum and ask if I can get to see the cabinet with this display in and take some photos but the point of the mail is that it used clay from the ground as opposed to anything fancy.
                              Moving on a little As far as I know there are no remains of the kilns used to fire the pottery but perhaps they are of not much interest to local visitors so are not included in the displays but might be something else to make inquiries about.
                              John.

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                              Yvan Wolvesbane
                              Pacifist....with occasional lapses.

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Rexarino
                              Maggie, although you are substantially correct, I have the memoirs of my wife s great uncle, that includes a description of a summers work for 3 older children
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jun 29, 2008
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                                Maggie, although you are substantially correct, I have the memoirs of my
                                wife's great uncle, that includes a description of a summers work for 3
                                older children and 2 adults. They dug, molded and fired clay for 5000
                                bricks, that in the end, were deemed useless as house building material.
                                Sometimes the price was very high, even when only labor was spent... The
                                solution for this family was to sell their farm and move on. It might have
                                been cheaper to import useful clay.

                                I tend to underestimate the amount that some of the pioneers moved about.
                                Mapping some ancestor's movements shows zigzag lines all over a three or
                                four state area, within a few years time.

                                rex

                                On Sun, Jun 29, 2008 at 12:01 PM, MAGGIE ALLEN <yvanwolvesbane@...>
                                wrote:

                                > Hey there, folks-
                                > These days we take for granted the wide array of materials & supplies
                                > that we have access to. In days of yor, people wouldn't generally import
                                > large weights of clay at huge expense, they'd use the best local clay they
                                > had & live with the attendant failure rates. My meaning is that it was
                                > cheaper to use local materials with only a 20% success rate, than to import
                                > a wagon load of much better clay from accross the country at the cost of a
                                > third of a year's income. (Note that these numbers are pulled from my butt,
                                > but you take my meaning.) Another thing to add to your estimation of few
                                > finds of furnacesor kilns (or molds, for that matter) is that being
                                > basically earth materials, they tend to rejoin the ground from which they
                                > came.
                                >
                                > John <elijon@...> wrote:
                                > In our local museum (Peterborough UK) there used to be an exhibit
                                > that I omitted to take a photo of,
                                > Along the banks of the river Nene nearby was the Roman settlement called
                                > Durobrivae where the pottery known now as Castorware was produced from the
                                > clay that these days is used for house bricks. This has nothing directly to
                                > do with metal as the exhibit was bronze orientated. The display was a
                                > complete Roman furnace for melting bronze that had apparently been removed
                                > from the North side of the valley so the front of this furnace would
                                > obviously then faced the prevailing winds which are from the South to South
                                > West. The furnace had been made from the clay from the surrounding area as
                                > must have been some sort of vessel in which it was melted but at the time I
                                > saw the display I was not interested in casting so took not much notice of
                                > the finer details. One day I'll return to the museum and ask if I can get to
                                > see the cabinet with this display in and take some photos but the point of
                                > the mail is that it used clay from the ground as opposed to anything fancy.
                                > Moving on a little As far as I know there are no remains of the kilns used
                                > to fire the pottery but perhaps they are of not much interest to local
                                > visitors so are not included in the displays but might be something else to
                                > make inquiries about.
                                > John.
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Yvan Wolvesbane
                                > Pacifist....with occasional lapses.
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                                >
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                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Rexarino
                                Oops, looks like I should have addressed that to Yvan, sorry! ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                Message 15 of 17 , Jun 29, 2008
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                                  Oops, looks like I should have addressed that to Yvan, sorry!

                                  On Sun, Jun 29, 2008 at 6:19 PM, Rexarino <rexarino@...> wrote:

                                  > Maggie, although you are substantially correct, snip
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > On Sun, Jun 29, 2008 at 12:01 PM, MAGGIE ALLEN <yvanwolvesbane@...>
                                  > wrote:
                                  >
                                  >> Hey there, folks-
                                  >> These days we take for granted the wide array of materials & supplies
                                  >> that we have access to. In days of yor, people wouldn't generally import
                                  >> large weights of clay at huge expense, they'd use the best local clay they
                                  >> had & live with the attendant failure rates. My meaning is that it was
                                  >> cheaper to use local materials with only a 20% success rate, than to import
                                  >> a wagon load of much better clay from accross the country at the cost of a
                                  >> third of a year's income. (Note that these numbers are pulled from my butt,
                                  >> but you take my meaning.) Another thing to add to your estimation of few
                                  >> finds of furnacesor kilns (or molds, for that matter) is that being
                                  >> basically earth materials, they tend to rejoin the ground from which they
                                  >> came.
                                  >>
                                  >> snip
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >> Yvan Wolvesbane
                                  >> Pacifist....with occasional lapses.
                                  >>
                                  >>


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Malcolm Parker-Lisberg
                                  If you contact the Museum curator (try telephone first as opposed to email) you will often find that S/He will be most co-operative and also interested in the
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Jun 30, 2008
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                                    If you contact the Museum curator (try telephone first as opposed to email) you will often find that S/He will be most co-operative and also interested in the fact you are casting also. This may result in you being taken into the bowels of the museum to see collections that are not normally available for public viewing and who knows where else it may lead.

                                    --- On Sun, 6/29/08, John <elijon@...> wrote:
                                    From: John <elijon@...>
                                    Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: Gingery Crucible Book
                                    To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Sunday, June 29, 2008, 8:11 AM











                                    In our local museum (Peterborough UK) there used to be an exhibit that I omitted to take a photo of,

                                    Along the banks of the river Nene nearby was the Roman settlement called Durobrivae where the pottery known now as Castorware was produced from the clay that these days is used for house bricks. This has nothing directly to do with metal as the exhibit was bronze orientated. The display was a complete Roman furnace for melting bronze that had apparently been removed from the North side of the valley so the front of this furnace would obviously then faced the prevailing winds which are from the South to South West. The furnace had been made from the clay from the surrounding area as must have been some sort of vessel in which it was melted but at the time I saw the display I was not interested in casting so took not much notice of the finer details. One day I'll return to the museum and ask if I can get to see the cabinet with this display in and take some photos but the point of the mail is that it used clay from the ground as opposed to
                                    anything fancy.

                                    Moving on a little As far as I know there are no remains of the kilns used to fire the pottery but perhaps they are of not much interest to local visitors so are not included in the displays but might be something else to make inquiries about.

                                    John.



                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





























                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Daniel C Postellon
                                    Some museums sponser live demonstrations, in case you want something to do.
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Jun 30, 2008
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                                      Some museums sponser live demonstrations, in case you want something to do.

                                      > If you contact the Museum curator (try telephone first as opposed to email) you will often find that S/He will be most co-operative and also interested in the fact you are casting also. This may result in you being taken into the bowels of the museum to see collections that are not normally available for public viewing and who knows where else it may lead.
                                      >
                                      > --- On Sun, 6/29/08, John <elijon@...> wrote:
                                      > From: John <elijon@...>
                                      > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Re: Gingery Crucible Book
                                      > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Date: Sunday, June 29, 2008, 8:11 AM
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > In our local museum (Peterborough UK) there used to be an exhibit that I omitted to take a photo of,
                                      >
                                      > Along the banks of the river Nene nearby was the Roman settlement called Durobrivae where the pottery known now as Castorware was produced from the clay that these days is used for house bricks. This has nothing directly to do with metal as the exhibit was bronze orientated. The display was a complete Roman furnace for melting bronze that had apparently been removed from the North side of the valley so the front of this furnace would obviously then faced the prevailing winds which are from the South to South West. The furnace had been made from the clay from the surrounding area as must have been some sort of vessel in which it was melted but at the time I saw the display I was not interested in casting so took not much notice of the finer details. One day I'll return to the museum and ask if I can get to see the cabinet with this display in and take some photos but the point of the mail is that it used clay from the ground as opposed to
                                      > anything fancy.
                                      >
                                      > Moving on a little As far as I know there are no remains of the kilns used to fire the pottery but perhaps they are of not much interest to local visitors so are not included in the displays but might be something else to make inquiries about.
                                      >
                                      > John.
                                      >
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