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free furnace shells etc.

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  • Dale Rinehart
    I don t know if this has been brought up before or not, but I see a lot of different ideas for materials for furnace shells, mullers etc. I have never seen
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 31, 2007
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      I don't know if this has been brought up before or not, but I see a lot
      of different ideas for materials for furnace shells, mullers etc. I
      have never seen anyone use what I use. Old water heaters. I have
      built both a propane fueled and an electic furnace by cutting up old
      WHs. Cheap, and easy to come by, good sizes and easily worked with if
      you have a sawsall or even a grinder to cut em open. I happen to be a
      plumber by trade, so I have no problem coming by them, but I see them
      lying in yards all the time (free). Electric units work best since you
      don't have to deal with the center tube of gas fired units. and for a
      muller that I am in the process of gathering parts for, I will have to
      get a bit of plate to weld for the bottom (WHs have a convex bottom)
      but its easier than trying to form a shell from flat plate. No need to
      cut up compressor tanks, or propane tanks. Just cut the outter shell of
      the used tank with a saw, and pry the insullation away with a claw
      hammer, clean up with a angle grinder mounted wire brush, and in no
      time, you have a great shell. Just my .02 worth

      -Herch
    • Chris Bailey
      Hey! You know, that s a WONDERFUL idea! Of course my furnace is made from the same thing! Don t forget all the brass and zinc parts that are attached
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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        Hey! You know, that's a WONDERFUL idea! Of course my furnace is made
        from the same thing! <GRIN>

        Don't forget all the brass and zinc parts that are attached to the
        furnace as well. Also, all the steel and copper pipe has numerous
        possibilities too!

        Chris


        Dale Rinehart wrote:
        >
        > I don't know if this has been brought up before or not, but I see a lot
        > of different ideas for materials for furnace shells, mullers etc. I
        > have never seen anyone use what I use. Old water heaters. I have
        > built both a propane fueled and an electic furnace by cutting up old
        > WHs. Cheap, and easy to come by, good sizes and easily worked with if
        > you have a sawsall or even a grinder to cut em open. I happen to be a
        > plumber by trade, so I have no problem coming by them, but I see them
        > lying in yards all the time (free). Electric units work best since you
        > don't have to deal with the center tube of gas fired units. and for a
        > muller that I am in the process of gathering parts for, I will have to
        > get a bit of plate to weld for the bottom (WHs have a convex bottom)
        > but its easier than trying to form a shell from flat plate. No need to
        > cut up compressor tanks, or propane tanks. Just cut the outter shell of
        > the used tank with a saw, and pry the insullation away with a claw
        > hammer, clean up with a angle grinder mounted wire brush, and in no
        > time, you have a great shell. Just my .02 worth
        >
        > -Herch
        >
        >
      • Jaap A
        Chris, Dale, Please show the group some pictures of your creations... -Jaap- ... made ... a lot ... I ... old ... with if ... be a ... them ... since you ...
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 2, 2007
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          Chris, Dale,

          Please show the group some pictures of your creations...

          -Jaap-

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Chris Bailey <cbailey73160@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hey! You know, that's a WONDERFUL idea! Of course my furnace is
          made
          > from the same thing! <GRIN>
          >
          > Don't forget all the brass and zinc parts that are attached to the
          > furnace as well. Also, all the steel and copper pipe has numerous
          > possibilities too!
          >
          > Chris
          >
          >
          > Dale Rinehart wrote:
          > >
          > > I don't know if this has been brought up before or not, but I see
          a lot
          > > of different ideas for materials for furnace shells, mullers etc.
          I
          > > have never seen anyone use what I use. Old water heaters. I have
          > > built both a propane fueled and an electic furnace by cutting up
          old
          > > WHs. Cheap, and easy to come by, good sizes and easily worked
          with if
          > > you have a sawsall or even a grinder to cut em open. I happen to
          be a
          > > plumber by trade, so I have no problem coming by them, but I see
          them
          > > lying in yards all the time (free). Electric units work best
          since you
          > > don't have to deal with the center tube of gas fired units. and
          for a
          > > muller that I am in the process of gathering parts for, I will
          have to
          > > get a bit of plate to weld for the bottom (WHs have a convex
          bottom)
          > > but its easier than trying to form a shell from flat plate. No
          need to
          > > cut up compressor tanks, or propane tanks. Just cut the outter
          shell of
          > > the used tank with a saw, and pry the insullation away with a claw
          > > hammer, clean up with a angle grinder mounted wire brush, and in
          no
          > > time, you have a great shell. Just my .02 worth
          > >
          > > -Herch
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Ken Wilson
          ... One of my furnaces is made from the top half of a discarded water heater. -Ken
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 2, 2007
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            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Dale Rinehart" <dalerinehart@...>
            wrote:

            > I
            > have never seen anyone use what I use. Old water heaters.

            One of my furnaces is made from the top half of a discarded water heater.
            -Ken
          • Aaron Pasteris
            For a smaller furnace, the disposable helium tanks that come in the birthday party ballon kits. They are thinner than propane tanks but won t light up your
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 2, 2007
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              For a smaller furnace, the disposable helium tanks that come in the birthday
              party ballon kits. They are thinner than propane tanks but won't light up
              your life when you cut them open.

              Aaron


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Dale Rinehart" <dalerinehart@...>
              To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 10:04 PM
              Subject: [hobbicast] free furnace shells etc.


              > I don't know if this has been brought up before or not, but I see a lot
              > of different ideas for materials for furnace shells, mullers etc. I
              > have never seen anyone use what I use. Old water heaters. I have
              > built both a propane fueled and an electic furnace by cutting up old
              > WHs. Cheap, and easy to come by, good sizes and easily worked with if
              > you have a sawsall or even a grinder to cut em open. I happen to be a
              > plumber by trade, so I have no problem coming by them, but I see them
              > lying in yards all the time (free). Electric units work best since you
              > don't have to deal with the center tube of gas fired units. and for a
              > muller that I am in the process of gathering parts for, I will have to
              > get a bit of plate to weld for the bottom (WHs have a convex bottom)
              > but its easier than trying to form a shell from flat plate. No need to
              > cut up compressor tanks, or propane tanks. Just cut the outter shell of
              > the used tank with a saw, and pry the insullation away with a claw
              > hammer, clean up with a angle grinder mounted wire brush, and in no
              > time, you have a great shell. Just my .02 worth
              >
              > -Herch
              >
              >
              >
              > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
              > this list does not accept attachments.
              >
              > Files area and list services are at:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
              >
              > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
              > check out these two affiliated sites:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
              >
              > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
              > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
              >
              > List Owner:
              > owly@...
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Chris Bailey
              That would mean I d have to clean up all the junk that s piled around it right now and maybe even PAINT the thing! Honestly, I do need to take some
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 2, 2007
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                That would mean I'd have to clean up all the junk that's piled around it
                right now and maybe even PAINT the thing! <GRIN>

                Honestly, I do need to take some pics and then post 'em up here!

                Chris


                Jaap A wrote:
                >
                > Chris, Dale,
                >
                > Please show the group some pictures of your creations...
                >
                > -Jaap-
                >
                > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <mailto:hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>,
                > Chris Bailey <cbailey73160@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > Hey! You know, that's a WONDERFUL idea! Of course my furnace is
                > made
                > > from the same thing! <GRIN>
                > >
                > > Don't forget all the brass and zinc parts that are attached to the
                > > furnace as well. Also, all the steel and copper pipe has numerous
                > > possibilities too!
                > >
                > > Chris
                > >
                > >
                > > Dale Rinehart wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I don't know if this has been brought up before or not, but I see
                > a lot
                > > > of different ideas for materials for furnace shells, mullers etc.
                > I
                > > > have never seen anyone use what I use. Old water heaters. I have
                > > > built both a propane fueled and an electic furnace by cutting up
                > old
                > > > WHs. Cheap, and easy to come by, good sizes and easily worked
                > with if
                > > > you have a sawsall or even a grinder to cut em open. I happen to
                > be a
                > > > plumber by trade, so I have no problem coming by them, but I see
                > them
                > > > lying in yards all the time (free). Electric units work best
                > since you
                > > > don't have to deal with the center tube of gas fired units. and
                > for a
                > > > muller that I am in the process of gathering parts for, I will
                > have to
                > > > get a bit of plate to weld for the bottom (WHs have a convex
                > bottom)
                > > > but its easier than trying to form a shell from flat plate. No
                > need to
                > > > cut up compressor tanks, or propane tanks. Just cut the outter
                > shell of
                > > > the used tank with a saw, and pry the insullation away with a claw
                > > > hammer, clean up with a angle grinder mounted wire brush, and in
                > no
                > > > time, you have a great shell. Just my .02 worth
                > > >
                > > > -Herch
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >
              • Jeshua Lacock
                ... Its pretty simple, just fill the Propane tank with water unless you have a death wish. I use the propane tanks for my oil burners, and I do like the
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 2, 2007
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                  On Aug 2, 2007, at 7:29 PM, Aaron Pasteris wrote:

                  > For a smaller furnace, the disposable helium tanks that come in the
                  > birthday
                  > party ballon kits. They are thinner than propane tanks but won't
                  > light up
                  > your life when you cut them open.

                  Its pretty simple, just fill the Propane tank with water unless you
                  have a death wish.

                  I use the propane tanks for my oil burners, and I do like the
                  thickness of them for that purpose.


                  Cheers,

                  Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                  <http://OpenOSX.com>
                  phone: 877.240.1364
                • Daniel C Postellon
                  I just got one of those 5-liter aluminum beer kegs (empty). Has anyone out there used one of these for a small furnace, or on the other hand, how do they melt
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 3, 2007
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                    I just got one of those 5-liter aluminum beer kegs (empty). Has anyone out
                    there used one of these for a small furnace, or on the other hand, how do
                    they melt as a source of metal? Dan P.

                    > For a smaller furnace, the disposable helium tanks that come in the birthday
                    > party ballon kits. They are thinner than propane tanks but won't light up
                    > your life when you cut them open.
                    >
                    > Aaron
                    >
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: "Dale Rinehart" <dalerinehart@...>
                    > To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 10:04 PM
                    > Subject: [hobbicast] free furnace shells etc.
                    >
                    >
                    >> I don't know if this has been brought up before or not, but I see a lot
                    >> of different ideas for materials for furnace shells, mullers etc. I
                    >> have never seen anyone use what I use. Old water heaters. I have
                    >> built both a propane fueled and an electic furnace by cutting up old
                    >> WHs. Cheap, and easy to come by, good sizes and easily worked with if
                    >> you have a sawsall or even a grinder to cut em open. I happen to be a
                    >> plumber by trade, so I have no problem coming by them, but I see them
                    >> lying in yards all the time (free). Electric units work best since you
                    >> don't have to deal with the center tube of gas fired units. and for a
                    >> muller that I am in the process of gathering parts for, I will have to
                    >> get a bit of plate to weld for the bottom (WHs have a convex bottom)
                    >> but its easier than trying to form a shell from flat plate. No need to
                    >> cut up compressor tanks, or propane tanks. Just cut the outter shell of
                    >> the used tank with a saw, and pry the insullation away with a claw
                    >> hammer, clean up with a angle grinder mounted wire brush, and in no
                    >> time, you have a great shell. Just my .02 worth
                    >>
                    >> -Herch
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                    >> this list does not accept attachments.
                    >>
                    >> Files area and list services are at:
                    >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                    >>
                    >> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                    >> check out these two affiliated sites:
                    >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                    >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                    >>
                    >> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                    >> http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                    >>
                    >> List Owner:
                    >> owly@...
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                  • Jeshua Lacock
                    (sent this a couple days ago - but it didn t make it to the list) ... Greetings, Yes salvaged shells take on many shapes and sizes. A 55 gallon drum proved to
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 3, 2007
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                      (sent this a couple days ago - but it didn't make it to the list)


                      On Jul 31, 2007, at 8:04 PM, Dale Rinehart wrote:

                      > No need to
                      > cut up compressor tanks, or propane tanks. Just cut the outter
                      > shell of
                      > the used tank with a saw, and pry the insullation away with a claw
                      > hammer, clean up with a angle grinder mounted wire brush, and in no
                      > time, you have a great shell. Just my .02 worth

                      Greetings,

                      Yes salvaged shells take on many shapes and sizes.

                      A 55 gallon drum proved to be the perfect size for my 100# crucible
                      and ~2.5" of refractory.

                      I was able to cut through it in a couple of minutes with a pair of
                      tin snips and what was left turned out to be a ideal size lid..

                      Now if I could only find fiber blankets and castable refractory at
                      the junk yard!


                      Cheers,

                      Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                      <http://OpenOSX.com>
                      phone: 877.240.1364
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