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Re: bentone

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  • Lyle
    They should have had an exhaust shroud. (of course I should have one too...) But if that s the only reason, why not just add the smokeless oil to the regular
    Message 1 of 30 , Jun 5, 2007
      They should have had an exhaust shroud. (of course I should have one
      too...)
      But if that's the only reason, why not just add the smokeless oil to
      the regular petrobond? I dunno, there's more than one way to skin a
      cat. I posted that iron oxide recipe a few years ago and someone said
      it wouldn't work so I guess we all have different opinions and
      experiences.
      LL

      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "JohnW" <john.walker@...> wrote:
      >
      > Lyle
      > It was mentioned in one of Tom Cobett's emails. Apparently the
      OSHA
      > types visited the university and didn't like all the smoke from the
      > petrobond. That's what got Tom to develop the kbond recipe.
      >
      > The kbond smokeless oil might not give off visible smoke but that
      > doesn't mean it isn't giving off other stuff that may or may not be
      > harmful.
      >
      > JohnW
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Lyle" <creepinogie@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Why is it less carcinogenic?
      > > LL
      > >
      > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On Jun 5, 2007, at 6:28 AM, Gary Reese wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > I'm under the impression petrobond and k bond are two
      different
      > > > > things.
      > > >
      > > > Gary,
      > > >
      > > > Petrobound is a trademarked product and k-bond is supposedly a
      > > less
      > > > potentially carcinogenic home made version of oil bonded sand
      > > > formulated at Kent Univeristy - hence the K.
      > > >
      > > > Read:
      > > > <http://www3.telus.net/public/aschoepp/sand.html>
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Regards,
      > > >
      > > > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
      > > > <http://OpenOSX.com>
      > > > phone: 877.240.1364
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Jeshua Lacock
      ... Lyle, If you are curious in finding our more I suggest that you can click on the link that I provided - I am not going to regurgitate an explanation that
      Message 2 of 30 , Jun 5, 2007
        On Jun 5, 2007, at 2:23 PM, Lyle wrote:

        > Why is it less carcinogenic?
        > LL
        >
        > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > On Jun 5, 2007, at 6:28 AM, Gary Reese wrote:
        > >
        > > > I'm under the impression petrobond and k bond are two different
        > > > things.
        > >
        > > Gary,
        > >
        > > Petrobound is a trademarked product and k-bond is supposedly a
        > less
        > > potentially carcinogenic home made version of oil bonded sand
        > > formulated at Kent Univeristy - hence the K.
        > >
        > > Read:
        > > <http://www3.telus.net/public/aschoepp/sand.html>

        Lyle,

        If you are curious in finding our more I suggest that you can click
        on the link that I provided - I am not going to regurgitate an
        explanation that is already written...


        Regards,

        Jeshua Lacock, Owner
        <http://OpenOSX.com>
        phone: 877.240.1364
      • Gary Reese
        The Bentone Ray is getting is from last years order. My supplyer informs me the new price is not less than $3.56 a pound. So you mite want to consider other
        Message 3 of 30 , Jun 6, 2007
          The Bentone Ray is getting is from last years order. My supplyer
          informs me the new price is not less than $3.56 a pound. So you mite
          want to consider other choices.

          I get the Bentone 34 from Elementis and the propylene carbonate from
          Huntsman.

          Myself, I use green sand I got from a foundry for free.

          GaryR
        • Stone Tool
          Bentone seems to be a universal problem for people seeking to make Kbond..... Green sand of course in the obvious alternative as is sodium silicate sand,
          Message 4 of 30 , Jun 6, 2007
            Bentone seems to be a universal problem for people seeking to make
            Kbond..... Green sand of course in the obvious alternative as is
            sodium silicate sand, and Col Croucher describes making an alternative
            to Kbond for this exact reason at this URL:
            http://www.hal-pc.org/~lwhill/sandsystems.html

            An in depth examination of the chemistry of the oil bond sand and how it
            works, what alternative chemistries can accomplish the same ends, etc...
            is probably in order. I've found that a look back in history often
            reveals technology that has been more or less forgotten. Then there is
            resin bonded sand........ there may be a simple and inexpensive agent
            out there that nobody has tried such as for example a thinned weldwood
            brown glue??? something that can be cheaply and easily mixed from
            universally available products. Available oils have many different
            characters, and some may react in desirable ways when in the presence of
            various other components...... note how linseed oil jells.... what
            makes it jell? also canola oil is extremely sticky...... An interesting
            aside here....... many vegetable oils will jell when they come in
            contact with acids such as ordinary vinegar for example.......
            Somewhere in our everyday experience there are probably combinations
            that would work very well. As an example people talk about "smokeless
            oils"....... and in fact many synthetic oils are so immune to burning
            that they create problems in systems designed to burn waste oil..........
            We have literally thousands of common products for lubrication,
            cleaning, cooking, finishing, construction, etc.... and it is quite
            probable that there is a combination that is made to order if we examine
            the how and why of the generally accepted components. I can't see where
            this really should be a big problem. It is a function of getting the
            sand particles to adhere to each other well enough that particles are
            not falling out of the drag when we split a mold, to have some breathing
            ability, to not gas off or burn excessively, and to not be excessively
            sticky.

            H.W.

            Jeshua Lacock wrote:
            > On Jun 5, 2007, at 6:40 AM, Stone Tool wrote:
            >
            >> Perhaps it's time to take a look at alternative recipes that don't
            >> include hard to find materials.......
            >
            > Such as?
            >
            >
            > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
            > <http://OpenOSX.com>
            > phone: 877.240.1364
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
            > this list does not accept attachments.
            >
            > Files area and list services are at:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
            >
            > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
            > check out these two affiliated sites:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
            >
            > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
            > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
            >
            > List Owner:
            > owly@...
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Lyle
            Maybe I m stepping out on a limb here. But it s been my experience that any type of alchohol can be used as the catalist. I THINK it s not so much chemical but
            Message 5 of 30 , Jun 6, 2007
              Maybe I'm stepping out on a limb here. But it's been my experience
              that any type of alchohol can be used as the catalist. I THINK it's
              not so much chemical but more of a mechanical catalist that reduces
              the surface tension of the oil and makes the sand more easily coated
              bofore the catalist evaporates. Am I wrong? I could be as there seems
              to be some pretty specific components regarding the alchohol. But
              I've used everything from grain alcholol and antifreeze to rubbing
              alchohol.
              LL

              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
              >
              > Bentone seems to be a universal problem for people seeking to make
              > Kbond..... Green sand of course in the obvious alternative as is
              > sodium silicate sand, and Col Croucher describes making an
              alternative
              > to Kbond for this exact reason at this URL:
              > http://www.hal-pc.org/~lwhill/sandsystems.html
              >
              > An in depth examination of the chemistry of the oil bond sand and
              how it
              > works, what alternative chemistries can accomplish the same ends,
              etc...
              > is probably in order. I've found that a look back in history
              often
              > reveals technology that has been more or less forgotten. Then
              there is
              > resin bonded sand........ there may be a simple and inexpensive
              agent
              > out there that nobody has tried such as for example a thinned
              weldwood
              > brown glue??? something that can be cheaply and easily mixed from
              > universally available products. Available oils have many different
              > characters, and some may react in desirable ways when in the
              presence of
              > various other components...... note how linseed oil jells.... what
              > makes it jell? also canola oil is extremely sticky...... An
              interesting
              > aside here....... many vegetable oils will jell when they come in
              > contact with acids such as ordinary vinegar for example.......
              > Somewhere in our everyday experience there are probably combinations
              > that would work very well. As an example people talk
              about "smokeless
              > oils"....... and in fact many synthetic oils are so immune to
              burning
              > that they create problems in systems designed to burn waste
              oil..........
              > We have literally thousands of common products for
              lubrication,
              > cleaning, cooking, finishing, construction, etc.... and it is quite
              > probable that there is a combination that is made to order if we
              examine
              > the how and why of the generally accepted components. I can't see
              where
              > this really should be a big problem. It is a function of getting
              the
              > sand particles to adhere to each other well enough that particles
              are
              > not falling out of the drag when we split a mold, to have some
              breathing
              > ability, to not gas off or burn excessively, and to not be
              excessively
              > sticky.
              >
              > H.W.
              >
              > Jeshua Lacock wrote:
              > > On Jun 5, 2007, at 6:40 AM, Stone Tool wrote:
              > >
              > >> Perhaps it's time to take a look at alternative recipes that
              don't
              > >> include hard to find materials.......
              > >
              > > Such as?
              > >
              > >
              > > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
              > > <http://OpenOSX.com>
              > > phone: 877.240.1364
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
              > > this list does not accept attachments.
              > >
              > > Files area and list services are at:
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
              > >
              > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
              > > check out these two affiliated sites:
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
              > >
              > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
              > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
              > >
              > > List Owner:
              > > owly@...
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
            • Daniel C Postellon
              Actually, some auto companies are using animal byproducts to hold sand together, basicly using what you get from the glue factory.
              Message 6 of 30 , Jun 6, 2007
                Actually, some auto companies are using "animal byproducts" to hold sand
                together, basicly using what you get from the glue factory.
                > Bentone seems to be a universal problem for people seeking to make
                > Kbond..... Green sand of course in the obvious alternative as is
                > sodium silicate sand, and Col Croucher describes making an alternative
                > to Kbond for this exact reason at this URL:
                > http://www.hal-pc.org/~lwhill/sandsystems.html
                >
                > An in depth examination of the chemistry of the oil bond sand and how it
                > works, what alternative chemistries can accomplish the same ends, etc...
                > is probably in order. I've found that a look back in history often
                > reveals technology that has been more or less forgotten. Then there is
                > resin bonded sand........ there may be a simple and inexpensive agent
                > out there that nobody has tried such as for example a thinned weldwood
                > brown glue??? something that can be cheaply and easily mixed from
                > universally available products. Available oils have many different
                > characters, and some may react in desirable ways when in the presence of
                > various other components...... note how linseed oil jells.... what
                > makes it jell? also canola oil is extremely sticky...... An interesting
                > aside here....... many vegetable oils will jell when they come in
                > contact with acids such as ordinary vinegar for example.......
                > Somewhere in our everyday experience there are probably combinations
                > that would work very well. As an example people talk about "smokeless
                > oils"....... and in fact many synthetic oils are so immune to burning
                > that they create problems in systems designed to burn waste oil..........
                > We have literally thousands of common products for lubrication,
                > cleaning, cooking, finishing, construction, etc.... and it is quite
                > probable that there is a combination that is made to order if we examine
                > the how and why of the generally accepted components. I can't see where
                > this really should be a big problem. It is a function of getting the
                > sand particles to adhere to each other well enough that particles are
                > not falling out of the drag when we split a mold, to have some breathing
                > ability, to not gas off or burn excessively, and to not be excessively
                > sticky.
                >
                > H.W.
                >
                > Jeshua Lacock wrote:
                >> On Jun 5, 2007, at 6:40 AM, Stone Tool wrote:
                >>
                >>> Perhaps it's time to take a look at alternative recipes that don't
                >>> include hard to find materials.......
                >>
                >> Such as?
                >>
                >>
                >> Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                >> <http://OpenOSX.com>
                >> phone: 877.240.1364
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                >> this list does not accept attachments.
                >>
                >> Files area and list services are at:
                >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                >>
                >> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                >> check out these two affiliated sites:
                >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                >>
                >> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                >> http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                >>
                >> List Owner:
                >> owly@...
                >>
                >>
                >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >
                >
                >
              • Dan Brewer
                The folk that make SPAM also make a product to bind sand. They will not sell it in less than train car lots, so that leaves most of us out. I hear that it
                Message 7 of 30 , Jun 6, 2007
                  The folk that make SPAM also make a product to bind sand. They will not sell
                  it in less than train car lots, so that leaves most of us out. I hear that
                  it smells like cooking spam when you pour.

                  Dan in Auburn



                  _____

                  From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  Of Daniel C Postellon
                  Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2007 4:18 PM
                  To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [hobbicast] Re: bentone



                  Actually, some auto companies are using "animal byproducts" to hold sand
                  together, basicly using what you get from the glue factory.
                  > Bentone seems to be a universal problem for people seeking to make
                  > Kbond..... Green sand of course in the obvious alternative as is
                  > sodium silicate sand, and Col Croucher describes making an alternative
                  > to Kbond for this exact reason at this URL:
                  > http://www.hal- <http://www.hal-pc.org/~lwhill/sandsystems.html>
                  pc.org/~lwhill/sandsystems.html
                  >
                  > An in depth examination of the chemistry of the oil bond sand and how it
                  > works, what alternative chemistries can accomplish the same ends, etc...
                  > is probably in order. I've found that a look back in history often
                  > reveals technology that has been more or less forgotten. Then there is
                  > resin bonded sand........ there may be a simple and inexpensive agent
                  > out there that nobody has tried such as for example a thinned weldwood
                  > brown glue??? something that can be cheaply and easily mixed from
                  > universally available products. Available oils have many different
                  > characters, and some may react in desirable ways when in the presence of
                  > various other components...... note how linseed oil jells.... what
                  > makes it jell? also canola oil is extremely sticky...... An interesting
                  > aside here....... many vegetable oils will jell when they come in
                  > contact with acids such as ordinary vinegar for example.......
                  > Somewhere in our everyday experience there are probably combinations
                  > that would work very well. As an example people talk about "smokeless
                  > oils"....... and in fact many synthetic oils are so immune to burning
                  > that they create problems in systems designed to burn waste oil..........
                  > We have literally thousands of common products for lubrication,
                  > cleaning, cooking, finishing, construction, etc.... and it is quite
                  > probable that there is a combination that is made to order if we examine
                  > the how and why of the generally accepted components. I can't see where
                  > this really should be a big problem. It is a function of getting the
                  > sand particles to adhere to each other well enough that particles are
                  > not falling out of the drag when we split a mold, to have some breathing
                  > ability, to not gas off or burn excessively, and to not be excessively
                  > sticky.
                  >
                  > H.W.
                  >
                  > Jeshua Lacock wrote:
                  >> On Jun 5, 2007, at 6:40 AM, Stone Tool wrote:
                  >>
                  >>> Perhaps it's time to take a look at alternative recipes that don't
                  >>> include hard to find materials.......
                  >>
                  >> Such as?
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                  >> <http://OpenOSX. <http://OpenOSX.com> com>
                  >> phone: 877.240.1364
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                  >> this list does not accept attachments.
                  >>
                  >> Files area and list services are at:
                  >> http://groups. <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast>
                  yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                  >>
                  >> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                  >> check out these two affiliated sites:
                  >> http://groups. <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs>
                  yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                  >> http://groups. <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1>
                  yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                  >>
                  >> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                  >> http://budgetcastin <http://budgetcastingsupply.com/> gsupply.com/
                  >>
                  >> List Owner:
                  >> owly@ttc-cmc. <mailto:owly%40ttc-cmc.net> net
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >







                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Stone Tool
                  Lyle: This is exactly the kind of experimentation we need...... products like ordinary air brake antifreeze (methanol) or automotive antifreeze (ethylene
                  Message 8 of 30 , Jun 6, 2007
                    Lyle:
                    This is exactly the kind of experimentation we need...... products like
                    ordinary air brake antifreeze (methanol) or automotive antifreeze
                    (ethylene glycol) are very readily available as are two cycle oils, and
                    synthetics. The trick here is to find things anybody can find locally
                    and easily.

                    H.W.

                    Lyle wrote:
                    > Maybe I'm stepping out on a limb here. But it's been my experience
                    > that any type of alchohol can be used as the catalist. I THINK it's
                    > not so much chemical but more of a mechanical catalist that reduces
                    > the surface tension of the oil and makes the sand more easily coated
                    > bofore the catalist evaporates. Am I wrong? I could be as there seems
                    > to be some pretty specific components regarding the alchohol. But
                    > I've used everything from grain alcholol and antifreeze to rubbing
                    > alchohol.
                    > LL
                    >
                    > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                    >> Bentone seems to be a universal problem for people seeking to make
                    >> Kbond..... Green sand of course in the obvious alternative as is
                    >> sodium silicate sand, and Col Croucher describes making an
                    > alternative
                    >> to Kbond for this exact reason at this URL:
                    >> http://www.hal-pc.org/~lwhill/sandsystems.html
                    >>
                    >> An in depth examination of the chemistry of the oil bond sand and
                    > how it
                    >> works, what alternative chemistries can accomplish the same ends,
                    > etc...
                    >> is probably in order. I've found that a look back in history
                    > often
                    >> reveals technology that has been more or less forgotten. Then
                    > there is
                    >> resin bonded sand........ there may be a simple and inexpensive
                    > agent
                    >> out there that nobody has tried such as for example a thinned
                    > weldwood
                    >> brown glue??? something that can be cheaply and easily mixed from
                    >> universally available products. Available oils have many different
                    >> characters, and some may react in desirable ways when in the
                    > presence of
                    >> various other components...... note how linseed oil jells.... what
                    >> makes it jell? also canola oil is extremely sticky...... An
                    > interesting
                    >> aside here....... many vegetable oils will jell when they come in
                    >> contact with acids such as ordinary vinegar for example.......
                    >> Somewhere in our everyday experience there are probably combinations
                    >> that would work very well. As an example people talk
                    > about "smokeless
                    >> oils"....... and in fact many synthetic oils are so immune to
                    > burning
                    >> that they create problems in systems designed to burn waste
                    > oil..........
                    >> We have literally thousands of common products for
                    > lubrication,
                    >> cleaning, cooking, finishing, construction, etc.... and it is quite
                    >> probable that there is a combination that is made to order if we
                    > examine
                    >> the how and why of the generally accepted components. I can't see
                    > where
                    >> this really should be a big problem. It is a function of getting
                    > the
                    >> sand particles to adhere to each other well enough that particles
                    > are
                    >> not falling out of the drag when we split a mold, to have some
                    > breathing
                    >> ability, to not gas off or burn excessively, and to not be
                    > excessively
                    >> sticky.
                    >>
                    >> H.W.
                    >>
                    >> Jeshua Lacock wrote:
                    >>> On Jun 5, 2007, at 6:40 AM, Stone Tool wrote:
                    >>>
                    >>>> Perhaps it's time to take a look at alternative recipes that
                    > don't
                    >>>> include hard to find materials.......
                    >>> Such as?
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                    >>> <http://OpenOSX.com>
                    >>> phone: 877.240.1364
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                    >>> this list does not accept attachments.
                    >>>
                    >>> Files area and list services are at:
                    >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                    >>>
                    >>> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                    >>> check out these two affiliated sites:
                    >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                    >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                    >>>
                    >>> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                    >>> http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                    >>>
                    >>> List Owner:
                    >>> owly@...
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                    > this list does not accept attachments.
                    >
                    > Files area and list services are at:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                    >
                    > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                    > check out these two affiliated sites:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                    >
                    > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                    > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                    >
                    > List Owner:
                    > owly@...
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • hillwizard2@aol.com
                    In a message dated 6/6/2007 4:18:47 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, postello@msu.edu writes: Actually, some auto companies are using animal byproducts to hold
                    Message 9 of 30 , Jun 6, 2007
                      In a message dated 6/6/2007 4:18:47 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                      postello@... writes:

                      Actually, some auto companies are using "animal byproducts" to hold sand
                      together, basicly using what you get from the glue factory.
                      > Bentone seems to be a universal problem for people seeking to make
                      > Kbond..... Green sand of course in the obvious alternative as is
                      > sodium silicate sand, and Col Croucher describes making an alternative
                      > to Kbond for this exact reason at this URL:




                      I would like to say something about this. because different people are
                      making different things different system work better for different companies.
                      Green sand is the cheapest to use, and because there no environmental problems
                      with it disposal It is preferred For cores sodium silicate is best for the
                      same reason, but it is also the hardest to shake out.
                      for the commercial operation increasing your output by 5 percent can make
                      the difference between profit and lose. I would think the hobby caster can
                      spend a little more time with out causing a problem. If you need binders for
                      green sand anyone can get potters clay and flour. They work
                      For cores flour and molasses or sodium silicate is available everywhere. if
                      you are at the point there they will not do the job and you can't find
                      something better tell the list where you are and what you need and someone will be
                      able to tell you where to get it

                      Mike the Hillwizard

                      Never miss an opportunity to do a good deed



                      ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Stone Tool
                      Mike: You will never sell people who prefer petrobond / kbond on green sand..... It s great stuff, low maintenance, easy to use, etc..... H.W.
                      Message 10 of 30 , Jun 6, 2007
                        Mike:
                        You will never sell people who prefer petrobond / kbond on green
                        sand..... It's great stuff, low maintenance, easy to use, etc.....

                        H.W.

                        hillwizard2@... wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > In a message dated 6/6/2007 4:18:47 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                        > postello@... writes:
                        >
                        > Actually, some auto companies are using "animal byproducts" to hold sand
                        > together, basicly using what you get from the glue factory.
                        >> Bentone seems to be a universal problem for people seeking to make
                        >> Kbond..... Green sand of course in the obvious alternative as is
                        >> sodium silicate sand, and Col Croucher describes making an alternative
                        >> to Kbond for this exact reason at this URL:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I would like to say something about this. because different people are
                        > making different things different system work better for different companies.
                        > Green sand is the cheapest to use, and because there no environmental problems
                        > with it disposal It is preferred For cores sodium silicate is best for the
                        > same reason, but it is also the hardest to shake out.
                        > for the commercial operation increasing your output by 5 percent can make
                        > the difference between profit and lose. I would think the hobby caster can
                        > spend a little more time with out causing a problem. If you need binders for
                        > green sand anyone can get potters clay and flour. They work
                        > For cores flour and molasses or sodium silicate is available everywhere. if
                        > you are at the point there they will not do the job and you can't find
                        > something better tell the list where you are and what you need and someone will be
                        > able to tell you where to get it
                        >
                        > Mike the Hillwizard
                        >
                        > Never miss an opportunity to do a good deed
                        >
                        >
                        >
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                      • John Delaney
                        There used to be a commercial fry oil called Frymax. It lasted longer than vegetable oils and had a thick consistency when at room temperature. It or something
                        Message 11 of 30 , Jun 7, 2007
                          There used to be a commercial fry oil called Frymax. It lasted longer than
                          vegetable oils and had a thick consistency when at room temperature. It or
                          something like it is probably available at a restaurant supply. Might be
                          worth a trial. It had a low affinity for water as I recall. -jd


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • jesse Brennan
                          That sounds like one of the No_No partially hydrogenated fats and oils. The deep fat places loved them but no more! If they use them eat someplace else.
                          Message 12 of 30 , Jun 7, 2007
                            That sounds like one of the No_No partially hydrogenated fats and
                            oils. The deep fat places loved them but no more!
                            If they use them eat someplace else.
                            jesse
                            On Jun 7, 2007, at 11:27 AM, John Delaney wrote:

                            There used to be a commercial fry oil called Frymax. It lasted longer
                            than
                            vegetable oils and had a thick consistency when at room temperature.
                            It or
                            something like it is probably available at a restaurant supply. Might be
                            worth a trial. It had a low affinity for water as I recall. -jd

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Daniel C Postellon
                            Sounds like palm oil, or other tropical oils. Was it red and smelly?
                            Message 13 of 30 , Jun 7, 2007
                              Sounds like palm oil, or other tropical oils. Was it red and smelly?

                              > There used to be a commercial fry oil called Frymax. It lasted longer than
                              > vegetable oils and had a thick consistency when at room temperature. It or
                              > something like it is probably available at a restaurant supply. Might be
                              > worth a trial. It had a low affinity for water as I recall. -jd
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • John Delaney
                              No, Frymax was white at room temp and clear at frying temp when fresh, no smell until it had been used for a long time. I am totally sure it is or was one of
                              Message 14 of 30 , Jun 8, 2007
                                No, Frymax was white at room temp and clear at frying temp when fresh, no
                                smell until it had been used for a long time. I am totally sure it is or was
                                one of the bad fatty cooking oils. -jd


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Daniel C Postellon
                                You are probably right. It sounds like a highly saturated fat. Tropical oils are this way naturally, or you can hydrogenate oils and get highly saturated
                                Message 15 of 30 , Jun 8, 2007
                                  You are probably right. It sounds like a highly saturated fat. Tropical
                                  oils are this way naturally, or you can hydrogenate oils and get highly
                                  saturated fats, and lots if trans fats as well.

                                  > No, Frymax was white at room temp and clear at frying temp when fresh, no
                                  > smell until it had been used for a long time. I am totally sure it is or was
                                  > one of the bad fatty cooking oils. -jd
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
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