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Re: [hobbicast] Lost foam adhesive

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  • Jeshua Lacock
    ... I like to use needles (as nails). It does not introduce any impurities (like glue can) and only reinforces your final casting.... Or, I sometimes I smear
    Message 1 of 16 , May 18, 2007
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      On May 18, 2007, at 2:08 PM, rogers92026 wrote:

      > My question for the group: what are some acceptable adhesives to use
      > to glue various piece of styrofoam together (such as if I'm stacking
      > several layers) that will burn-out okay in the lost-foam process ?


      I like to use needles (as nails). It does not introduce any
      impurities (like glue can) and only reinforces your final casting....

      Or, I sometimes I smear on a little bit of wax on each piece then
      heat and mend them together.

      If you use hot glue, make sure to use it very sparingly and in very
      thin points. I have had some problems with hot glue when it is too
      thick (it vaporizes much slower than the foam. Whenever possible the
      foam should be surface to surface with foam, use the adhesive
      sparingly around the perimeter...


      Cheers,

      Jeshua Lacock, Owner
      <http://OpenOSX.com>
      phone: 877.240.1364
    • hillwizard2@aol.com
      Hi Bruce I use Elmer s white glue. Most of the time I put the pieces together and just glue on the edges Mike the Hillwizard In a message dated 5/18/2007
      Message 2 of 16 , May 18, 2007
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        Hi Bruce

        I use Elmer's white glue. Most of the time I put the pieces together and
        just glue on the edges



        Mike the Hillwizard




        In a message dated 5/18/2007 3:32:18 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
        brogers9941@... writes:

        My question for the group: what are some acceptable adhesives to use
        to glue various piece of styrofoam together (such as if I'm stacking
        several layers) that will burn-out okay in the lost-foam process ?

        Bruce







        ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jack
        Almost any white craft (pva) glue is just fine. DON T use white or yellow cross-linked woodworking glues as they vaporize much slower than foam. Mostly I use
        Message 3 of 16 , May 18, 2007
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          Almost any white craft (pva) glue is just fine.

          DON'T use white or yellow 'cross-linked' woodworking glues as they
          vaporize much slower than foam.

          Mostly I use clear office gum. I also use the office gum for 'glue
          chucking' pieces of foam onto a face plate for turning or milling -
          use mounted abrasives (wheels, balls, cones etc) instead of end mills
          Jack




          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, hillwizard2@... wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi Bruce
          >
          > I use Elmer's white glue. Most of the time I put the pieces
          together and
          > just glue on the edges
          >
          >
          >
          > Mike the Hillwizard
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > In a message dated 5/18/2007 3:32:18 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
          > brogers9941@... writes:
          >
          > My question for the group: what are some acceptable adhesives to
          use
          > to glue various piece of styrofoam together (such as if I'm
          stacking
          > several layers) that will burn-out okay in the lost-foam process ?
          >
          > Bruce
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ************************************** See what's free at
          http://www.aol.com
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Daniel C Postellon
          Toothpicks work. 3M makes a good spray adhesive. You could try double-faced masking tape, too.
          Message 4 of 16 , May 18, 2007
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            Toothpicks work. 3M makes a good spray adhesive. You could try
            double-faced masking tape, too.

            >
            > On May 18, 2007, at 2:08 PM, rogers92026 wrote:
            >
            >> My question for the group: what are some acceptable adhesives to use
            >> to glue various piece of styrofoam together (such as if I'm stacking
            >> several layers) that will burn-out okay in the lost-foam process ?
            >
            >
            > I like to use needles (as nails). It does not introduce any
            > impurities (like glue can) and only reinforces your final casting....
            >
            > Or, I sometimes I smear on a little bit of wax on each piece then
            > heat and mend them together.
            >
            > If you use hot glue, make sure to use it very sparingly and in very
            > thin points. I have had some problems with hot glue when it is too
            > thick (it vaporizes much slower than the foam. Whenever possible the
            > foam should be surface to surface with foam, use the adhesive
            > sparingly around the perimeter...
            >
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
            > <http://OpenOSX.com>
            > phone: 877.240.1364
            >
            >
            >
          • Jeshua Lacock
            ... True, but the advantage as far as I can see with pins is that the do not produce impurities. Burning wood and other glues certainly will. I have done many
            Message 5 of 16 , May 18, 2007
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              On May 18, 2007, at 8:45 PM, Daniel C Postellon wrote:

              > Toothpicks work. 3M makes a good spray adhesive. You could try
              > double-faced masking tape, too.

              True, but the advantage as far as I can see with pins is that the do
              not produce impurities.

              Burning wood and other glues certainly will. I have done many tests
              with wood and in fact the impurities will color the aluminum by way
              of a natural anodized layer that ranges in yellow hues with little
              wood impurities to greens and blues with additional impurities and
              finally black with lots of wood vapor...

              I would be careful with spray glues as many types can melt and deform
              your foam pattern...


              Regards,

              Jeshua Lacock, Owner
              <http://OpenOSX.com>
              phone: 877.240.1364
            • Chris Horne
              ... If the pins are made of the same material as the casting metal then yes, otherwise you are introducing dissimilar metals which can cause all sorts of nasty
              Message 6 of 16 , May 19, 2007
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                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                >
                <<<SNIP
                >
                > True, but the advantage as far as I can see with pins is that the do
                > not produce impurities.
                >


                If the pins are made of the same material as the casting metal then yes,
                otherwise you are introducing dissimilar metals which can cause all
                sorts of nasty things over the long term... far nastier in fact than
                a bit of organic fuming.

                Chris
              • Jeshua Lacock
                ... Last time I checked, the steel pins did not melt in the aluminum. FYI: steel melts at considerably higher temperatures than aluminum and has not been an
                Message 7 of 16 , May 19, 2007
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                  On May 19, 2007, at 7:12 AM, Chris Horne wrote:

                  > True, but the advantage as far as I can see with pins is that the do
                  > > not produce impurities.
                  > >
                  >
                  > If the pins are made of the same material as the casting metal then
                  > yes,
                  > otherwise you are introducing dissimilar metals which can cause all
                  > sorts of nasty things over the long term... far nastier in fact than
                  > a bit of organic fuming.


                  Last time I checked, the steel pins did not melt in the aluminum.

                  FYI: steel melts at considerably higher temperatures than aluminum
                  and has not been an issue thus far.

                  If you prefer glue than use it. I have only stated what works best
                  for me.


                  Regards,

                  Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                  <http://OpenOSX.com>
                  phone: 877.240.1364
                • Norm
                  I can understand the advantage of pins but if you plan to machine the parts in a lathe or mill after the casting is done, wouldn t having steel pins in there
                  Message 8 of 16 , May 19, 2007
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                    I can understand the advantage of pins but if you plan to
                    machine the parts in a lathe or mill after the casting is done,
                    wouldn't having steel pins in there cause problems?

                    Norm



                    --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > On May 19, 2007, at 7:12 AM, Chris Horne wrote:
                    >
                    > > True, but the advantage as far as I can see with pins is that the do
                    > > > not produce impurities.
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > > If the pins are made of the same material as the casting metal then
                    > > yes,
                    > > otherwise you are introducing dissimilar metals which can cause all
                    > > sorts of nasty things over the long term... far nastier in fact than
                    > > a bit of organic fuming.
                    >
                    >
                    > Last time I checked, the steel pins did not melt in the aluminum.
                    >
                    > FYI: steel melts at considerably higher temperatures than aluminum
                    > and has not been an issue thus far.
                    >
                    > If you prefer glue than use it. I have only stated what works best
                    > for me.
                    >
                    >
                    > Regards,
                    >
                    > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                    > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                    > phone: 877.240.1364
                    >
                  • Jeshua Lacock
                    ... For one, I have never had a pin located where it was machined. For two, I suspect that the pin would just get machined like your part.. I suppose you could
                    Message 9 of 16 , May 19, 2007
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                      On May 19, 2007, at 4:10 PM, Norm wrote:

                      > I can understand the advantage of pins but if you plan to
                      > machine the parts in a lathe or mill after the casting is done,
                      > wouldn't having steel pins in there cause problems?

                      For one, I have never had a pin located where it was machined. For
                      two, I suspect that the pin would just get machined like your part..

                      I suppose you could always snap it off (with a pair of needle nose)
                      and sand it down on your wheel...


                      Cheers,

                      Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                      <http://OpenOSX.com>
                      phone: 877.240.1364
                    • Jack
                      Back to the adhesive part of this thread: I have not tried this but I suspect it would work - use bathroom silicone. I know it will burn out because I did a
                      Message 10 of 16 , May 19, 2007
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                        Back to the adhesive part of this thread: I have not tried this but I
                        suspect it would work - use bathroom silicone. I know it will burn
                        out because I did a melt a week or so ago which contained many pieces
                        of scrap with blobs of clear silicone stuck to 'em. Absolutely no
                        sign of the blobs when it came pour time. Speed of burnout would be
                        the main question, but very thin film would probably help. I propose
                        to test this with my next built-up mold.

                        Another thought: the silicone may be ok for brass because of the
                        higher temp?
                        Jack





                        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > On May 19, 2007, at 4:10 PM, Norm wrote:
                        >
                        > > I can understand the advantage of pins but if you plan to
                        > > machine the parts in a lathe or mill after the casting is done,
                        > > wouldn't having steel pins in there cause problems?
                        >
                        > For one, I have never had a pin located where it was machined. For
                        > two, I suspect that the pin would just get machined like your part..
                        >
                        > I suppose you could always snap it off (with a pair of needle
                        nose)
                        > and sand it down on your wheel...
                        >
                        >
                        > Cheers,
                        >
                        > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                        > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                        > phone: 877.240.1364
                        >
                      • Rodney Grantham
                        ... I use ordinary rubber cement. It is contact cement so it must dry completely before putting the pieces together. Sometimes a second coat is helpful.
                        Message 11 of 16 , May 19, 2007
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                          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "rogers92026" <brogers9941@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I finally built a hot-wire styrofoam cutter. (Fun project!)
                          >
                          > My question for the group: what are some acceptable adhesives to use
                          > to glue various piece of styrofoam together (such as if I'm stacking
                          > several layers) that will burn-out okay in the lost-foam process ?
                          >
                          > Bruce
                          >

                          I use ordinary rubber cement. It is contact cement so it must dry
                          completely before putting the pieces together. Sometimes a second coat
                          is helpful. Rubber cement also helps fill surface voids, although the
                          texture of the foam will still show on finished casting.

                          Rod
                        • Ray
                          I use either UHU school and office paper glue in the roll on stick or else white PVC wood glue if you need a bit more strength. If possible make your model one
                          Message 12 of 16 , May 20, 2007
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                            I use either UHU school and office paper glue in the roll on stick or
                            else white PVC wood glue if you need a bit more strength. If possible
                            make your model one night and cast the next.

                            I use pins for holding the pieces together while the glue dries and
                            remove before casting.

                            This week I cast an aluminium bearing mount (double ended) and after
                            maching on the 9x20 it works great!

                            Ray
                            Perth Western Australia.
                          • Bruce Hoover
                            Hello I use hot glue just around the edges to seal out the plaster. I have cast many parts that were cut out of blue foam then glued together in this manor. A
                            Message 13 of 16 , May 20, 2007
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                              Hello
                              I use hot glue just around the edges to seal out the plaster. I have cast many parts that were cut out of blue foam then glued together in this manor. A friend of mine is helping me with some parts and he found a cool way to coat the foam blanks. he thinned down drywall mud and used a cheap paint gun to spray on the mud. several coats with a chance to dry in between works great.

                              Hope this helps
                              Bruce


                              Bruce Hoover

                              ---------------------------------
                              Be a better Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who knows.
                              Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Jack
                              The only problem I have with the UHU or pva glues is when I plaster the model, the water etches the glue and lets plaster into the joint. What I need is a glue
                              Message 14 of 16 , May 22, 2007
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                                The only problem I have with the UHU or pva glues is when I plaster the
                                model, the water etches the glue and lets plaster into the joint. What
                                I need is a glue that dries waterproof or a non-water-based
                                investment/plaster that won't burn off during the pour. I have tried
                                protecting the joints with a strip of masking tape, but this is not
                                always feasible due to odd shapes.
                                Jack




                                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Ray" <pemby200@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I use either UHU school and office paper glue in the roll on stick or
                                > else white PVC wood glue if you need a bit more strength. If possible
                                > make your model one night and cast the next.
                                >
                                > I use pins for holding the pieces together while the glue dries and
                                > remove before casting.
                                >
                                > This week I cast an aluminium bearing mount (double ended) and after
                                > maching on the 9x20 it works great!
                                >
                                > Ray
                                > Perth Western Australia.
                                >
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