Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Mobile Foundries...Does Anyone Have One?

Expand Messages
  • too_many_tools
    I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make mobile and am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I envision having the furnace
    Message 1 of 20 , Apr 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make mobile and
      am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I envision
      having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the foundry
      can be used and then stored.

      Has anyone done this?

      If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
      implemented it.

      Thanks

      TMT
    • gott24u
      Hello TMT, I have a Johnson 900 that is mobile . The good fella I bought it from mobilized it (I might have done it a bit diffeerent, but seems to work fine).
      Message 2 of 20 , Apr 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello TMT,

        I have a Johnson 900 that is "mobile". The good fella I bought it from
        mobilized it (I might have done it a bit diffeerent, but seems to work
        fine). The furnace body is mounted on a round platform made of plywood,
        with four casters underneath. The control unit is on a separate
        platform with casters. It rolls easily on concrete and hard ground. I
        am not a fan of the wood and many will tell you that it is not a good
        idea due to fire hazard - this is logical, but good, safe foundry
        practice has kept it from burning for many decades now. Casters are
        fairly light duty.

        Gott
      • Lyle
        I ll take a photo of my MIFCO 16 on a homemade cart that I ve welded up. and post tonight. The biggest idea is to keep it as low as possible. LL ... foundry
        Message 3 of 20 , Apr 2, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          I'll take a photo of my MIFCO 16 on a homemade cart that I've welded up.
          and post tonight. The biggest idea is to keep it as low as possible.
          LL

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools" <too_many_tools@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make mobile and
          > am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I envision
          > having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the
          foundry
          > can be used and then stored.
          >
          > Has anyone done this?
          >
          > If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
          > implemented it.
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          > TMT
          >
        • Stone Tool
          The height of the furnace ceases to be an issue if you have one with a lift off body rather than using a lift out crucible. Mine is on iron wheels from
          Message 4 of 20 , Apr 2, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            The height of the furnace ceases to be an issue if you have one with a
            lift off body rather than using a "lift out" crucible. Mine is on iron
            wheels from some kind of farm implement..... about 18" diameter steel
            spoke wheels actually, and the furnace body lifts clear of the base and
            swings out of the way. A tilting furnace might also work well as a
            mobile unit. The next upgrade must be a lift & pour tong that will
            allow you to lift the crucible directly off the plinth and pour without
            setting it in a pouring shank. I envision a steel ring that you drop
            over the crucible first, and jaws that close around the lower portion.
            The idea of dropping the ring over first is to reduce the risk of
            tipping the works over. Anybody seen anything like this?

            H.W.

            Lyle wrote:
            > I'll take a photo of my MIFCO 16 on a homemade cart that I've welded up.
            > and post tonight. The biggest idea is to keep it as low as possible.
            > LL
            >
            > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools" <too_many_tools@...>
            > wrote:
            >> I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make mobile and
            >> am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I envision
            >> having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the
            > foundry
            >> can be used and then stored.
            >>
            >> Has anyone done this?
            >>
            >> If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
            >> implemented it.
            >>
            >> Thanks
            >>
            >> TMT
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
            > this list does not accept attachments.
            >
            > Files area and list services are at:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
            >
            > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
            > check out these two affiliated sites:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
            >
            > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
            > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
            >
            > List Owner:
            > owly@...
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Lyle
            I used castors on the bottom of my homemade #16 crucible furnace but the biggest problem I see with doing that is it raises the furnace which means you need to
            Message 5 of 20 , Apr 2, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              I used castors on the bottom of my homemade #16 crucible furnace but
              the biggest problem I see with doing that is it raises the furnace
              which means you need to lift the crucible even higher than normal to
              remove it. I solved this problem with my MIFCO furnace by welding the
              castors sideways so the Wheels only touch the floor when I lift up the
              handle welded to the opposite side of the cart. Not much ground
              clearance this way but it works. I also incorperated a wire mesh
              platform where I can put ingots, tools, etc in otherwise wasted space
              over the burner and blower assembly.
              LL

              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "gott24u" <gott24u@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello TMT,
              >
              > I have a Johnson 900 that is "mobile". The good fella I bought it
              from
              > mobilized it (I might have done it a bit diffeerent, but seems to
              work
              > fine). The furnace body is mounted on a round platform made of
              plywood,
              > with four casters underneath. The control unit is on a separate
              > platform with casters. It rolls easily on concrete and hard ground. I
              > am not a fan of the wood and many will tell you that it is not a good
              > idea due to fire hazard - this is logical, but good, safe foundry
              > practice has kept it from burning for many decades now. Casters are
              > fairly light duty.
              >
              > Gott
              >
            • Lyle
              Your right but he was talking about a Johnson furnace. I ve always been a little leary (and perhaps wrongly) about lift up body furnaces. Mental picture of
              Message 6 of 20 , Apr 2, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Your right but he was talking about a Johnson furnace. I've always
                been a little leary (and perhaps wrongly) about lift up body
                furnaces. Mental picture of taking the crucible out just as the body
                falls down onto the shank, crucible, etc. Of course, my lift out
                furnace necessitates my melt being about crotch high when I lift it
                out and the shanks lock but there's some danger there too. I've never
                seen any shanks like your talking about except for those bent
                lift/pour shanks that are used for smaller sized crucibles. ?They
                wouldn't work for larger sizes though. I use one on a number 4
                crucible I have for a little furnace.
                How do you get your lift out shank around the crucible on that lift
                body furnace? Usually they grab the crucible from the top...?
                LL

                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                >
                > The height of the furnace ceases to be an issue if you have one
                with a
                > lift off body rather than using a "lift out" crucible. Mine is on
                iron
                > wheels from some kind of farm implement..... about 18" diameter
                steel
                > spoke wheels actually, and the furnace body lifts clear of the base
                and
                > swings out of the way. A tilting furnace might also work well as a
                > mobile unit. The next upgrade must be a lift & pour tong that will
                > allow you to lift the crucible directly off the plinth and pour
                without
                > setting it in a pouring shank. I envision a steel ring that you
                drop
                > over the crucible first, and jaws that close around the lower
                portion.
                > The idea of dropping the ring over first is to reduce the risk of
                > tipping the works over. Anybody seen anything like this?
                >
                > H.W.
                >
                > Lyle wrote:
                > > I'll take a photo of my MIFCO 16 on a homemade cart that I've
                welded up.
                > > and post tonight. The biggest idea is to keep it as low as
                possible.
                > > LL
                > >
                > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                <too_many_tools@>
                > > wrote:
                > >> I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make
                mobile and
                > >> am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I
                envision
                > >> having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the
                > > foundry
                > >> can be used and then stored.
                > >>
                > >> Has anyone done this?
                > >>
                > >> If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                > >> implemented it.
                > >>
                > >> Thanks
                > >>
                > >> TMT
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                > > this list does not accept attachments.
                > >
                > > Files area and list services are at:
                > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                > >
                > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                > > check out these two affiliated sites:
                > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                > >
                > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                > >
                > > List Owner:
                > > owly@...
                > >
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
              • Stone Tool
                Lyle: My furnace is not of conventional design....... It uses a small winch (hand crank) to lift the upper body..... this winch is a worm drive unit and cannot
                Message 7 of 20 , Apr 2, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Lyle:
                  My furnace is not of conventional design....... It uses a small winch
                  (hand crank) to lift the upper body..... this winch is a worm drive unit
                  and cannot freewheel. The furnace body is mounted to a carriage which
                  travels up a square tube post (2x2x.25). The carriage uses cable
                  pulleys as wheels.... fairly large pulleys (5") with bronze bushings
                  that run on 1/2" round rod welded to opposite corners of the square tube
                  to make a track. A very simple way of making accurate smooth tracking.
                  The furnace body is mounted in a manner that allows it to swing to
                  the side on hinges completely away from the crucible leaving the
                  crucible standing completely in the open atop the plinth. The swing
                  away is the crucial design feature which allows you to do anything you
                  want with nothing in the way.... but also ensures that if you knock it
                  over it is going to spill molten metal all over the floor rather than
                  into the furnace base which has a low wall around it after the body is
                  lifted off..... this wall extends only slightly above the level of the
                  plinth.
                  The swing away system is designed in such a way that you cannot swing
                  it until the body is entirely clear of the crucible......and also so
                  that once it is swung at all it cannot come down as it is physically
                  blocked from coming down. There is absolutely no risk of dropping the
                  furnace body inadvertently....... none. Conventional tongs and pouring
                  shank work just as they would in an ordinary furnace except that you do
                  not have to lift the crucible up and out, just lift it an inch or so and
                  swing it over to set it in the pouring shank.

                  The winter before last I built a large tilting furnace for an artist
                  friend...... I'm not sure how much aluminum it would contain but it
                  would be measured in gallons. This furnace is skid mounted but could
                  easily be mounted on wheels. I uses a steel crucible which is more or
                  less permanently attached..... made from seamless steel tubing with an
                  angle iron pour spout that ends at a point that does not change as the
                  furnace is tilted. The furnace uses a rammed plastic refractory base
                  and lid with stabilized KOwool above the "blast zone". Unfortunately
                  the lady took one look at the monstrosity...... she wanted BIG ..... and
                  said she could not pour molten metal without hand pouring from a
                  crucible, and that it was way too high off the floor to work........ We
                  had discussed the tilting design beforehand... but she is more than a
                  little fickle. My intent was to have a molding bench / sand table /
                  pouring bench at a decent working height where the mold would rest which
                  would roll easily and smoothly on the concrete floor to position the
                  sprue(s) under the spout leaving a few inches of pour height..... and
                  easy job.
                  I built a suitably massive burner to feed the furnace.... a burner that
                  takes several 100 lb bottles to feed it, but have never fired the
                  furnace...... the winch system for pouring turned out not to my
                  satisfaction and needs redesign, but all that remains is to build the
                  molding bench and redesign the pouring mechanism. I walked away in
                  disgust after her rejection of the entire design....... but hope
                  eventually to complete it for my own use....... It is capable of doing
                  some pretty large pours. It was my intent to do a crucible wash to
                  extend crucible life....... the crucible is fairly thick steel....... I
                  wonder how long it will take to burn out.........
                  My thinking is that the bench would need to be adjustable height.....
                  not a real problem, and that the furnace would be intended to do
                  multiple pours on one heat...... I can imagine what shrinkage issues
                  would show up with very large single pours.
                  It's a shame that the furnace sits unfired........ someday!

                  H.W.

                  Lyle wrote:
                  > Your right but he was talking about a Johnson furnace. I've always
                  > been a little leary (and perhaps wrongly) about lift up body
                  > furnaces. Mental picture of taking the crucible out just as the body
                  > falls down onto the shank, crucible, etc. Of course, my lift out
                  > furnace necessitates my melt being about crotch high when I lift it
                  > out and the shanks lock but there's some danger there too. I've never
                  > seen any shanks like your talking about except for those bent
                  > lift/pour shanks that are used for smaller sized crucibles. ?They
                  > wouldn't work for larger sizes though. I use one on a number 4
                  > crucible I have for a little furnace.
                  > How do you get your lift out shank around the crucible on that lift
                  > body furnace? Usually they grab the crucible from the top...?
                  > LL
                  >
                  > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                  >> The height of the furnace ceases to be an issue if you have one
                  > with a
                  >> lift off body rather than using a "lift out" crucible. Mine is on
                  > iron
                  >> wheels from some kind of farm implement..... about 18" diameter
                  > steel
                  >> spoke wheels actually, and the furnace body lifts clear of the base
                  > and
                  >> swings out of the way. A tilting furnace might also work well as a
                  >> mobile unit. The next upgrade must be a lift & pour tong that will
                  >> allow you to lift the crucible directly off the plinth and pour
                  > without
                  >> setting it in a pouring shank. I envision a steel ring that you
                  > drop
                  >> over the crucible first, and jaws that close around the lower
                  > portion.
                  >> The idea of dropping the ring over first is to reduce the risk of
                  >> tipping the works over. Anybody seen anything like this?
                  >>
                  >> H.W.
                  >>
                  >> Lyle wrote:
                  >>> I'll take a photo of my MIFCO 16 on a homemade cart that I've
                  > welded up.
                  >>> and post tonight. The biggest idea is to keep it as low as
                  > possible.
                  >>> LL
                  >>>
                  >>> --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                  > <too_many_tools@>
                  >>> wrote:
                  >>>> I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make
                  > mobile and
                  >>>> am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I
                  > envision
                  >>>> having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the
                  >>> foundry
                  >>>> can be used and then stored.
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Has anyone done this?
                  >>>>
                  >>>> If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                  >>>> implemented it.
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Thanks
                  >>>>
                  >>>> TMT
                  >>>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                  >>> this list does not accept attachments.
                  >>>
                  >>> Files area and list services are at:
                  >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                  >>>
                  >>> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                  >>> check out these two affiliated sites:
                  >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                  >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                  >>>
                  >>> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                  >>> http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                  >>>
                  >>> List Owner:
                  >>> owly@...
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                  > this list does not accept attachments.
                  >
                  > Files area and list services are at:
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                  >
                  > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                  > check out these two affiliated sites:
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                  >
                  > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                  > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                  >
                  > List Owner:
                  > owly@...
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Lyle
                  Ok I just loaded a photo of my Mifco furnace on a homemade caddy with dollys at one end and a handle at the other. I welded it up in two sections which bolt
                  Message 8 of 20 , Apr 2, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Ok I just loaded a photo of my Mifco furnace on a homemade caddy with
                    dollys at one end and a handle at the other. I welded it up in two
                    sections which bolt together so you can fit the furnace inside it.
                    Note the legs of the furnace are sitting on the inside flange of the
                    bottom angle irons. If you look closely, you'll see two steel castors
                    welded sideways at the end. these just barely touch the ground and
                    you are able to roll them by picking up the other end. The idea was
                    to minimize the additional height required if I welded them
                    vertically. Note also the mesh rack ontop. If i were to do things
                    different, I'd weld a rack for the shanks, skimmers, etc and extend
                    the gas ball valve so I don't have to reach underneith. I will do
                    this at some point this summer. Hope this helps.
                    HW, man you have some real ambitious projects! Keep up the good work
                    and fire that sucker up!
                    Oh yeah, the photo is in the file section under my name:Lyle.

                    LL

                    --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Lyle:
                    > My furnace is not of conventional design....... It uses a
                    small winch
                    > (hand crank) to lift the upper body..... this winch is a worm drive
                    unit
                    > and cannot freewheel. The furnace body is mounted to a carriage
                    which
                    > travels up a square tube post (2x2x.25). The carriage uses cable
                    > pulleys as wheels.... fairly large pulleys (5") with bronze
                    bushings
                    > that run on 1/2" round rod welded to opposite corners of the square
                    tube
                    > to make a track. A very simple way of making accurate smooth
                    tracking.
                    > The furnace body is mounted in a manner that allows it to swing
                    to
                    > the side on hinges completely away from the crucible leaving the
                    > crucible standing completely in the open atop the plinth. The
                    swing
                    > away is the crucial design feature which allows you to do anything
                    you
                    > want with nothing in the way.... but also ensures that if you knock
                    it
                    > over it is going to spill molten metal all over the floor rather
                    than
                    > into the furnace base which has a low wall around it after the body
                    is
                    > lifted off..... this wall extends only slightly above the level of
                    the
                    > plinth.
                    > The swing away system is designed in such a way that you
                    cannot swing
                    > it until the body is entirely clear of the crucible......and also
                    so
                    > that once it is swung at all it cannot come down as it is
                    physically
                    > blocked from coming down. There is absolutely no risk of dropping
                    the
                    > furnace body inadvertently....... none. Conventional tongs and
                    pouring
                    > shank work just as they would in an ordinary furnace except that
                    you do
                    > not have to lift the crucible up and out, just lift it an inch or
                    so and
                    > swing it over to set it in the pouring shank.
                    >
                    > The winter before last I built a large tilting furnace for an
                    artist
                    > friend...... I'm not sure how much aluminum it would contain but it
                    > would be measured in gallons. This furnace is skid mounted but
                    could
                    > easily be mounted on wheels. I uses a steel crucible which is more
                    or
                    > less permanently attached..... made from seamless steel tubing with
                    an
                    > angle iron pour spout that ends at a point that does not change as
                    the
                    > furnace is tilted. The furnace uses a rammed plastic refractory
                    base
                    > and lid with stabilized KOwool above the "blast zone".
                    Unfortunately
                    > the lady took one look at the monstrosity...... she wanted
                    BIG ..... and
                    > said she could not pour molten metal without hand pouring from a
                    > crucible, and that it was way too high off the floor to
                    work........ We
                    > had discussed the tilting design beforehand... but she is more than
                    a
                    > little fickle. My intent was to have a molding bench / sand
                    table /
                    > pouring bench at a decent working height where the mold would rest
                    which
                    > would roll easily and smoothly on the concrete floor to position
                    the
                    > sprue(s) under the spout leaving a few inches of pour height.....
                    and
                    > easy job.
                    > I built a suitably massive burner to feed the furnace.... a
                    burner that
                    > takes several 100 lb bottles to feed it, but have never fired the
                    > furnace...... the winch system for pouring turned out not to my
                    > satisfaction and needs redesign, but all that remains is to build
                    the
                    > molding bench and redesign the pouring mechanism. I walked away
                    in
                    > disgust after her rejection of the entire design....... but hope
                    > eventually to complete it for my own use....... It is capable of
                    doing
                    > some pretty large pours. It was my intent to do a crucible wash
                    to
                    > extend crucible life....... the crucible is fairly thick
                    steel....... I
                    > wonder how long it will take to burn out.........
                    > My thinking is that the bench would need to be adjustable
                    height.....
                    > not a real problem, and that the furnace would be intended to do
                    > multiple pours on one heat...... I can imagine what shrinkage
                    issues
                    > would show up with very large single pours.
                    > It's a shame that the furnace sits unfired........ someday!
                    >
                    > H.W.
                    >
                    > Lyle wrote:
                    > > Your right but he was talking about a Johnson furnace. I've
                    always
                    > > been a little leary (and perhaps wrongly) about lift up body
                    > > furnaces. Mental picture of taking the crucible out just as the
                    body
                    > > falls down onto the shank, crucible, etc. Of course, my lift out
                    > > furnace necessitates my melt being about crotch high when I lift
                    it
                    > > out and the shanks lock but there's some danger there too. I've
                    never
                    > > seen any shanks like your talking about except for those bent
                    > > lift/pour shanks that are used for smaller sized crucibles. ?They
                    > > wouldn't work for larger sizes though. I use one on a number 4
                    > > crucible I have for a little furnace.
                    > > How do you get your lift out shank around the crucible on that
                    lift
                    > > body furnace? Usually they grab the crucible from the top...?
                    > > LL
                    > >
                    > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@> wrote:
                    > >> The height of the furnace ceases to be an issue if you have one
                    > > with a
                    > >> lift off body rather than using a "lift out" crucible. Mine is
                    on
                    > > iron
                    > >> wheels from some kind of farm implement..... about 18" diameter
                    > > steel
                    > >> spoke wheels actually, and the furnace body lifts clear of the
                    base
                    > > and
                    > >> swings out of the way. A tilting furnace might also work well
                    as a
                    > >> mobile unit. The next upgrade must be a lift & pour tong that
                    will
                    > >> allow you to lift the crucible directly off the plinth and pour
                    > > without
                    > >> setting it in a pouring shank. I envision a steel ring that you
                    > > drop
                    > >> over the crucible first, and jaws that close around the lower
                    > > portion.
                    > >> The idea of dropping the ring over first is to reduce the risk
                    of
                    > >> tipping the works over. Anybody seen anything like this?
                    > >>
                    > >> H.W.
                    > >>
                    > >> Lyle wrote:
                    > >>> I'll take a photo of my MIFCO 16 on a homemade cart that I've
                    > > welded up.
                    > >>> and post tonight. The biggest idea is to keep it as low as
                    > > possible.
                    > >>> LL
                    > >>>
                    > >>> --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                    > > <too_many_tools@>
                    > >>> wrote:
                    > >>>> I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make
                    > > mobile and
                    > >>>> am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I
                    > > envision
                    > >>>> having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where
                    the
                    > >>> foundry
                    > >>>> can be used and then stored.
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>> Has anyone done this?
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>> If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                    > >>>> implemented it.
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>> Thanks
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>> TMT
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                    > >>> this list does not accept attachments.
                    > >>>
                    > >>> Files area and list services are at:
                    > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                    > >>>
                    > >>> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                    > >>> check out these two affiliated sites:
                    > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                    > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                    > >>>
                    > >>> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                    > >>> http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                    > >>>
                    > >>> List Owner:
                    > >>> owly@
                    > >>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                    > > this list does not accept attachments.
                    > >
                    > > Files area and list services are at:
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                    > >
                    > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                    > > check out these two affiliated sites:
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                    > >
                    > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                    > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                    > >
                    > > List Owner:
                    > > owly@...
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Lyle
                    HW: I can post a photo of my pouring bench. My biggest mistake was to make it the same height as my molding bench thinking that I wouldn t have to bend over to
                    Message 9 of 20 , Apr 2, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      HW:
                      I can post a photo of my pouring bench. My biggest mistake was to
                      make it the same height as my molding bench thinking that I wouldn't
                      have to bend over to place the molds. Just move them sideways onto
                      the pour bench. Well, that works for aluminum but pouring 40 lbs of
                      bronze with a one man shank you need it to be lower. The one good
                      thing about my bench though is that it doubles as a welding bench by
                      flopping a 1/4" piece of plate steel onto it.
                      LL

                      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Lyle:
                      > My furnace is not of conventional design....... It uses a
                      small winch
                      > (hand crank) to lift the upper body..... this winch is a worm drive
                      unit
                      > and cannot freewheel. The furnace body is mounted to a carriage
                      which
                      > travels up a square tube post (2x2x.25). The carriage uses cable
                      > pulleys as wheels.... fairly large pulleys (5") with bronze
                      bushings
                      > that run on 1/2" round rod welded to opposite corners of the square
                      tube
                      > to make a track. A very simple way of making accurate smooth
                      tracking.
                      > The furnace body is mounted in a manner that allows it to swing
                      to
                      > the side on hinges completely away from the crucible leaving the
                      > crucible standing completely in the open atop the plinth. The
                      swing
                      > away is the crucial design feature which allows you to do anything
                      you
                      > want with nothing in the way.... but also ensures that if you knock
                      it
                      > over it is going to spill molten metal all over the floor rather
                      than
                      > into the furnace base which has a low wall around it after the body
                      is
                      > lifted off..... this wall extends only slightly above the level of
                      the
                      > plinth.
                      > The swing away system is designed in such a way that you
                      cannot swing
                      > it until the body is entirely clear of the crucible......and also
                      so
                      > that once it is swung at all it cannot come down as it is
                      physically
                      > blocked from coming down. There is absolutely no risk of dropping
                      the
                      > furnace body inadvertently....... none. Conventional tongs and
                      pouring
                      > shank work just as they would in an ordinary furnace except that
                      you do
                      > not have to lift the crucible up and out, just lift it an inch or
                      so and
                      > swing it over to set it in the pouring shank.
                      >
                      > The winter before last I built a large tilting furnace for an
                      artist
                      > friend...... I'm not sure how much aluminum it would contain but it
                      > would be measured in gallons. This furnace is skid mounted but
                      could
                      > easily be mounted on wheels. I uses a steel crucible which is more
                      or
                      > less permanently attached..... made from seamless steel tubing with
                      an
                      > angle iron pour spout that ends at a point that does not change as
                      the
                      > furnace is tilted. The furnace uses a rammed plastic refractory
                      base
                      > and lid with stabilized KOwool above the "blast zone".
                      Unfortunately
                      > the lady took one look at the monstrosity...... she wanted
                      BIG ..... and
                      > said she could not pour molten metal without hand pouring from a
                      > crucible, and that it was way too high off the floor to
                      work........ We
                      > had discussed the tilting design beforehand... but she is more than
                      a
                      > little fickle. My intent was to have a molding bench / sand
                      table /
                      > pouring bench at a decent working height where the mold would rest
                      which
                      > would roll easily and smoothly on the concrete floor to position
                      the
                      > sprue(s) under the spout leaving a few inches of pour height.....
                      and
                      > easy job.
                      > I built a suitably massive burner to feed the furnace.... a
                      burner that
                      > takes several 100 lb bottles to feed it, but have never fired the
                      > furnace...... the winch system for pouring turned out not to my
                      > satisfaction and needs redesign, but all that remains is to build
                      the
                      > molding bench and redesign the pouring mechanism. I walked away
                      in
                      > disgust after her rejection of the entire design....... but hope
                      > eventually to complete it for my own use....... It is capable of
                      doing
                      > some pretty large pours. It was my intent to do a crucible wash
                      to
                      > extend crucible life....... the crucible is fairly thick
                      steel....... I
                      > wonder how long it will take to burn out.........
                      > My thinking is that the bench would need to be adjustable
                      height.....
                      > not a real problem, and that the furnace would be intended to do
                      > multiple pours on one heat...... I can imagine what shrinkage
                      issues
                      > would show up with very large single pours.
                      > It's a shame that the furnace sits unfired........ someday!
                      >
                      > H.W.
                      >
                      > Lyle wrote:
                      > > Your right but he was talking about a Johnson furnace. I've
                      always
                      > > been a little leary (and perhaps wrongly) about lift up body
                      > > furnaces. Mental picture of taking the crucible out just as the
                      body
                      > > falls down onto the shank, crucible, etc. Of course, my lift out
                      > > furnace necessitates my melt being about crotch high when I lift
                      it
                      > > out and the shanks lock but there's some danger there too. I've
                      never
                      > > seen any shanks like your talking about except for those bent
                      > > lift/pour shanks that are used for smaller sized crucibles. ?They
                      > > wouldn't work for larger sizes though. I use one on a number 4
                      > > crucible I have for a little furnace.
                      > > How do you get your lift out shank around the crucible on that
                      lift
                      > > body furnace? Usually they grab the crucible from the top...?
                      > > LL
                      > >
                      > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@> wrote:
                      > >> The height of the furnace ceases to be an issue if you have one
                      > > with a
                      > >> lift off body rather than using a "lift out" crucible. Mine is
                      on
                      > > iron
                      > >> wheels from some kind of farm implement..... about 18" diameter
                      > > steel
                      > >> spoke wheels actually, and the furnace body lifts clear of the
                      base
                      > > and
                      > >> swings out of the way. A tilting furnace might also work well
                      as a
                      > >> mobile unit. The next upgrade must be a lift & pour tong that
                      will
                      > >> allow you to lift the crucible directly off the plinth and pour
                      > > without
                      > >> setting it in a pouring shank. I envision a steel ring that you
                      > > drop
                      > >> over the crucible first, and jaws that close around the lower
                      > > portion.
                      > >> The idea of dropping the ring over first is to reduce the risk
                      of
                      > >> tipping the works over. Anybody seen anything like this?
                      > >>
                      > >> H.W.
                      > >>
                      > >> Lyle wrote:
                      > >>> I'll take a photo of my MIFCO 16 on a homemade cart that I've
                      > > welded up.
                      > >>> and post tonight. The biggest idea is to keep it as low as
                      > > possible.
                      > >>> LL
                      > >>>
                      > >>> --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                      > > <too_many_tools@>
                      > >>> wrote:
                      > >>>> I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make
                      > > mobile and
                      > >>>> am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I
                      > > envision
                      > >>>> having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where
                      the
                      > >>> foundry
                      > >>>> can be used and then stored.
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> Has anyone done this?
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                      > >>>> implemented it.
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> Thanks
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> TMT
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                      > >>> this list does not accept attachments.
                      > >>>
                      > >>> Files area and list services are at:
                      > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                      > >>>
                      > >>> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                      > >>> check out these two affiliated sites:
                      > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                      > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                      > >>>
                      > >>> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                      > >>> http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                      > >>>
                      > >>> List Owner:
                      > >>> owly@
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                      > > this list does not accept attachments.
                      > >
                      > > Files area and list services are at:
                      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                      > >
                      > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                      > > check out these two affiliated sites:
                      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                      > >
                      > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                      > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                      > >
                      > > List Owner:
                      > > owly@...
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Stone Tool
                      Lyle: A bit different pouring from a tilting furnace directly than doing it with a shank holding a crucible. Comfortable working height when handling heavy
                      Message 10 of 20 , Apr 2, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Lyle:
                        A bit different pouring from a tilting furnace directly than doing it
                        with a shank holding a crucible. Comfortable working height when
                        handling heavy loads is hugely important........ As I mentioned, I
                        feel that a bench for this purpose should be built so height can be
                        adjusted anyway. The Hobbicast 1 group is set up specifically for
                        posting photos and stuff..... in addition to space on the Yahoo photos
                        sections for both groups....... I always like to have a look at people's
                        projects.... A picture is worth.............

                        H.W.

                        Lyle wrote:
                        > HW:
                        > I can post a photo of my pouring bench. My biggest mistake was to
                        > make it the same height as my molding bench thinking that I wouldn't
                        > have to bend over to place the molds. Just move them sideways onto
                        > the pour bench. Well, that works for aluminum but pouring 40 lbs of
                        > bronze with a one man shank you need it to be lower. The one good
                        > thing about my bench though is that it doubles as a welding bench by
                        > flopping a 1/4" piece of plate steel onto it.
                        > LL
                        >
                        > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                        >> Lyle:
                        >> My furnace is not of conventional design....... It uses a
                        > small winch
                        >> (hand crank) to lift the upper body..... this winch is a worm drive
                        > unit
                        >> and cannot freewheel. The furnace body is mounted to a carriage
                        > which
                        >> travels up a square tube post (2x2x.25). The carriage uses cable
                        >> pulleys as wheels.... fairly large pulleys (5") with bronze
                        > bushings
                        >> that run on 1/2" round rod welded to opposite corners of the square
                        > tube
                        >> to make a track. A very simple way of making accurate smooth
                        > tracking.
                        >> The furnace body is mounted in a manner that allows it to swing
                        > to
                        >> the side on hinges completely away from the crucible leaving the
                        >> crucible standing completely in the open atop the plinth. The
                        > swing
                        >> away is the crucial design feature which allows you to do anything
                        > you
                        >> want with nothing in the way.... but also ensures that if you knock
                        > it
                        >> over it is going to spill molten metal all over the floor rather
                        > than
                        >> into the furnace base which has a low wall around it after the body
                        > is
                        >> lifted off..... this wall extends only slightly above the level of
                        > the
                        >> plinth.
                        >> The swing away system is designed in such a way that you
                        > cannot swing
                        >> it until the body is entirely clear of the crucible......and also
                        > so
                        >> that once it is swung at all it cannot come down as it is
                        > physically
                        >> blocked from coming down. There is absolutely no risk of dropping
                        > the
                        >> furnace body inadvertently....... none. Conventional tongs and
                        > pouring
                        >> shank work just as they would in an ordinary furnace except that
                        > you do
                        >> not have to lift the crucible up and out, just lift it an inch or
                        > so and
                        >> swing it over to set it in the pouring shank.
                        >>
                        >> The winter before last I built a large tilting furnace for an
                        > artist
                        >> friend...... I'm not sure how much aluminum it would contain but it
                        >> would be measured in gallons. This furnace is skid mounted but
                        > could
                        >> easily be mounted on wheels. I uses a steel crucible which is more
                        > or
                        >> less permanently attached..... made from seamless steel tubing with
                        > an
                        >> angle iron pour spout that ends at a point that does not change as
                        > the
                        >> furnace is tilted. The furnace uses a rammed plastic refractory
                        > base
                        >> and lid with stabilized KOwool above the "blast zone".
                        > Unfortunately
                        >> the lady took one look at the monstrosity...... she wanted
                        > BIG ..... and
                        >> said she could not pour molten metal without hand pouring from a
                        >> crucible, and that it was way too high off the floor to
                        > work........ We
                        >> had discussed the tilting design beforehand... but she is more than
                        > a
                        >> little fickle. My intent was to have a molding bench / sand
                        > table /
                        >> pouring bench at a decent working height where the mold would rest
                        > which
                        >> would roll easily and smoothly on the concrete floor to position
                        > the
                        >> sprue(s) under the spout leaving a few inches of pour height.....
                        > and
                        >> easy job.
                        >> I built a suitably massive burner to feed the furnace.... a
                        > burner that
                        >> takes several 100 lb bottles to feed it, but have never fired the
                        >> furnace...... the winch system for pouring turned out not to my
                        >> satisfaction and needs redesign, but all that remains is to build
                        > the
                        >> molding bench and redesign the pouring mechanism. I walked away
                        > in
                        >> disgust after her rejection of the entire design....... but hope
                        >> eventually to complete it for my own use....... It is capable of
                        > doing
                        >> some pretty large pours. It was my intent to do a crucible wash
                        > to
                        >> extend crucible life....... the crucible is fairly thick
                        > steel....... I
                        >> wonder how long it will take to burn out.........
                        >> My thinking is that the bench would need to be adjustable
                        > height.....
                        >> not a real problem, and that the furnace would be intended to do
                        >> multiple pours on one heat...... I can imagine what shrinkage
                        > issues
                        >> would show up with very large single pours.
                        >> It's a shame that the furnace sits unfired........ someday!
                        >>
                        >> H.W.
                        >>
                        >> Lyle wrote:
                        >>> Your right but he was talking about a Johnson furnace. I've
                        > always
                        >>> been a little leary (and perhaps wrongly) about lift up body
                        >>> furnaces. Mental picture of taking the crucible out just as the
                        > body
                        >>> falls down onto the shank, crucible, etc. Of course, my lift out
                        >>> furnace necessitates my melt being about crotch high when I lift
                        > it
                        >>> out and the shanks lock but there's some danger there too. I've
                        > never
                        >>> seen any shanks like your talking about except for those bent
                        >>> lift/pour shanks that are used for smaller sized crucibles. ?They
                        >>> wouldn't work for larger sizes though. I use one on a number 4
                        >>> crucible I have for a little furnace.
                        >>> How do you get your lift out shank around the crucible on that
                        > lift
                        >>> body furnace? Usually they grab the crucible from the top...?
                        >>> LL
                        >>>
                        >>> --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@> wrote:
                        >>>> The height of the furnace ceases to be an issue if you have one
                        >>> with a
                        >>>> lift off body rather than using a "lift out" crucible. Mine is
                        > on
                        >>> iron
                        >>>> wheels from some kind of farm implement..... about 18" diameter
                        >>> steel
                        >>>> spoke wheels actually, and the furnace body lifts clear of the
                        > base
                        >>> and
                        >>>> swings out of the way. A tilting furnace might also work well
                        > as a
                        >>>> mobile unit. The next upgrade must be a lift & pour tong that
                        > will
                        >>>> allow you to lift the crucible directly off the plinth and pour
                        >>> without
                        >>>> setting it in a pouring shank. I envision a steel ring that you
                        >>> drop
                        >>>> over the crucible first, and jaws that close around the lower
                        >>> portion.
                        >>>> The idea of dropping the ring over first is to reduce the risk
                        > of
                        >>>> tipping the works over. Anybody seen anything like this?
                        >>>>
                        >>>> H.W.
                        >>>>
                        >>>> Lyle wrote:
                        >>>>> I'll take a photo of my MIFCO 16 on a homemade cart that I've
                        >>> welded up.
                        >>>>> and post tonight. The biggest idea is to keep it as low as
                        >>> possible.
                        >>>>> LL
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                        >>> <too_many_tools@>
                        >>>>> wrote:
                        >>>>>> I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make
                        >>> mobile and
                        >>>>>> am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I
                        >>> envision
                        >>>>>> having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where
                        > the
                        >>>>> foundry
                        >>>>>> can be used and then stored.
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>> Has anyone done this?
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>> If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                        >>>>>> implemented it.
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>> Thanks
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>> TMT
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                        >>>>> this list does not accept attachments.
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> Files area and list services are at:
                        >>>>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                        >>>>> check out these two affiliated sites:
                        >>>>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                        >>>>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                        >>>>> http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> List Owner:
                        >>>>> owly@
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>>
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>> For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                        >>> this list does not accept attachments.
                        >>>
                        >>> Files area and list services are at:
                        >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                        >>>
                        >>> For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                        >>> check out these two affiliated sites:
                        >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                        >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                        >>>
                        >>> Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                        >>> http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                        >>>
                        >>> List Owner:
                        >>> owly@...
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                        > this list does not accept attachments.
                        >
                        > Files area and list services are at:
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                        >
                        > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                        > check out these two affiliated sites:
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                        >
                        > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                        > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                        >
                        > List Owner:
                        > owly@...
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • gott24u
                        TMT - I put a pic of my Johnson 900 on casters in the group photo area, in Metallworks folder (second one). Nothing high tech, but works like a dandy, metal
                        Message 11 of 20 , Apr 3, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          TMT - I put a pic of my Johnson 900 on casters in the group photo area,
                          in Metallworks folder (second one). Nothing high tech, but works like a
                          dandy, metal frame would be better overall, but was on wood cart when I
                          bought it and have not found a reason to upgrade.

                          Gott
                        • Stone Tool
                          Is that an electric resistance element furnace? and what is the long green handle seen extending upward behind the furnace? H.W.
                          Message 12 of 20 , Apr 4, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Is that an electric resistance element furnace? and what is the long
                            green handle seen extending upward behind the furnace?

                            H.W.

                            gott24u wrote:
                            > TMT - I put a pic of my Johnson 900 on casters in the group photo area,
                            > in Metallworks folder (second one). Nothing high tech, but works like a
                            > dandy, metal frame would be better overall, but was on wood cart when I
                            > bought it and have not found a reason to upgrade.
                            >
                            > Gott
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                            > this list does not accept attachments.
                            >
                            > Files area and list services are at:
                            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                            >
                            > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                            > check out these two affiliated sites:
                            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                            >
                            > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                            > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                            >
                            > List Owner:
                            > owly@...
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          • gott24u
                            HW - It is a gas-crucible furnace (running with propane right now). It is the Johnson equivalent to a Mifco 16. The long green handle is the lid handle, as you
                            Message 13 of 20 , Apr 4, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              HW -

                              It is a gas-crucible furnace (running with propane right now). It is
                              the Johnson equivalent to a Mifco 16.

                              The long green handle is the lid handle, as you push it down, it
                              lifts the lid. It usually rests at about 45 deg angle (you can see a
                              crook in it so that it isn't centered over the center hole in the lid
                              when in the down position). I usually leave it straight up in the air
                              during melting so as to have one less thing to run into.

                              Gott

                              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Is that an electric resistance element furnace? and what is the
                              long
                              > green handle seen extending upward behind the furnace?
                              >
                              > H.W.
                              >
                            • Stone Tool
                              I was looking at that other box that appeared to be a control box of some sort..... made me wonder if the unit was electric...... H.W.
                              Message 14 of 20 , Apr 4, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                I was looking at that other box that appeared to be a control box of
                                some sort..... made me wonder if the unit was electric......

                                H.W.

                                gott24u wrote:
                                > HW -
                                >
                                > It is a gas-crucible furnace (running with propane right now). It is
                                > the Johnson equivalent to a Mifco 16.
                                >
                                > The long green handle is the lid handle, as you push it down, it
                                > lifts the lid. It usually rests at about 45 deg angle (you can see a
                                > crook in it so that it isn't centered over the center hole in the lid
                                > when in the down position). I usually leave it straight up in the air
                                > during melting so as to have one less thing to run into.
                                >
                                > Gott
                                >
                                > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                                >> Is that an electric resistance element furnace? and what is the
                                > long
                                >> green handle seen extending upward behind the furnace?
                                >>
                                >> H.W.
                                >>
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                                > this list does not accept attachments.
                                >
                                > Files area and list services are at:
                                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                                >
                                > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                                > check out these two affiliated sites:
                                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                                >
                                > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                                > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                                >
                                > List Owner:
                                > owly@...
                                >
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • Stone Tool
                                Interesting........ I was wondering about that.... the lack of visible burner or blower or anything like that also caught my attention......... H.W.
                                Message 15 of 20 , Apr 5, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Interesting........ I was wondering about that.... the lack of visible
                                  burner or blower or anything like that also caught my attention.........

                                  H.W.

                                  gott24u wrote:
                                  > HW - The Johnson units have the blower / gas controls as well as the
                                  > auto-ignite button enclosed in a console / control unit. As an aside,
                                  > it has pros and cons compared to the open controls on a Mifco. A few
                                  > pros - it detaches and re-attaches quickly for storing, another is that
                                  > the air intake for the blower is not exposed (had my pant leg get
                                  > sucked into a Mifco blower once, which cut air supply to furnace, built
                                  > up gas, and made a thunderous re-ignition). Maybe more infomration than
                                  > needed.....
                                  >
                                  > Gott
                                  >
                                  > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                                  >> I was looking at that other box that appeared to be a control box of
                                  >> some sort..... made me wonder if the unit was electric......
                                  >>
                                  >> H.W.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                                  > this list does not accept attachments.
                                  >
                                  > Files area and list services are at:
                                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                                  >
                                  > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                                  > check out these two affiliated sites:
                                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                                  >
                                  > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                                  > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                                  >
                                  > List Owner:
                                  > owly@...
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • gott24u
                                  HW - The Johnson units have the blower / gas controls as well as the auto-ignite button enclosed in a console / control unit. As an aside, it has pros and cons
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Apr 5, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    HW - The Johnson units have the blower / gas controls as well as the
                                    auto-ignite button enclosed in a console / control unit. As an aside,
                                    it has pros and cons compared to the open controls on a Mifco. A few
                                    pros - it detaches and re-attaches quickly for storing, another is that
                                    the air intake for the blower is not exposed (had my pant leg get
                                    sucked into a Mifco blower once, which cut air supply to furnace, built
                                    up gas, and made a thunderous re-ignition). Maybe more infomration than
                                    needed.....

                                    Gott

                                    --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Stone Tool <owly@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I was looking at that other box that appeared to be a control box of
                                    > some sort..... made me wonder if the unit was electric......
                                    >
                                    > H.W.
                                  • too_many_tools
                                    ... foundry ... Thanks for the responses so far. I appreciate the pictures...does anyone else have others to post? Since my casting efforts will be of a
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Apr 13, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools" <too_many_tools@...>
                                      wrote:
                                      >
                                      > I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make mobile and
                                      > am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I envision
                                      > having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the
                                      foundry
                                      > can be used and then stored.
                                      >
                                      > Has anyone done this?
                                      >
                                      > If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                                      > implemented it.
                                      >
                                      > Thanks
                                      >
                                      > TMT
                                      >

                                      Thanks for the responses so far.

                                      I appreciate the pictures...does anyone else have others to post?

                                      Since my casting efforts will be of a weekend nature and shop space is
                                      at a premium, what suggestions does the group have for a portable and
                                      space efficient molding/casting bench and portable foundry setup?
                                      Pictures of examples would be great.

                                      As I have mentioned before I have a Johnson furnace which I plan on
                                      running on propane (100# tank).

                                      Other than the photo section of this group, are there any other groups
                                      that cover casting that have photos of examples of foundry setups?


                                      Thanks

                                      TMT
                                    • karl kean
                                      TMT, The first thing that comes to mind would be to leave the propane tank outside. If we take it a step further why not the furnace? Would it be better to
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Apr 13, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        TMT, The first thing that comes to mind would be to leave the propane tank outside. If we take it a step further why not the furnace? Would it be better to make a easily removable enclosure, then valuable space would be at hand throughout the week.
                                        Karl
                                        too_many_tools <too_many_tools@...> wrote: --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools" <too_many_tools@...>
                                        wrote:
                                        >
                                        > I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make mobile and
                                        > am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I envision
                                        > having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the
                                        foundry
                                        > can be used and then stored.
                                        >
                                        > Has anyone done this?
                                        >
                                        > If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                                        > implemented it.
                                        >
                                        > Thanks
                                        >
                                        > TMT
                                        >

                                        Thanks for the responses so far.

                                        I appreciate the pictures...does anyone else have others to post?

                                        Since my casting efforts will be of a weekend nature and shop space is
                                        at a premium, what suggestions does the group have for a portable and
                                        space efficient molding/casting bench and portable foundry setup?
                                        Pictures of examples would be great.

                                        As I have mentioned before I have a Johnson furnace which I plan on
                                        running on propane (100# tank).

                                        Other than the photo section of this group, are there any other groups
                                        that cover casting that have photos of examples of foundry setups?

                                        Thanks

                                        TMT








                                        ---------------------------------
                                        Ahhh...imagining that irresistible "new car" smell?
                                        Check outnew cars at Yahoo! Autos.

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Lyle
                                        I ll go out today and take a phot of my pouring and molding benches. I have 5 molds ready to go that are being poured sometime today. Lyle ...
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Apr 15, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          I'll go out today and take a phot of my pouring and molding benches.
                                          I have 5 molds ready to go that are being poured sometime today.
                                          Lyle
                                          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                                          <too_many_tools@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                                          <too_many_tools@>
                                          > wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make mobile
                                          and
                                          > > am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I
                                          envision
                                          > > having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the
                                          > foundry
                                          > > can be used and then stored.
                                          > >
                                          > > Has anyone done this?
                                          > >
                                          > > If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                                          > > implemented it.
                                          > >
                                          > > Thanks
                                          > >
                                          > > TMT
                                          > >
                                          >
                                          > Thanks for the responses so far.
                                          >
                                          > I appreciate the pictures...does anyone else have others to post?
                                          >
                                          > Since my casting efforts will be of a weekend nature and shop space
                                          is
                                          > at a premium, what suggestions does the group have for a portable
                                          and
                                          > space efficient molding/casting bench and portable foundry setup?
                                          > Pictures of examples would be great.
                                          >
                                          > As I have mentioned before I have a Johnson furnace which I plan on
                                          > running on propane (100# tank).
                                          >
                                          > Other than the photo section of this group, are there any other
                                          groups
                                          > that cover casting that have photos of examples of foundry setups?
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > Thanks
                                          >
                                          > TMT
                                          >
                                        • Lyle
                                          TMT, I took some photos which I put under Lyle s Stuff in the files section. Although I wouldn t really consider it portable all the stuff I made has
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Apr 15, 2007
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            TMT,
                                            I took some photos which I put under "Lyle's Stuff" in the files
                                            section. Although I wouldn't really consider it "portable" all the
                                            stuff I made has castors. My MIFCO B-16 furnace caddy that I also put
                                            a grated table on to hold a smaller furnace and tools, really sance
                                            workbench space as the space used is otherwise wasted over the top of
                                            the blower assemebly. the mold bench has castors on it and I can flip
                                            on a 1/4" piece of steel and it doubles as a welding bench. It sits
                                            right next to my molding bench. You can sort of get the idea. The one
                                            thing you SHOULD do if you put your furnace on wheels is to use solid
                                            steel wheels and not pneumatic ones. If you ever get hot metal agains
                                            an air tire, you can guess what would happen. Please excuse the mess
                                            in my shop when you look at the photos as there's always something
                                            going on in there and I'd rather make stuff than clean up stuff..
                                            LL

                                            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                                            <too_many_tools@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "too_many_tools"
                                            <too_many_tools@>
                                            > wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > I have a Johnson foundry furnace that I would like to make mobile
                                            and
                                            > > am looking for ideas as to how to build the foundry cart. I
                                            envision
                                            > > having the furnace and supporting equipment on a cart where the
                                            > foundry
                                            > > can be used and then stored.
                                            > >
                                            > > Has anyone done this?
                                            > >
                                            > > If so, I would appreciate your advice and pictures of how you
                                            > > implemented it.
                                            > >
                                            > > Thanks
                                            > >
                                            > > TMT
                                            > >
                                            >
                                            > Thanks for the responses so far.
                                            >
                                            > I appreciate the pictures...does anyone else have others to post?
                                            >
                                            > Since my casting efforts will be of a weekend nature and shop space
                                            is
                                            > at a premium, what suggestions does the group have for a portable
                                            and
                                            > space efficient molding/casting bench and portable foundry setup?
                                            > Pictures of examples would be great.
                                            >
                                            > As I have mentioned before I have a Johnson furnace which I plan on
                                            > running on propane (100# tank).
                                            >
                                            > Other than the photo section of this group, are there any other
                                            groups
                                            > that cover casting that have photos of examples of foundry setups?
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Thanks
                                            >
                                            > TMT
                                            >
                                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.