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Re: sand

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  • Lyle
    Insert is not cast in. I really can t give you any advice regarding casting the insert in- place. I have never done it. I have heard of it being sucessfully
    Message 1 of 26 , Feb 5, 2007
      Insert is not cast in.
      I really can't give you any advice regarding casting the insert in-
      place. I have never done it. I have heard of it being sucessfully
      done but not me. I have used steel "cores" in some of my castings
      where I needed a cylindrical core. The core was able to be pressed
      out later. In that case. I did not preheat the core but I did coat
      the core with a layer of soot from acetylene torch.
      LL

      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Long" <marylong8@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks' for your response. Do you cast the insert in at the time
      they are pored or do you machine them out and then shrink a insert
      in . What type of material do you use for the insert? If you do cast
      them in at the time of poring do you heat the insert up and if so to
      what temp and what form is the insert made in to keep it from loosing
      up? By the way I took your advice and sprayed a can of variathain
      polyurethane on the pattern. The pattern looks and feels like glass.
      Some knowledgeable person said that it wisent a good idea because the
      sand would stick to it but I had one pored last Friday and nothing
      stuck to it. pattern is presently at the foundry Initial poring will
      be 35 castings they told me that every thing should be casted and
      back from the heat treat by Friday. Thanks For your input. -Phil-
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Lyle
      > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, February 05, 2007 7:30 AM
      > Subject: [hobbicast] Re: sand
      >
      >
      > Phil,
      > They were cast from A356 then degassed, poured, and heat treated
      to a
      > T6 condition. The cases have steel inserts that the races press
      into.
      > This was because of the original ones I designed mine from did
      the
      > same. If you look at standard sport scout cases, they are alot
      > smaller around the bearing area. The advantage is not only
      strength
      > but the ability to press in an out new races without having to
      worry
      > about hogging out the aluminum. I've seen your cases and I am
      pretty
      > impressed.
      > Lyle
      >
      > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Long" <marylong8@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Lyle, Are your Warrior cases made out of a356 and then T6's ?
      do
      > you have or intend to have steel or iron inserts in the main
      bearing
      > bores that the bearing races will press into? What in your
      opinion
      > are the advantages or disadvantages of having the main bearing
      bores
      > with or without the inserts? Thank You -Phil
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Lyle
      > > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Sunday, February 04, 2007 5:50 PM
      > > Subject: [hobbicast] Re: sand
      > >
      > >
      > > Just got back from picking up foundry supplies in Minneapolis.
      > Last I
      > > bought it, sand was about $8/100 lb bag. Now it's $9/ 50 lbs of
      > AFS
      > > 120. For some reason sand has really gone up the last year.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Jeshua Lacock
      ... I will add that a bag a of graphite dust around serves the same purpose as the soot. Just dip the part or paint it - I too have used inserts including
      Message 2 of 26 , Feb 6, 2007
        On Feb 5, 2007, at 10:03 AM, Lyle wrote:

        > I have used steel "cores" in some of my castings
        > where I needed a cylindrical core. The core was able to be pressed
        > out later. In that case. I did not preheat the core but I did coat
        > the core with a layer of soot from acetylene torch.

        I will add that a bag a of graphite dust around serves the same
        purpose as the soot. Just dip the part or paint it - I too have used
        inserts including steel conduit, copper, brass and even bolts - then
        your part is even threaded out of the sand!

        As long as there is a coating of soot/graphite and there are not any
        undercuts, than the part should be removable. Use the opposite
        approach to make other metals integral.

        When I converted a old cement mixer to a frame for my tilting
        furnace, the only part I had to make was the pivot (the nylon one it
        came with was obviously not going to work). I used a copper conduit
        for both a smooth hole (I just pressed the copper into the foam) and
        the copper works as a bushing. Below is a link showing from the sand
        to installation to doing actual work (you can see the copper in the
        casting):

        <http://OpenOSX.com/hotspring/foundry/tilt/tilt.html>


        Cheers,

        Jeshua Lacock, Owner
        <http://OpenOSX.com>
        phone: 877.240.1364
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