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Source for snap flasks, or parts to make one?

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  • zephyrosjm
    Anyone know where to buy snap flasks or at least the parts for creating your own? New or used. Thanks for any help, - Wade
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 13, 2006
      Anyone know where to buy snap flasks or at least the parts for
      creating your own? New or used.

      Thanks for any help,

      - Wade
    • Dick Morris
      Take a look at this wooden design from a former list member. He doesn t have this info on his current web site, this is an archive site.
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 13, 2006
        Take a look at this wooden design from a former list member. He
        doesn't have this info on his current web site, this is an archive
        site. http://web.archive.org/web/20040216093757/www.ray-vin.com/frfoundry.htm

        Dick Morris
        Anchorage, Alaska


        At 01:52 PM 8/13/2006, you wrote:
        >Anyone know where to buy snap flasks or at least the parts for
        >creating your own? New or used.
        >
        >Thanks for any help,
        >
        >- Wade
      • zephyrosjm
        Thanks for the link to the wooden snap flask design Dick. That was helpful. I was also hoping someone knew of a source for the snap flask parts. It would be
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 15, 2006
          Thanks for the link to the wooden snap flask design Dick. That was
          helpful.

          I was also hoping someone knew of a source for the snap flask
          parts. It would be nice to order some standard parts (the guides
          and snaps) for one and just put them on my own wooden frame.

          I was suprised to find that supply places I found on the web did not
          carry snap flasks. Maybe regular flasks, but not any snaps ones or
          parts. If anyone know a source?

          - Wade

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Dick Morris <rmorris@...> wrote:
          >
          > Take a look at this wooden design from a former list member. He
          > doesn't have this info on his current web site, this is an archive
          > site. http://web.archive.org/web/20040216093757/www.ray-
          vin.com/frfoundry.htm
          >
          > Dick Morris
          > Anchorage, Alaska
          >
          >
          > At 01:52 PM 8/13/2006, you wrote:
          > >Anyone know where to buy snap flasks or at least the parts for
          > >creating your own? New or used.
          > >
          > >Thanks for any help,
          > >
          > >- Wade
          >
        • george vontorne
          Hey Wade, I thought that was why we all wanted to cast things. You could make guide pins like I did. George in Oly,Wa. ... [Non-text portions of this message
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 15, 2006
            Hey Wade,
            I thought that was why we all wanted to cast things.
            You could make guide pins like I did.
            George in Oly,Wa.



            >Thanks for the link to the wooden snap flask design Dick. That was
            >helpful.
            >
            >I was also hoping someone knew of a source for the snap flask
            >parts. It would be nice to order some standard parts (the guides
            >and snaps) for one and just put them on my own wooden frame.
            >
            >I was suprised to find that supply places I found on the web did not
            >carry snap flasks. Maybe regular flasks, but not any snaps ones or
            >parts. If anyone know a source?
            >
            >- Wade
            >
            >--- In
            ><mailto:hobbicast%40yahoogroups.com>hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Dick
            >Morris <rmorris@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Take a look at this wooden design from a former list member. He
            > > doesn't have this info on his current web site, this is an archive
            > > site.
            > <http://web.archive.org/web/20040216093757/www.ray->http://web.archive.org/web/20040216093757/www.ray-
            >vin.com/frfoundry.htm
            > >
            > > Dick Morris
            > > Anchorage, Alaska
            > >
            > >
            > > At 01:52 PM 8/13/2006, you wrote:
            > > >Anyone know where to buy snap flasks or at least the parts for
            > > >creating your own? New or used.
            > > >
            > > >Thanks for any help,
            > > >
            > > >- Wade
            > >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bryan
            Fremont flask and Hines flask....both sell parts and both can be googled. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 15, 2006
              Fremont flask and Hines flask....both sell parts and both can be googled.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Dave
              Last checked this is a casting group. How about trying to make your own pattern and casting the pieces to make your own, it would be a good practice;-) It
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 16, 2006
                Last checked this is a casting group. How about trying to make your
                own pattern and casting the pieces to make your own, it would be a
                good practice;-) It would be cheaper in the long run. a 10X10 steel
                flask is about $180 a snap flask will be more and you'll need jackets,
                one for each mold, as well. I have some pictures in the
                photos 'Dave's shop' section, of the flasks I've made.


                --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "zephyrosjm" <zephyrosjm@...> wrote:
                >
                > Anyone know where to buy snap flasks or at least the parts for
                > creating your own? New or used.
                >
                > Thanks for any help,
                >
                > - Wade
                >
              • paololaciura
                I want to make some very small castings of detail parts for model railroading purposes. This is a low production effort, I want to melt the material over a
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 17, 2006
                  I want to make some very small castings of detail parts for model
                  railroading purposes. This is a low production effort, I want to melt
                  the material over a propane flame and cast in hard rubber molds. What
                  material should I obtain from a usability and safety standpoint?

                  Paul
                • David Patterson
                  try this http://www.freemansupply.com/DuplicatingWhiteMe.htm paololaciura wrote: I want to make some very small castings
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 17, 2006
                    try this http://www.freemansupply.com/DuplicatingWhiteMe.htm

                    paololaciura <paullaciura@...> wrote: I want to make some very small castings of detail parts for model
                    railroading purposes. This is a low production effort, I want to melt
                    the material over a propane flame and cast in hard rubber molds. What
                    material should I obtain from a usability and safety standpoint?

                    Paul





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                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Dan Brewer
                    Here are some places that sell low temp metals and supplies http://www.eazall.com/ http://www.freemansupply.com
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 17, 2006
                      Here are some places that sell low temp metals and supplies

                      http://www.eazall.com/

                      http://www.freemansupply.com <http://www.freemansupply.com/>

                      http://www.westernsculptingsupply.com/waxs.html

                      http://www.tekcast.com/catalog/index.php

                      http://www.smoothon.com/

                      http://www.silicones-inc.com/

                      http://www.enigmetallic.com/links.htm

                      http://www.tapplastics.com/

                      http://www.sculpture-depot.com/index.html





                      Dan in Auburn



                      _____

                      From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      Of paololaciura
                      Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2006 10:30 AM
                      To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [hobbicast] Low Temperature Metal



                      I want to make some very small castings of detail parts for model
                      railroading purposes. This is a low production effort, I want to melt
                      the material over a propane flame and cast in hard rubber molds. What
                      material should I obtain from a usability and safety standpoint?

                      Paul





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • David T
                      Paul, Try these low melting alloys available from Small Parts Inc. I d choose either the LM-281 (no toxic metals) or the LM-255 (lead- bismuth). If people will
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 17, 2006
                        Paul,

                        Try these low melting alloys available from Small Parts Inc. I'd
                        choose either the LM-281 (no toxic metals) or the LM-255 (lead-
                        bismuth). If people will handle the castings, stay away from cadmium-
                        containing alloys. McMaster-Carr also has a variety of casting alloys
                        in a variety of melting points and prices.


                        http://www.smallparts.com/products/descriptions/lma.cfm
                        http://www.mcmaster.com/
                        (search for "casting alloys")

                        On Aug 17, 2006, at 1:30 PM, paololaciura wrote:

                        > I want to make some very small castings of detail parts for model
                        > railroading purposes. This is a low production effort, I want to melt
                        > the material over a propane flame and cast in hard rubber molds. What
                        > material should I obtain from a usability and safety standpoint?
                        >
                        > Paul
                        >
                        >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Jeshua Lacock
                        Greetings, I am designing a sign that I am going to cast out of Aluminum. Instead of having it stenciled I am going to cut the outlines of the letters (from
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 21, 2006
                          Greetings,

                          I am designing a sign that I am going to cast out of Aluminum.

                          Instead of having it "stenciled" I am going to cut the outlines of
                          the letters (from foam) then insert glass (hand casted) pieces
                          slightly smaller than the aluminum openings so that I can fill the
                          gap with lead or some soft metal so that the glass won't shatter from
                          the difference in coefficiency.

                          Questions: If I warm the glass to around 800F, would it be safe to
                          just pour lead in to fill the gap between my glass and aluminum
                          without shattering the glass? Would the lead will be adequate to keep
                          the glass from shattering? If not, how can I cast glass in aluminum
                          openings properly? I imagine if I heat the glass to 800F and keep the
                          pouring temperature around 800F I should not even have to anneal the
                          glass again.

                          Any and all thoughts and advice is welcome....


                          Thanks,

                          Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                          <http://OpenOSX.com>
                          phone: 877.240.1364
                        • Daniel C Postellon
                          I have just cast obsidian in place in molten aluminum. It may have worked due to a low coefficient of expansion of obsidian, which is a fused silica natural
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 22, 2006
                            I have just cast obsidian "in place" in molten aluminum. It may have worked
                            due to a low coefficient of expansion of obsidian, which is a fused silica
                            natural glass. Some obsidians are "hydrated" (contain a lot of water) and
                            might explode with this technique. I would seriously try a test piece, to
                            see if you can cast the aluminum around the glass. The aluminum cools
                            rather quickly, even in molding sand, and it might not heat the glass
                            quickly enough to damage it.
                            I would worry about electrolytic corrosion if you poured lead into aluminum.
                            You could also try using a zinc-based alloy, or some metal that melts at an
                            even lower temperature. Some of these have a lower melting point than lead.
                            >
                            >
                            > Greetings,
                            >
                            > I am designing a sign that I am going to cast out of Aluminum.
                            >
                            > Instead of having it "stenciled" I am going to cut the outlines of
                            > the letters (from foam) then insert glass (hand casted) pieces
                            > slightly smaller than the aluminum openings so that I can fill the
                            > gap with lead or some soft metal so that the glass won't shatter from
                            > the difference in coefficiency.
                            >
                            > Questions: If I warm the glass to around 800F, would it be safe to
                            > just pour lead in to fill the gap between my glass and aluminum
                            > without shattering the glass? Would the lead will be adequate to keep
                            > the glass from shattering? If not, how can I cast glass in aluminum
                            > openings properly? I imagine if I heat the glass to 800F and keep the
                            > pouring temperature around 800F I should not even have to anneal the
                            > glass again.
                            >
                            > Any and all thoughts and advice is welcome....
                            >
                            >
                            > Thanks,
                            >
                            > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                            > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                            > phone: 877.240.1364
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          • Jeshua Lacock
                            ... Thanks for the advice! Hmmm. Yes I am aware that I can experiment - I was hoping someone could offer some advise so I could minimize that process. Obsidian
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 22, 2006
                              On Aug 22, 2006, at 7:37 AM, Daniel C Postellon wrote:

                              > I have just cast obsidian "in place" in molten aluminum. It may
                              > have worked
                              > due to a low coefficient of expansion of obsidian, which is a fused
                              > silica
                              > natural glass. Some obsidians are "hydrated" (contain a lot of
                              > water) and
                              > might explode with this technique. I would seriously try a test
                              > piece, to
                              > see if you can cast the aluminum around the glass. The aluminum cools
                              > rather quickly, even in molding sand, and it might not heat the glass
                              > quickly enough to damage it.
                              > I would worry about electrolytic corrosion if you poured lead into
                              > aluminum.
                              > You could also try using a zinc-based alloy, or some metal that
                              > melts at an
                              > even lower temperature. Some of these have a lower melting point
                              > than lead.


                              Thanks for the advice!

                              Hmmm. Yes I am aware that I can experiment - I was hoping someone
                              could offer some advise so I could minimize that process.

                              Obsidian is very different from soft glass, and is much closer to
                              Quartz than the soft glass (eg bottle glass). I have poured aluminum
                              directly on quartz without even heating it without any problems -
                              don't try that with soft glass!). The closer glass is to quartz, the
                              less you have to worry...

                              My main concern is that I if I pour aluminum directly to the (warmed)
                              soft glass, in the Winter or Summer it might shatter. I am planning
                              on doing a lot of work for the sign, and without letting some tests
                              sit outside for a year or many months, I have no idea if the glass
                              will break from thermal expansion. Or is the coefficient of Glass and
                              aluminum similar enough that I needn't worry about it? I am surprised
                              nobody has done this before?

                              How do they seal the windows on the space shuttle I wonder - actually
                              I guess glass plates are mounted between metal plates? They certainly
                              do not use rubber....


                              Thanks,

                              Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                              <http://OpenOSX.com>
                              phone: 877.240.1364
                            • Jeshua Lacock
                              ... Thanks for the advice! Hmmm. Yes I am aware that I can experiment - I was hoping someone could offer some advise so I could minimize that process. Obsidian
                              Message 14 of 14 , Aug 22, 2006
                                On Aug 22, 2006, at 7:37 AM, Daniel C Postellon wrote:

                                > I have just cast obsidian "in place" in molten aluminum. It may
                                > have worked
                                > due to a low coefficient of expansion of obsidian, which is a fused
                                > silica
                                > natural glass. Some obsidians are "hydrated" (contain a lot of
                                > water) and
                                > might explode with this technique. I would seriously try a test
                                > piece, to
                                > see if you can cast the aluminum around the glass. The aluminum cools
                                > rather quickly, even in molding sand, and it might not heat the glass
                                > quickly enough to damage it.
                                > I would worry about electrolytic corrosion if you poured lead into
                                > aluminum.
                                > You could also try using a zinc-based alloy, or some metal that
                                > melts at an
                                > even lower temperature. Some of these have a lower melting point
                                > than lead.


                                Thanks for the advice!

                                Hmmm. Yes I am aware that I can experiment - I was hoping someone
                                could offer some advise so I could minimize that process.

                                Obsidian is very different from soft glass, and is much closer to
                                Quartz than the soft glass (eg bottle glass). I have poured aluminum
                                directly on quartz without even heating it without any problems -
                                don't try that with soft glass!). The closer glass is to quartz, the
                                less you have to worry...

                                My main concern is that I if I pour aluminum directly to the (warmed)
                                soft glass, in the Winter or Summer it might shatter. I am planning
                                on doing a lot of work for the sign, and without letting some tests
                                sit outside for a year or many months, I have no idea if the glass
                                will break from thermal expansion. Or is the coefficient of Glass and
                                aluminum similar enough that I needn't worry about it? I am surprised
                                nobody has done this before?

                                How do they seal the windows on the space shuttle I wonder - actually
                                I guess glass plates are mounted between metal plates? They certainly
                                do not use rubber....


                                Thanks,

                                Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                                <http://OpenOSX.com>
                                phone: 877.240.1364
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